49 Works

Plant responses to diversity-driven selection and associated rhizosphere microbial communities

Cameron Wagg, Terhi Hahl, Sofia Van Moorsel, Marc Schmid, Debra Zuppinger-Dingley & Bernhard Schmid
1. Plant diversity loss can alter plant interactions and rhizosphere microbial communities. These altered interactions in turn exert diversity-driven selection pressures to which plants may respond with phenotypic changes. Diverse plant communities may favour the survival and fitness of individuals with traits that avoid competition. Conversely monocultures may accumulate species-specific pests favouring greater investment in defence traits. Yet it is unknown how altered plant rhizosphere interactions influence the plant diversity-driven selection for altered plant phenotypes....

Estimating uncertainty in divergence times among three-spined stickleback clades using the multispecies coalescent

Bohao Fang, Juha Merilä, Michael Matschiner & Paolo Momigliano
Incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) can lead to biased divergence time estimates. To explore if and how ILS has influenced the results of a recent study of worldwide phylogeny of three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), we estimated divergence times among major clades by applying both a concatenation approach and the multispecies coalescent (MSC) model to single-nucleotide polymorphisms. To further test the influence of different calibration strategies, we applied different calibrations to the root and to younger nodes...

Intraspecific mating system evolution and its effect on complex male secondary sexual traits: does male-male competition increase selection on size or shape?

Julian Baur, Jeannine Roy, Martin A. Schäfer, Nalini Puniamoorthy, Wolf U. Blanckenhorn & Patrick T. Rohner
Sexual selection is generally held responsible for the exceptional diversity in secondary sexual traits in animals. Mating system evolution is therefore expected to profoundly affect the covariation between secondary sexual traits and mating success. While there is such evidence at the interspecific level, data within species remain scarce. We here investigate sexual selection acting on the exaggerated male fore femur and the male wing in the common and widespread dung flies Sepsis punctum and S....

Data from: The way wear goes – phytolith-based wear on the dentine-enamel system in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus)

Louise F. Martin, Daniela Winkler, Thomas Tütken, Codron Daryl, Annelies De Cuyper, Jean-Michel Hatt & Marcus Clauss
The effect of phytoliths on tooth wear and function has been contested in studies of animal plant interactions. For herbivores whose occlusal chewing surface consists of enamel ridges in dentine tissue, the phytoliths might first erode the softer dentine, exposing the enamel ridges to different occlusal forces and thus leading to enamel wear. To test this hypothesis, we fed guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus; n=36 in 6 groups) for three weeks exclusively on dry or fresh...

Phylogeography, more than elevation, accounts for sex-chromosome differentiation in Swiss populations of the common frog (Rana temporaria)

Barret Phillips, Nicolas Rodrigues, Alexandra Jansen Van Rensburg & Nicolas Perrin
Sex chromosomes in vertebrates range from highly heteromorphic (as in most birds and mammals) to strictly homomorphic (as in many fishes, amphibians, and non-avian reptiles). Reasons for these contrasted evolutionary trajectories remain unclear, but species such as common frogs with polymorphism in the extent of sex-chromosome differentiation may potentially deliver important clues. By investigating 92 common-frog populations from a wide range of elevations throughout Switzerland, we show that sex-chromosome differentiation strongly correlates with alleles at...

Data from: Island woodiness underpins accelerated disparification in plant radiations

Nicolai M. Nürk, Guy W. Atchison & Colin E. Hughes
The evolution of secondary (insular) woodiness and the rapid disparification of plant growth forms associated with island radiations show intriguing parallels between oceanic islands and tropical alpine sky islands. However, the evolutionary significance of these phenomena remains poorly understood and the focus of debate. We explore the evolutionary dynamics of species diversification and trait disparification across evolutionary radiations in contrasting island systems compared to their non‐island relatives. We estimate rates of species diversification, growth form...

Data from: Does thermal plasticity align with local adaptation? – An interspecific comparison of wing morphology in sepsid flies

Patrick T. Rohner, Jeannine Roy, Martin A. Schäfer, Wolf U. Blanckenhorn & David Berger
Although genetic and plastic responses are sometimes considered as unrelated processes, their phenotypic effects may often align because genetic adaptation is expected to mirror phenotypic plasticity if adaptive, but run counter to it when maladaptive. The magnitude and direction of this alignment has further consequences for both the tempo and mode of adaptation. To better understand the interplay between phenotypic plasticity and genetic change in mediating adaptive phenotypic variation to climate variability, we here quantified...

Data from: Pollen analogues are transported across greater distances in bee-pollinated than in hummingbird-pollinated species of Justicia (Acanthaceae)

Alexander N. Schmidt-Lebuhn, Matthias Muller, Paola Pozo, Francisco Encinas-Viso & Michael Kessler
Several hummingbird-pollinated plant lineages have been demonstrated to show increased rates of diversification compared to related insect-pollinated lineages. It has been argued that this pattern is produced by a higher degree of specialization on part of both hummingbirds and plants. We here test an alternative hypothesis: The often highly territorial hummingbirds may on average carry pollen over shorter distances than other pollinators and drive diversification by reducing gene flow distances. We present experimental data from...

Assessing seasonal demographic covariation to understand environmental-change impacts on a hibernating mammal

Maria Paniw, Dylan Childs, Kenneth Armitage, Daniel Blumstein, Julien Martin, Madan Oli & Arpat Ozgul
Natural populations are exposed to seasonal variation in environmental factors that simultaneously affect several demographic rates (survival, development, reproduction). The resulting covariation in these rates determines population dynamics, but accounting for its numerous biotic and abiotic drivers is a significant challenge. Here, we use a factor-analytic approach to capture partially unobserved drivers of seasonal population dynamics. We use 40 years of individual-based demography from yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventer) to fit and project population models that...

Data from: Genetic architecture constrains exploitation of siderophore cooperation in the bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia.

Santosh Sathe, Anugraha Mathew, Kirsty Agnoli, Leo Eberl & Rolf Kümmerli
Abstract. Explaining how cooperation can persist in the presence of cheaters, exploiting the cooperative acts, is a challenge for evolutionary biology. Microbial systems have proved extremely useful to test evolutionary theory and identify mechanisms maintaining cooperation. One of the most widely studied system is the secretion and sharing of iron-scavenging siderophores by Pseudomonas bacteria, with many insights gained from this system now being considered as hallmarks of bacterial cooperation. Here, we introduce siderophore secretion by...

Evolution under pH stress and high population densities leads to increased density-dependent fitness in the protist Tetrahymena thermophila

Felix Moerman, Angelina Arquint, Stefanie Merkli, Andreas Wagner, Florian Altermatt & Emanuel Fronhofer
Abiotic stress is a major force of selection that organisms are constantly facing. While the evolutionary effects of various stressors have been broadly studied, it is only more recently that the relevance of interactions between evolution and underlying ecological conditions, that is, eco-evolutionary feedbacks, have been highlighted. Here, we experimentally investigated how populations adapt to pH-stress under high population densities. Using the protist species Tetrahymena thermophila, we studied how four different genotypes evolved in response...

Data from: Implementation of new standard operating procedures for geriatric trauma patients with multiple injuries: a single level I trauma centre study

Lorenz Peterer, Christian Ossendorf, Kai Oliver Jensen, Georg Osterhoff, Ladislav Mica, Burkhardt Seifert, Clément ML Werner, Hans-Peter Simmen, Hans-Christoph Pape & Kai Sprengel
Background The demographic changes towards ageing of the populations in developed countries impose a challenge to trauma centres, as geriatric trauma patients require specific diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. This study investigated whether the integration of new standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the resuscitation room (ER) has an impact on the clinical course in geriatric patients. The new SOPs were designed for severely injured adult trauma patients, based on the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) and...

Data from: Diversity, dynamics and effects of long terminal repeat retrotransposons in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon

Anne C. Roulin, Christoph Stritt, Michele Wyler, Elena L. Gimmi & Martin Pippel
Transposable elements (TEs) are the main reason for the high plasticity of plant genomes, where they occur as communities of diverse evolutionary lineages. Because research has typically focused on single abundant families or summarized TEs at a coarse taxonomic level, our knowledge about how these lineages differ in their effects on genome evolution is still rudimentary. Here we investigate the community composition and dynamics of 32 long terminal repeat retrotransposon (LTR-RT) families in the 272...

Data from: Global fern and lycophyte richness explained: how regional and local factors shape plot richness

Michael Kessler, Anna Weigand, Helge Bruelheide, Hanna Tuomisto, Holger Kreft & Patrick Weigelt
Aim To disentangle the influence of environmental factors at different spatial grains (regional and local) on fern and lycophyte species richness and ask how regional and plot-level richness are related to each other. Location Global. Time Period Present. Major Taxa studied Ferns and lycophytes. Methods We explored fern and lycophyte species richness at two spatial grains, regional (hexagonal grid cells of 7666 km2) and plot-level (300–500 m2), in relation to environmental data at regional and...

Epidermal Growth Factor signaling promotes sleep through a combined series and parallel neural circuit

Jan Konietzka, Maximilian Fritz, Silvan Spiri, Rebecca McWhirter, Andreas Leha, Sierra Palumbos, Wagner Steuer Costa, Alexandra Oranth, Alexander Gottschalk, , Alex Hajnal & Henrik Bringmann
Sleep requires sleep-active neurons that depolarize to inhibit wake circuits. Sleep-active neurons are under the control of homeostatic mechanisms that determine sleep need. However, little is known about the molecular and circuit mechanisms that translate sleep need into the depolarization of sleep-active neurons. During many stages and conditions in C. elegans, sleep requires a sleep-active neuron called RIS. Here, we defined the transcriptome of RIS to discover that genes of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor...

Data from: Niches within a niche: ecological differentiation of subterranean amphipods across Europe’s interstitial waters

Cene Fiser, Teo Delić, Roman Luštrik, Maja Zagmajster & Florian Altermatt
Species that successfully colonized subterranean environments are subject to two opposing selection processes. Stringent abiotic factors select for convergent adaptations, such as loss of eyes and pigments, while interspecific competition drives between-species divergence. Subterranean species can resolve opposing selection by adaptation to physically different microhabitats. Yet, species frequently co-occur in physically homogeneous subterranean habitats, like interstitial. These co-occurrences in such a narrow ecological context can be explained either by equalizing mechanisms, in which neither of...

Cross-scale Spatial Enrichment of Trajectories for Speeding Up Similarity Computing

Cheng Fu & Robert Weibel

Embryo survival in the oviduct not significantly influenced by major histocompatibility complex social signaling in the horse

Elise Jeannerat, Eliane Marti, Selina Thomas, Harald Sieme, Claus Wedekind, Dominik Burger & Carolina Herrera
The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) influences sexual selection in various vertebrates. Recently, MHC-linked social signaling was also shown to influence female fertility in horses (Equus caballus) diagnosed 17 days after fertilization. However, it remained unclear at which stage the pregnancy was terminated. Here we test if MHC-linked cryptic female choice in horses happens during the first days of pregnancy, i.e., until shortly after embryonic entrance into the uterus and before fixation in the endometrium. We...

Inferring competitive outcomes, ranks and intransitivity from empirical data: A comparison of different methods

Enrica De Luca, Bernhard Schmid, Yanhao Feng, Santiago Soliveres, Eric Allan, Benjamin Rosenbaum, Cameron Wagg, Andrea Tabi, Nico Eisenhauer, Alexandra Weigelt, Wolfgang W. Weisser, Christiane Roscher & Markus Fischer
The inference of pairwise competitive outcomes (PCO) and multispecies competitive ranks and intransitivity from empirical data is essential to evaluate how competition shapes plant communities. Three categories of methods, differing in theoretical background and data requirements, have been used: (a) theoretically sound coexistence theory‐based methods, (b) index‐based methods, and (c) ‘process‐from‐pattern’ methods. However, how they are related is largely unknown. In this study, we explored the relations between the three categories by explicitly comparing three...

Gene flow limits adaptation along steep environmental gradients

Judith Bachmann, Alexandra Jansen Van Rensburg, Maria Cortazar-Chinarro, Anssi Laurila & Josh Van Buskirk
When environmental variation is spatially continuous, dispersing individuals move among nearby sites with similar habitat conditions. But as an environmental gradient becomes steeper, gene flow may connect more divergent habitats, and this is predicted to reduce the slope of the adaptive cline that evolves. We compared quantitative genetic divergence of Rana temporaria frog populations along a 2000-m elevational gradient in eastern Switzerland (new experimental results) with divergence along a 1550-km latitudinal gradient in Fennoscandia (previously...

Capture-recapture data with partially known birth date in four populations of yellow-bellied toads

Hugo Cayuela, Jean-François Lemaître, Eric Bonnaire, Julian Pichenot & Benedikt Schmidt
1. Patterns of actuarial senescence can be highly variable among species. Previous comparative analyses revealed that both age at the onset of senescence and rates of senescence are linked to species position along the fast-slow life-history continuum. As there are few long-term datasets of wild populations with known-age individuals, intraspecific (i.e. between-population) variation in senescence is understudied and limited to comparisons of wild and captive populations of the same species, mostly birds and mammals. 2....

Data from: A selfish genetic element linked to increased lifespan impacts metabolism in female house mice

Patricia C Lopes & Anna K Lindholm
Gene drive systems can lead to the evolution of traits that further enhance the transmission of the driving element. In gene drive, one allele is transmitted to offspring at a higher frequency than the homologous allele. This has a range of consequences, which generally include a reduction in fitness of the carrier of the driving allele, making such systems selfish. The t haplotype is one such driver, found in house mice. It is linked to...

Data from: Cross-species hybridization and the origin of North African date palms

Jonathan M. Flowers, Khaled M. Hazzouri, Muriel Gros-Balthazard, Ziyi Mo, Konstantina Koutroumpa, Andreas Perrakis, Sylvie Ferrand, Hussam S. M. Khierallah, Dorian Q. Fuller, Frederique Aberlenc, Christini Fournaraki & Michael D. Purugganan
Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is a major fruit crop of arid regions that were domesticated 7,000 y ago in the Near or Middle East. This species is cultivated widely in the Middle East and North Africa, and previous population genetic studies have shown genetic differentiation between these regions. We investigated the evolutionary history of P. dactylifera and its wild relatives by resequencing the genomes of date palm varieties and five of its closest relatives....

Data from: A novel biomechanical approach for animal behaviour recognition using accelerometers

Pritish Chakravarty, Gabriele Cozzi, Arpat Ozgul & Kamiar Aminian
Data from animal‐borne inertial sensors are widely used to investigate several aspects of an animal's life, such as energy expenditure, daily activity patterns and behaviour. Accelerometer data used in conjunction with machine learning algorithms have been the tool of choice for characterising animal behaviour. Although machine learning models perform reasonably well, they may not rely on meaningful features, nor lend themselves to physical interpretation of the classification rules. This lack of interpretability and control over...

Registration Year

  • 2019
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Affiliations

  • University of Zurich
    49
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • University of Lausanne
    3
  • Uppsala University
    3
  • Ghent University
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  • University of Göttingen
    2
  • University College London
    2
  • University of Ottawa
    2
  • UNSW Sydney
    2
  • University of Bristol
    2