9 Works

Data from: Discovery and exploitation of a natural ecological trap for a mosquito disease vector

Allison M. Gardner, Ephantus J. Muturi & Brian F. Allan
Ecological traps occur due to a mismatch between a habitat’s attractiveness and quality, wherein organisms show preference for low-quality habitats over other available high-quality habitats. Our previous research identified leaf litter from common blackberry (Rubus allegheniensis) as a natural ecological trap for an important vector for West Nile virus (Culex pipiens), attracting mosquitoes to oviposit in habitats deleterious to the survival of their larvae. Here we demonstrate that manipulation of leaf litter in stormwater catch...

Data from: Phenotypic integration in an extended phenotype: among‐individual variation in nest‐building traits of the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata)

Raphaël Royauté, Elisabeth S. Wilson, Bryan R. Helm, Rachel E. Malinger, Jarrad Prasifka, Kendra J. Greenlee & Julia H. Bowsher
Structures such as nests and burrows are an essential component of many organisms’ life-cycle and requires a complex sequence of behaviors. Because behaviors can vary consistently among individuals and be correlated with one another, we hypothesized that these structures would 1) show evidence of among-individual variation, 2) be organized into distinct functional modules, and 3) show evidence of trade-offs among functional modules due to limits on energy budgets. We tested these hypotheses using the alfalfa...

Data from: Aggregation but not organo-metal complexes contributed to C storage in tidal freshwater wetland soils

Christine E. Maietta, Zachary A. Bernstein, Joshua R. Gaimaro, Victoria L. Monsaint-Queeney, Jeffrey Buyer, Martin Rabenhorst, Andrew H. Baldwin & Stephanie A. Yarwood
One of the many goals of wetland restoration is to promote the long-term storage of carbon (C) in the terrestrial biosphere. Unfortunately, soil C reservoirs in restored wetlands are slow to accumulate even after hydrology and plant communities are reestablished. Oftentimes wetland restoration changes the soil matrix and thus can dramatically alter how soil C is stored and processed. Our research investigated whether soil organic matter (SOM) preservation theories derived from studies in non-wetland soil...

Data from: Weak interspecific interactions in a sagebrush steppe? Conflicting evidence from observations and experiments

Peter B. Adler, Andrew Kleinhesselink, Giles Hooker, Joshua B. Taylor, Brittany Teller & Stephen P. Ellner
Stable coexistence requires intraspecific limitations to be stronger than interspecific limitations. The greater the difference between intra- and interspecific limitations, the more stable the coexistence, and the weaker the competitive release any species should experience following removal of competitors. We conducted a removal experiment to test whether a previously estimated model, showing surprisingly weak interspecific competition for four dominant species in a sagebrush steppe, accurately predicts competitive release. Our treatments were 1) removal of all...

Data from: Population history provides foundational knowledge for utilizing and developing native plant restoration materials

Rob Massatti, Holly R. Prendeville, Steve Larson, Bryce A. Richardson, Blair Waldron & Francis F. Kilkenny
A species’ population structure and history are critical pieces of information that can help guide the use of available native plant materials in restoration treatments and decide what new native plant materials should be developed to meet future restoration needs. In the western United States, Pseudoroegneria spicata (bluebunch wheatgrass; Poaceae) is an important component of grassland and shrubland plant communities and commonly used for restoration due to its drought resistance and competitiveness with exotic weeds....

Data from: Invasion of Hawaiian rainforests by an introduced amphibian predator and N2-fixing tree increases soil N2O emissions

Sharon J. Hall, David P. Huber & R. Flint Hughes
Invasions of introduced species have homogenized ecological communities worldwide, leading to losses of native species and the services they provide. Some of these invaders substantially alter nutrient cycling, which changes conditions for all other organisms, but less is known about the potential influence of these species on nitrogen (N) trace gas emissions that affect atmospheric processes. We used a natural experiment to explore whether the establishment of an introduced nitrogen (N) fixing tree (Falcataria moluccana)...

Data from: The importance of growing up: juvenile environment influences dispersal of individuals and their neighbours

Stacy B. Endriss, Megan L. Vahsen, Ellyn V. Bitume, J. Grey Monroe, Kathryn G. Turner, Andrew P. Norton & Ruth A. Hufbauer
Dispersal is a key ecological process that is strongly influenced by both phenotype and environment. Here, we show that juvenile environment influences dispersal not only by shaping individual phenotypes, but also by changing the phenotypes of neighbouring conspecifics, which influence how individuals disperse. We used a model system (Tribolium castaneum, red flour beetles) to test how the past environment of dispersing individuals and their neighbours influences how they disperse in their current environment. We found...

Data from: CO2 enrichment and soil type additively regulate grassland productivity

H. Wayne Polley, Michael J. Aspinwall, Harold P. Collins, Anne E. Gibson, Richard A. Gill, Robert B. Jackson, Virginia L. Jin, Albina R. Khasanova, Lara G. Reichmann & Philip A. Fay
Atmospheric CO2 enrichment usually increases aboveground productivity (ANPP) of grassland vegetation, but the magnitude of the ANPP-CO2 response differs among ecosystems. Soil properties affect ANPP via multiple mechanisms and vary over topographic to geographic gradients, but have received little attention as potential modifiers of the ANPP-CO2 response. We assessed effects of three soil types, sandy loam, silty clay, and clay, on the ANPP response of perennial C3/C4 grassland communities to a subambient to elevated CO2...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • Agricultural Research Service
    9
  • Cornell University
    3
  • Stanford University
    2
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • Pennsylvania State University
    2
  • University of Padua
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Goiás
    1
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • University of Buenos Aires
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1