24 Works

Data from: Long-term balancing selection on chromosomal variants associated with crypsis in a stick insect

Dorothea Lindtke, Kay Lucek, Victor Soria-Carrasco, Romain Villoutreix, Timothy E. Farkas, Rüdiger Riesch, Stuart R. Dennis, Zach Gompert & Patrik Nosil
How polymorphisms are maintained within populations over long periods of time remains debated, because genetic drift and various forms of selection are expected to reduce variation. Here, we study the genetic architecture and maintenance of phenotypic morphs that confer crypsis in Timema cristinae stick insects, combining phenotypic information and genotyping-by-sequencing data from 1360 samples across 21 populations. We find two highly divergent chromosomal variants that span megabases of sequence and are associated with color polymorphism....

Data from: Evolution of woody life form on tropical mountains in the tribe Spermacoceae (Rubiaceae)

Suman Neupane, Paul O. Lewis, Steven Dessein, Hunter Lee Shanks, Sushil Paudyal, Frederic Lens & Hunter Shanks
Spermacoceae are mainly an herbaceous group in the Rubiaceae. However, a few lineages are woody, and are found in a diverse range of habitat types. Three of the largest woody lineages (Arcytophyllum, Hedyotis, and Kadua) are characterized by their distribution in the moist tropical mountains, and have disjunct distribution patterns with respect to their closest relatives. In this study, we explore the cases of derived woodiness in these three lineages and their diversification dynamics in...

Data from: The first Cenozoic spinicaudatans from North America

Alycia L. Stigall, Roy E. Plotnick & Lisa E. Park Bousch
A new spinicaudatan species, Estherites? jocelynae new species, is described from more than fiftyspecimens collected from the Medicine Lodge Formation (early Oligocene) of the Beaverhead Basin in southwestern Montana, USA. This is the first spinicaudatan species reported from Cenozoic strata of North America and is the second-youngest fossil clam shrimp described globally. The new species extends the range of the superfamily Estheriteoidea into the Paleogene. Carapaces of E.? jocelynae n. sp. are preserved as a...

Data from: Avoidance, tolerance, and resistance to ectoparasites in nestling and adult tree swallows

Joely G. DeSimone, Ethan D. Clotfelter, Elizabeth C. Black & Sarah A. Knutie
We examined avoidance, tolerance, and resistance strategies of nestling and adult tree swallows Tachycineta bicolor in response to ectoparasitic blowflies Protocalliphora sialia. Tree swallows avoided settling in north-facing nest boxes early in the breeding season. These boxes were more likely to be parasitized later in the season, suggesting that box selection may facilitate blowfly avoidance. After experimentally manipulating blowfly intensity, we found that nestlings were generally tolerant of parasitism. Parasites significantly reduced nestling blood hemoglobin...

Data from: Isolation by distance and isolation by environment contribute to population differentiation in Protea repens (Proteaceae L.), a widespread South African species

Rachel Prunier, Melis Akman, Colin T. Kremer, Nicola C. Aitken, Aaron Chuah, Justin Borevitz, Kent E. Holsinger & Nicola Aitken
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: The Cape Floristic Region (CFR) of South Africa is renowned for its botanical diversity, but the evolutionary origins of this diversity remain controversial. Both neutral and adaptive processes have been implicated in driving diversification, but population-level studies of plants in the CFR are rare. Here, we investigate the limits to gene flow and potential environmental drivers of selection in Protea repens L. (Proteaceae L.), a widespread CFR species. METHODS: We sampled...

Data from: Adaptation to a latitudinal thermal gradient within a widespread copepod species: the contributions of genetic divergence and phenotypic plasticity

Ricardo J. Pereira, Matthew C. Sasaki & Ronald S. Burton
Understanding how populations adapt to heterogeneous thermal regimes is essential for comprehending how latitudinal gradients in species diversification are formed, and how taxa will respond to ongoing climate change. Adaptation can occur by innate genetic factors, by phenotypic plasticity, or by a combination of both mechanisms. Yet, the relative contribution of such mechanisms to large-scale latitudinal gradients of thermal tolerance across conspecific populations remains unclear. We examine thermal performance in 11 populations of the intertidal...

Data from: Fertilizer legacies meet saltwater incursion: challenges and constraints for coastal plain wetland restoration

Marcelo Ardón, Ashley M. Helton, Mark D. Scheuerell & Emily S. Bernhardt
Coastal wetland restoration is an important tool for climate change adaptation and excess nutrient runoff mitigation. However, the capacity of restored coastal wetlands to provide multiple ecosystem services is limited by stressors, such as excess nutrients from upstream agricultural fields, high nutrient legacies on-site, and rising salinities downstream. The effects of these stressors are exacerbated by an accelerating hydrologic cycle, expected to cause longer droughts punctuated by more severe storms. We used seven years of...

Data from: Assessing the joint behavior of species traits as filtered by environment

Erin M. Schliep, Alan E. Gelfand, Rachel M. Mitchell, Matthew E. Aiello-Lammens, & John A. Silander
Understanding and predicting how species traits are shaped by prevailing environmental conditions is an important yet challenging task in ecology. Functional trait based approaches can replace potentially idiosyncratic species-specific response models in learning about community behavior across environmental gradients. Customarily, models for traits given environment consider only trait means to predict species and functional diversity, as intra-taxon variability in traits is often thought to be negligible. A growing body of literature indicates that intra-taxon trait...

Data from: Genetics redraws pelagic biogeography of Calanus

Marvin Choquet, Maja Hatlebakk, Anusha K.S. Dhanasiri, Ksenia Kosobokova, Irina Smolina, Janne E. Søreide, Camilla Svensen, Webjørn Melle, Sławomir Kwaśniewski, Ketil Eiane, Malin Daase, Vigdis Tverberg, Stig Skreslet, Ann Bucklin & Galice Hoarau
Planktonic copepods of the genus Calanus play a central role in North Atlantic/Arctic marine food webs. Here, using molecular markers, we redrew the distributional ranges of Calanus species inhabiting the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans and revealed much wider and more broadly overlapping distributions than previously described. The Arctic shelf species, C. glacialis, dominated the zooplankton assemblage of many Norwegian fjords, where only C. finmarchicus has been reported previously. In these fjords, high occurrences of...

Data from: The ‘Last Hurrah of the Reigning Darwinulocopines’? Ostracoda (Arthropoda, Crustacea) from the Lower Jurassic Moenave Formation, Arizona and Utah, USA

Lucas S. Antonietto, Lisa E. Park Bousch, Celina A. Suarez, Andrew R.C. Milner & James I. Kirkland
An ostracod fauna is described from lacustrine sediments of the Hettangian, Lower Jurassic Whitmore Point Member of the Moenave Formation. The Moenave is well known for its rich, Late Triassic?–Early Jurassic fossil record, which includes fossil fishes, stromatolites, ostracods, spinicaudatans and a diverse ichnofauna of invertebrates and vertebrates. Four ostracod species, all belonging to the suborder Darwinulocopina, were recovered from these sediments: Suchonellina globosa, Suchonellina stricta, Whipplella? sp. 1 and Whipplella? sp. 2. The diversity...

Data from: Transitions between phases of genomic differentiation during stick-insect speciation

Rüdiger Riesch, Moritz Muschick, Dorothea Lindtke, Romain Villoutreix, Aaron A. Comeault, Timothy E. Farkas, Kay Lucek, Elizabeth Hellen, Víctor Soria-Carrasco, Stuart R. Dennis, Clarissa F. De Carvalho, Rebecca J. Safran, Cristina P. Sandoval, Jeff Feder, Regine Gries, Bernard J. Crespi, Gerhard Gries, Zach Gompert & Patrik Nosil
Speciation can involve a transition from a few genetic loci that are resistant to gene flow to genome-wide differentiation. However, only limited data exist concerning this transition and the factors promoting it. Here, we study phases of speciation using data from >100 populations of 11 species of Timema stick insects. Consistent with early phases of genic speciation, adaptive colour-pattern loci reside in localized genetic regions of accentuated differentiation between populations experiencing gene flow. Transitions to...

Data from: Quantifying the importance of geographic replication and representativeness when estimating demographic rates, using a coastal species as a case study

Christopher R. Field, Katharine J. Ruskin, Bri Benvenuti, Alyssa C. Borowske, Jonathan B. Cohen, Laura Garey, Thomas P. Hodgman, Rebecca A. Kern, Erin King, Alison R. Kocek, Adrienne I. Kovach, Kathleen M. O'Brien, Brian J. Olsen, Nancy Pau, Samuel G. Roberts, Emma Shelly, W. Gregory Shriver, Jennifer Walsh, Chris S. Elphick & Rebecca A. Longenecker
Demographic rates are rarely estimated over an entire species range, limiting empirical tests of ecological patterns and theories, and raising questions about the representativeness of studies that use data from a small part of a range. The uncertainty that results from using demographic rates from just a few sites is especially pervasive in population projections, which are critical for a wide range of questions in ecology and conservation. We developed a simple simulation to quantify...

Data from: Day/night upper thermal limits differ within Ectatomma ruidum ant colonies

Annika S. Nelson, Trey Scott, Maciej Barczyk, Terrence P. McGlynn, Arian Avalos, Elizabeth Clifton, Amlan Das, Andreia Figueiredo, Laura L. Figueroa, Mark Janowiecki, Sarah Pahlke, Jignasha D. Rana & Sean O'Donnell
In the tropics, daily temperature fluctuations can pose physiological challenges for ectothermic organisms, and upper thermal limits may affect foraging activity over the course of the day. Variation in upper thermal limits can occur among and within species, and for social insects such as ants, within colonies. Within colonies, upper thermal limits may differ among individuals or change for an individual throughout the day. Daytime foragers of the Neotropical ant Ectatomma ruidum have higher critical...

Data from: Resolving the Northern Hemisphere source region for the long-distance dispersal event that gave rise to the South American endemic dung moss Tetraplodon fuegianus

Lily Lewis, Elisabeth M. Biersma, Sarah B. Carey, Kent Holsinger, Stuart F. McDaniel, Ricardo Rozzi, Bernard Goffinet & Lily R. Lewis
Premise of the study—American bipolar plant distributions characterize taxa at various taxonomic ranks but are most common in the bryophytes at infraspecific and infrageneric levels. A previous study on the bipolar disjunction in the dung moss genus Tetraplodon found that direct long-distance dispersal from North to South in the Miocene - Pleistocene accounted for the origin of the Southern American endemic Tetraplodon fuegianus, congruent with other molecular studies on bipolar bryophytes. The previous study, however,...

Data from: Subspecies delineation amid phenotypic, geographic, and genetic discordance in a songbird

Jennifer Walsh, Irby J. Lovette, Virginia Winder, Chris S. Elphick, Brian J. Olsen, W. Gregory Shriver, Adrienne I. Kovach & Gregory Shriver
Understanding the processes that drive divergence within and among species is a long-standing goal in evolutionary biology. Traditional approaches to assessing differentiation rely on phenotypes to identify intra- and interspecific variation, but many species express subtle morphological gradients in which boundaries among forms are unclear. This intraspecific variation may be driven by differential adaptation to local conditions and may thereby reflect the evolutionary potential within a species. Here, we combine genetic and morphological data to...

Data from: Forecasting potential routes for movement of endemic birds among important sites for biodiversity in the Albertine Rift under projected climate change

Robert Bagchi, David G. Hole, Stuart H.M. Butchart, Yvonne C. Collingham, Lincoln D. Fishpool, Andrew J. Plumptre, Isaiah Owiunji, Hamlet Mugabe, Stephen Willis & Stephen G. Willis
The ability of species to shift their distributions in response to climate change may be impeded by lack of suitable climate or habitat between species’ current and future ranges. We examined the potential for climate and forest cover to limit the movement of bird species among sites of biodiversity importance in the Albertine Rift, East Africa, a biodiversity hotspot. We forecasted future distributions of suitable climate for 12 Albertine Rift endemic bird species using species...

Data from: Origins of the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus): impacts of ice-olation and introgression

Ryan P. Walter, Denis Roy, Nigel E. Hussey, Björn Stelbrink, Kit M. Kovacs, Christian Lydersen, Bailey C. McMeans, Jörundur Svavarsson, Steven T. Kessel, Sebastian Biton Porsmoguer, Sharon Wildes, Cindy A. Tribuzio, Steven E. Campana, Stephen D. Petersen, R. Dean Grubbs, Daniel D. Heath, Kevin J. Hedges & Aaron T. Fisk
Herein, we use genetic data from 277 sleeper sharks to perform coalescent-based modeling to test the hypothesis of early Quaternary emergence of the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) from ancestral sleeper sharks in the Canadian Arctic-Subarctic region. Our results show that morphologically cryptic somniosids S. microcephalus and Somniosus pacificus can be genetically distinguished using combined mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers. Our data confirm the presence of genetically admixed individuals in the Canadian Arctic and sub-Arctic, and...

Data from: Chaparral bird community responses to prescribed fire and shrub removal in three management seasons

Erica A. Newman, Jennifer B. Potts, Morgan W. Tingley, Charles Vaughn & Scott L. Stephens
Chaparral, a type of shrubland common throughout the California Floristic Province, is subject to management and removal in regions where wildfire threatens human lives and property. Management practices include conducting prescribed burns outside of the historical fire season and employing mechanical fuel reduction (mastication). As the wildland–urban interface grows, particularly in coastal California, more of this ecosystem is subject to active management. To understand the ecological implications of current California chaparral fire management practices, we...

Data from: Transcriptomic imprints of adaptation to fresh water: parallel evolution of osmoregulatory gene expression in the Alewife

Jonathan P. Velotta, Jill L. Wegrzyn, Samuel Ginzburg, Lin Kang, Sergiusz Czesny, Rachel J. O'Neill, Stephen D. McCormick, Pawel Michalak & Eric T. Schultz
Comparative approaches in physiological genomics offer an opportunity to understand the functional importance of genes involved in niche exploitation. We used populations of Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) to explore the transcriptional mechanisms that underlie adaptation to fresh water. Ancestrally anadromous Alewives have recently formed multiple, independently derived, landlocked populations, which exhibit reduced tolerance of saltwater and enhanced tolerance of fresh water. Using RNA-seq, we compared transcriptional responses of an anadromous Alewife population to two landlocked populations...

Data from: Experimental assemblage of novel plant-herbivore interactions: ecological host shifts after 40 million years of isolation

Carlos Garcia-Robledo, Carol C. Horvitz, W. John Kress, A. Nalleli Carvajal-Acosta, Terry L. Erwin & Charles L. Staines
Geographic isolation is the first step in insect herbivore diet specialization. Such specialization is postulated to increase insect fitness, but may simultaneously reduce insect ability to colonize novel hosts. During the Paleocene-Eocene, plants from the order Zingiberales became isolated either in the Paleotropics or in the Neotropics. During the Cretaceous, rolled-leaf beetles diversified in the Neotropics concurrently with neotropical Zingiberales. Using a community of Costa Rican rolled-leaf beetles and their Zingiberales host plants as study...

Data from: Subgenome dominance in an interspecific hybrid, synthetic allopolyploid, and a 140-year-old naturally established neo-allopolyploid monkeyflower

Patrick P. Edger, Ronald D. Smith, Michael R. McKain, Arielle M. Cooley, Mario Vallejo-Marin, Yao-Wu Yuan, Adam J. Bewick, Lexiang Ji, Adrian E. Platts, Megan J. Bowman, Kevin Childs, Jacob D. Washburn, Robert Schmitz, Gregory D. Smith, J. Chris Pires & Joshua R. Puzey
Recent studies have shown that one of the parental subgenomes in ancient polyploids is generally more dominant - having both retained more genes and being more highly expressed - a phenomenon termed subgenome dominance. The genomic features that determine how quickly and which subgenome dominates within a newly formed polyploid remain poorly understood. To investigate the rate of subgenome dominance emergence, we examined gene expression, gene methylation, and transposable element (TE) methylation in a natural,...

Data from: Correlated evolution between climate and suites of traits along a fast-slow continuum in the radiation of Protea

Nora Mitchell, Jane E. Carlson & Kent E. Holsinger
Evolutionary radiations are responsible for much of Earth’s diversity, yet the causes of these radiations are often elusive. Determining the relative roles of adaptation and geographic isolation in diversification is vital to understanding the causes of any radiation, and whether a radiation may be labeled as ‘adaptive’ or not. Across many groups of plants, trait-climate relationships suggest that traits are an important indicator of how plants adapt to different climates. In particular, analyses of plant...

Data from: Ecological restoration success is higher for natural regeneration than for active restoration in tropical forests

Renato Crouzeilles, Mariana S. Ferreira, Robin L. Chazdon, David B. Lindenmayer, Jerônimo B. B. Sansevero, Lara Monteiro, Alvaro Iribarrem, Agnieszka E. Latawiec & Bernardo B. N. Strassburg
Is active restoration the best approach to achieve ecological restoration success (the return to a reference condition, that is, old-growth forest) when compared to natural regeneration in tropical forests? Our meta-analysis of 133 studies demonstrated that natural regeneration surpasses active restoration in achieving tropical forest restoration success for all three biodiversity groups (plants, birds, and invertebrates) and five measures of vegetation structure (cover, density, litter, biomass, and height) tested. Restoration success for biodiversity and vegetation...

Data from: Defaunation increases the spatial clustering of lowland Western Amazonian tree communities

Robert Bagchi, Varun Swamy, Jean-Paul Latorre Farfan, John Terborgh, César I. A. Vela, Nigel C. A. Pitman & Washington Galiano Sanchez
1.Declines of large vertebrates in tropical forests may reduce dispersal of tree species that rely on them, and the resulting undispersed seedlings might suffer increased distance- and density- dependent mortality. Consequently, extirpation of large vertebrates may alter the composition and spatial structure of plant communities and impair ecosystem functions like carbon storage. 2.We analysed spatial patterns of tree recruitment within six forest plots along a defaunation gradient in western Amazonia. We divided recruits into two...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    24

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    24

Affiliations

  • University of Connecticut
    24
  • Duke University
    3
  • University of Missouri
    3
  • Utah State University
    2
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    2
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • Australian National University
    2
  • University of Maine
    2
  • University of New Hampshire
    2
  • University of Delaware
    2