35 Works

Integrating UCE phylogenomics with traditional taxonomy reveals a trove of New World Syscia species (Formicidae, Dorylinae)

Michael G. Branstetter & John T. Longino
The ant genus Syscia is part of the cryptic ant fauna inhabiting leaf litter and rotten wood in the Asian and American tropics. It is a distinct clade within the Dorylinae, the subfamily from which army ants arose. Prior to this work the genus comprised seven species, each known from a single or very few collections. Extensive collecting in Middle America revealed an unexpected and challenging diversity of morphological forms. Locally distinct forms could be...

Filtered SNP tables - Rangewide, Hamilton, Tejon, and Madera transects

Paul Gugger, Sorel Fitz-Gibbon, Ana Albarrán-Lara, Jessica Wright & Victoria Sork
Understanding how the environment shapes genetic variation provides critical insight about the evolution of local adaptation in natural populations. At multiple spatial scales and multiple geographic contexts within a single species, such information could address a number of fundamental questions about the scale of local adaptation and whether or not the same loci are involved at different spatial scales or geographic contexts. We used landscape genomic approaches from three local elevational transects and range-wide sampling...

No net insect abundance and diversity declines across US Long Term Ecological Research sites

Michael Crossley, Amanda Meier, Emily Baldwin, Lauren Berry, Leah Crenshaw, Glen Hartman, Doris Lagos-Kutz, David Nichols, Krishna Patel, Sofia Varriano, Matthew Moran & William Snyder
Recent reports of dramatic declines in insect abundance suggest grave consequences for global ecosystems and human society. Most evidence comes from Europe, however, leaving uncertainty about insect population trends worldwide. We used > 5,300 time series for insects and other arthropods, collected over 4-36 years at monitoring sites representing 68 different natural and managed areas, to search for evidence of declines across the United States. Some taxa and sites showed decreases in abundance and diversity...

An Evaluation of the Susceptibility of Goats to Larkspur Toxicosis

Kevin D. Welch, Clint A. Stonecipher, Dale R. Gardner, Benidict T. Green & Daniel Cook
Larkspurs (Delphinium spp.) are a major cause of cattle losses in western North America, whereas sheep have been shown to be resistant to larkspur toxicosis. Goats are often used as a small ruminant model to study poisonous plants, even though they can be more resistant to some poisonous plants. It is not known how susceptible goats are to the adverse effects of larkspurs. In this study, we evaluated the susceptibility of goats to larkspur toxicosis...

Modelled average percentage yield loss due to ozone damage for four global staple crops (2010-2012)

K. Sharps, G. Mills, D. Simpson, H. Pleijel, M. Frei, K. Burkey, L. Emberson, J. Uddling, M. Broberg, Z. Feng, K. Kobayashi & M. Agrawal
Modelled average percentage yield loss due to ground-level ozone pollution (per 1 degree by 1 degree grid cell) are presented for the crops maize (Zea mays), rice (Oryza sativa), soybean (Glycine max) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) for the period 2010-2012. Data are on a global scale, based on the distribution of production for each crop, according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation’s (FAO) Global Agro-Ecological Zones (GAEZ) crop production data for the year 2000. Modelled...

Pitfall and refuge trap sampling Linn Co March 2018-June2019

Inga Reich, Casi Jessie, Seung-Joon Ahn, Man-Yeon Choi, Christopher Williams, Mike Gormally & Rory Mc Donnell
Numbers of carabid beetles, caterpillars, cranefly larvae and slugs collected from pitfall and refuge traps in ten Annual Ryegrass fields in Linn County, Oregon between March 23, 2018 and June 20, 2019. Given are details on sampling date, trap, size and sex (carabids only), weight (slugs only) and species (where possible). Provided are also the results of the molecular gut content analysis of the carabid beetles: Date of gut dissection and associated details on the...

Data from: Hemiptera phylogenomic resources: tree-based orthology prediction and conserved exon identification

Christopher Owen, David Stern, Sarah Hilton & Keith Crandall
High-throughput sequencing of transcriptomes and targeted genomic regions are advancing our knowledge of The Tree of Life. Building phylogenies with regions of the genome requires 1-to-1 ortholog resources of genes and non-coding loci. One organismal group that has received little attention in this area is the Hemiptera, the fifth largest insect order represented by approximately 103,590 named species. Here, we present a set of 3,872 Hemiptera 1-to-1 orthogroups based on tree-based orthology inference of 8...

Data from: Plant biomass, not plant economics traits, determines responses of soil CO2 efflux to precipitation in the C4 grass Panicum virgatum

Robert Heckman, Albina Khasanova, Nicholas Johnson, Sören Weber, Jason Bonnette, Mike Aspinwall, Lara Reichman, Thomas Juenger, Philip Fay & Christine Hawkes
1. Plant responses to major environmental drivers like precipitation can influence important aspects of carbon (C) cycling like soil CO2 efflux (JCO2). These responses may be predicted by two independent classes of drivers: plant size—larger plants respire more and produce a larger quantity of labile C, and plant economics—plants possessing more acquisitive plant economics strategies (i.e., high metabolic rate and tissue nutrient content) produce higher-quality tissue that respires rapidly and decomposes quickly. 2. At two...

Data from: Crop production in the USA is frequently limited by a lack of pollinators

James Reilly, Derek Artz, David Biddinger, Kyle Bobiwash, Natalie Boyle, Claire Brittain, Julia Brokaw, Josh Campbell, Jaret Daniels, Elizabeth Elle, Jamie Ellis, Shelby Fleischer, Jason Gibbs, Robert Gillespie, Knute Gundersen, Larry Gut, George Hoffman, Neelendra Joshi, Ola Lundin, Keith Mason, Carley McGrady, Steve Peterson, Theresa Pitts-Singer, Sujaya Rao, Nikki Rothwell … & Rachael Winfree
Most of the world’s crops depend on pollinators, so declines in both managed and wild bees raise concerns about food security. However, the degree to which insect pollination is actually limiting current crop production is poorly understood, as is the role of wild species (as opposed to managed honey bees) in pollinating crops, particularly in intensive production areas. We established a nation-wide study to assess the extent of pollinator limitation in seven crops at 131...

Datasets used to support the work presented in: Beringer, C.J., K.W. Goyne, R.N. Lerch, E.B. Webb, and D. Mengel. 2020: Clothianidin decomposition in Missouri wetland soils. J. Environ. Qual. JEQ-2020-05-0167-TR

C. J. Beringer, K. W. Goyne, Robert Lerch, E. B. Webb & D. Mengel
Neonicotinoid pesticides can persist in soils for extended time periods; however, they also have a high potential to contaminate ground and surface waters. Studies have reported negative effects associated with neonicotinoids and non-target taxa, including aquatic invertebrates, pollinating insect species, and insectivorous birds. This study evaluated factors associated with clothianidin (1-[(2-chloro-1,3-thiazol-5-yl) methyl]-3-methyl-2-nitroguanidine, CTN) degradation and sorption in Missouri wetland soils to assess the potential for wetland soils to mitigate potential environmental risks associated with neonicotinoids....

Winter inputs buffer streamflow sensitivity to snowpack losses in the Salt River Watershed in the Lower Colorado River Basin

Marcos Robles, John C. Hammond, Stephanie K. Kampf, Joel A. Biederman & Eleonora M. C. Demaria
Recent streamflow declines in the Upper Colorado River Basin raise concerns about the sensitivity of water supply for 40 million people to rising temperatures. Yet, other studies in western US river basins present a paradox: streamflow has not consistently declined with warming and snow loss. A potential explanation for this lack of consistency is warming-induced production of winter runoff when potential evaporative losses are low. This mechanism is more likely in basins at lower elevations...

Evaluation of a microplate spectrophotometer for soil organic carbon determination in south central Idaho

Andrew Bierer, April Leytem, Christopher Rogers & Robert Dungan
Determination of soil organic carbon (SOC) is highly desirable for assessing fertility and carbon sequestration; however, numerous methods of determination warrant study of method agreement. Recently, a novel method was developed following dichromate oxidation using a microplate spectrophotometer. This novel method was compared with (i) total C by dry combustion - soil inorganic carbon (DCw/o pretreatment - Pcal); (ii) traditional Walkley-Black titration (WBTIT) and (iii) loss on ignition (LOI360°C) in calcareous soils of south central...

Data from: Mob and rotational grazing influence pasture biomass, nutritive value, and species composition

Eric Billman, Jessica WIlliamson, Kathy Soder, Danielle Andreen & R. Skinner
This is digital research data corresponding to a published manuscript, Mob and rotational grazing influence pasture biomass, nutritive value, and species composition, in Agronomy Journal, Vol. 112 p. 2866-2878. Mob grazing, which uses very high stocking densities for short durations followed by a relatively long rest period, was designed to mimic bison (Bison bison) grazing in western U.S. grassland. This project assessed the suitability of mob grazing for livestock production in the Northeast. Objectives were...

Dynamics of larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi) pellet consumption and tolerance of the inhibitory effects of larkspur alkaloids on muscle function in cattle.

Benedict T. Green, Jim Pfister, Dale Gardner, Kevin Welch & Daniel Cook
Larkspurs (Delphinium spp.) are toxic native plants on foothill and mountain rangelands in western North America, which poison cattle grazing on those rangelands. The purpose of this study was to examine in a laboratory setting, the subclinical effects of larkspur intake and toxicosis, by allowing larkspur susceptible and resistant cattle to self-select the amount of larkspur consumed in pellet form. We hypothesized that there would be differences in short term (9 – 11 day) pellet...

Data from: Honeybee microbiome is stabilized in the presence of propolis

Perot Saelao, Renata S. Borba, Vincent Ricigliano, Marla Spivak & Michael Simone-Finstrom
Honey bees have developed many unique mechanisms to help ensure the proper maintenance of homeostasis within the hive. One specific method includes the collection of antimicrobial plant resins and wax to form propolis, which is deposited throughout the hive. Propolis is believed to play a significant role in reducing disease load in the colony due to its antimicrobial and antiseptic properties. However, little is known on how propolis may be interacting with the commensal bacteria...

Ecotypic variation in Elymus elymoides productivity and drought resistance traits across the western United States

Dana Blumenthal
Introduction: Understanding local adaptation to climate is critical for managing ecosystems in the face of climate change. While there have been many provenance studies in trees, less is known about local adaptation in herbaceous species, including the perennial grasses that dominate arid and semiarid rangeland ecosystems. Methods and Results: We used a common-garden study to quantify variation in growth and drought-resistance traits in 99 populations of Elymus elymoides from a broad geographic and climatic range...

Nitrate removal and N2O production from upflow and downflow column woodchip bioreactors

Gary Feyereisen, Kurt Spokas, Jeffrey Strock, David Mulla, Andry Ranaivoson & Jeffrey Coulter
Woodchip denitrifying bioreactors (WDBR) reduce off-field tile drainage nitrogen (N) losses from agricultural fields. Limited evaluation exists regarding the influence of flow direction through WDBRs. Changing flow direction could reduce short circuiting. This study evaluated the dependency of nitrate-nitrogen removal and dissolved nitrous oxide (dN2O) production rates on vertical flow direction in triplicate column bioreactors at 12-h (without carbon dosing) and 2-h (with carbon dosing) hydraulic residence times. Results presented demonstrate that there was no...

Data from: Tropical understory herbaceous community responds more strongly to hurricane disturbance than to experimental warming

Deborah Kennard, David Matlaga, Joanne Sharpe, Clay King, Aura Alonso-Rodríguez, Sasha Reed, Molly Cavaleri & Tana Wood
The effects of climate change on tropical forests may have global consequences due to the forests’ high biodiversity and major role in the global carbon cycle. In this study, we document the effects of experimental warming on the abundance and composition of a tropical forest floor herbaceous plant community in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. This study was conducted within Tropical Responses to Altered Climate Experiment (TRACE) plots, which use infrared heaters under free-air,...

Idaho Dairy Industry's Vulnerability to Long-Term Drought

Alycia Bean
This presentation is a summary of some key findings of water rights and their spatial distribution according to priority date and water use code within the Magic Valley in Idaho. With a look at the alfalfa growth in the region coupled with climate change in an already over allocated region in the semi-arid southern region in Idaho, this research examines the potential vulnerability of Idaho's booming dairy industry to long term drought.

Soil and Vegetation Survey of Antelope Pasture, Curlew Grazing Allotment, Oneida County, ID

Merran Owen, Kari E. Veblen, Thomas A. Monaco & Janis L. Boettinger

Long-term evidence shows crop-rotation diversification increases agricultural resilience to adverse growing conditions in North America

Timothy Bowles, Maria Mooshammer, Yvonne Socolar, Franciso Calderón, Michel Cavigelli, Steve Culman, William Dean, Axel Garcia Y Garcia, Amélie Gaudin, W Scott Harkom, Michael Lehman, Shannon Osborne, G Philip Robertson, Jonathan Salerno, Marty Schmer, Jeffrey Strock, A Stuart Grandy & Craig Drury
A grand challenge facing humanity is how to produce food for a growing population in the face of a changing climate and environmental degradation. Though empirical evidence remains sparse, management strategies that increase environmental sustainability, like increasing agroecosystem diversity through crop rotations, may also increase resilience to weather extremes without sacrificing yields. We used multilevel regression analyses of long-term crop yield datasets across a continental precipitation gradient to assess how temporal crop diversification affects maize...

Data From: TERRA-REF, An open reference data set from high resolution genomics, phenomics, and imaging sensors

David LeBauer, Burnette Maxwell, Jeffrey Demieville, Noah Fahlgren, Andrew French, Roman Garnett, Zhenbin Hu, Kimberly Huynh, Rob Kooper, Zongyang Li, Maitiniyazi Maimaitijiang, Jerome Mao, Todd Mockler, Geoffrey Morris, Maria Newcomb, Michael Ottman, Philip Ozersky, Sidike Paheding, Duke Pauli, Robert Pless, Wei Qin, Kristina Riemer, Gareth Rohde, William Rooney, Vasit Sagan … & Charles Zender
The ARPA-E funded TERRA-REF project is generating open-access reference datasets for the study of plant sensing, genomics, and phenomics. Sensor data were generated by a field scanner sensing platform that captures color, thermal, hyperspectral, and active flourescence imagery as well as three dimensional structure and associated environmental measurements. This dataset is provided alongside data collected using traditional field methods in order to support calibration and validation of algorithms used to extract plot level phenotypes from...

Data from: Latent developmental and evolutionary shapes embedded within the grapevine leaf

Dan Chitwood, Robert VanBuren, Zoë Migicovsky, Margaret Frank & Jason Londo
Across plants, leaves exhibit profound diversity in shape. As a single leaf expands, its shape is in constant flux. Plants may also produce leaves with different shapes at successive nodes. In addition, leaf shape varies among individuals, populations and species as a result of evolutionary processes and environmental influences. Because leaf shape can vary in many different ways, theoretically, the effects of distinct developmental and evolutionary processes are separable, even within the shape of a...

Host plant defense produces species-specific alterations to flight muscle protein structure and flight-related fitness traits of two armyworms

Scott Portman
Insects manifest phenotypic plasticity in their development and behavior in response to plant defenses, via molecular mechanisms that produce tissue-specific changes. Phenotypic changes might vary between species that differ in their preferred hosts and these effects could extend beyond larval stages. To test this, we manipulated the diet of southern armyworm (SAW; Spodoptera eridania) and fall armyworm (FAW; Spodoptera frugiperda) using a tomatomutant for jasmonic acid plant defense pathway (def1), and wild-type plants, and then...

Data from: Influence of canopy openness, ungulate exclosure, and low-intensity fire for improved oak regeneration in temperate Europe

Linda Petersson, Daniel Dey, Annika Felton, Emile Gardiner & Magnus Löf
Failed oak regeneration is widely reported in temperate forests and has been linked in part to changed disturbance regimes and land-use. We investigated if the North American fire-oak hypothesis could be applicable to temperate European oaks (Q. robur, Q. petraea) using a replicated field experiment with contrasting canopy openness, protection against ungulate browsing (fencing/no fencing), and low-intensity surface fire (burn/no burn). Survival, relative height growth (RGRH), browsing damage on naturally regenerated oaks (≤300 cm tall),...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    35

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    31
  • Text
    3
  • Interactive Resource
    1

Affiliations

  • Agricultural Research Service
    32
  • University of Minnesota
    4
  • UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    3
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    3
  • University of Gothenburg
    3
  • University of Florida
    3
  • United States Geological Survey
    3
  • Colorado State University
    3
  • University of Arizona
    3
  • Norwegian Meteorological Institute
    2