11 Works

Exploration of marine lichenized fungi as bioindicators of coastal ocean pollution in the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area

Liam Nokes, Danny Haelewaters & Donald Pfister
This preliminary exploration of marine lichenized fungi (lichens) as bioindicators of water pollution examined the distribution of intertidal lichen communities in the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area with respect to recorded pollution throughout the harbor. We found significant negative associations between pollution measurements and the health of the lichen community based on cover and species richness. We also observed significant differences in species composition between areas of higher pollution and areas of lower pollution,...

Ectomycorrhizal fungal community assembly on seedlings of a Neotropical monodominant tree

Carolyn Delevich, Rachel Koch, M. Catherine Aime & Terry Henkel
Ectomycorrhizal tree species may benefit from positive plant-soil feedbacks, where soil environments near adult trees enhance conspecific seedling growth and survival. In tropical monodominant forests seedling survival is particularly important, as seedling banks help maintain stand-level dominance over generations. Positive plant-soil feedbacks may be mediated by diverse ectomycorrhizal fungal communities, which improve nutrient acquisition of heavily shaded seedlings. Despite the potential importance of these fungi, little is known about ectomycorrhizal fungal community development on seedlings...

COMSOL models of fluid flow in the sarcomere

Sage Malingen, Kaitlyn Hood, Eric Lauga, Anette Hosoi & Thomas Daniel
A highly organized and densely packed lattice of molecular machinery within the sarcomeres of muscle cells powers contraction. Although many of the proteins that drive contraction have been studied extensively, the mechanical impact of fluid shearing within the lattice of molecular machinery has received minimal attention. It was recently proposed that fluid flow augments substrate transport in the sarcomere, however, this analysis used analytical models of fluid flow in the molecular machinery that could not...

Valuing Cooperation and Constructive Controversy: A Tribute to David W. Johnson

Dean Tjosvold, Daniel Druckman, Roger Johnson, Karl Smith & Cary Roseth

INFEWS/T2: Identifying sustainability solutions through global-local-global analysis of the coupled water-agriculture-bioenergy system

Thomas Hertel

Exposure to a fungal pathogen increases the critical thermal minimum of two frog species Datasets

Spencer Siddons
This dataset contains data from a laboratory experiment described in the paper: Siddons, S. R., and Searle, C. L. (Accepted). Exposure to a fungal pathogen increases the critical thermal minimum of two frog species. Ecology and Evolution. The experiment examined how exposure to a virulent fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), affected the critical thermal minimum (CTmin) of two frog species, Hyla versicolor (gray treefrog) and Lithobates palustris (pickerel frog). The CTmin is the minimum thermal...

Colony fitness increases in the honey bee at queen mating frequencies higher than genetic diversity asymptote

Keith S. Delaplane, J. Krispn Given, John Menz & Deborah A. Delaney
Abstract Across the eusocial Hymenoptera, a queen’s mating frequency is positively associated with her workers’ genetic diversity and colony’s fitness. Over 90% of a colony’s diversity potential is achieved by its mother’s tenth effective mating (me); however, many females mate at levels of me > 10, a zone we here call hyperpolyandry. We compared honey bee colony fitness at mating levels near and above this genetic diversity asymptote. We were interested in how hyperpolyandry affects...

Performance and refinement of nitrogen fertilization tools

Curtis Ransom, Jason Clark, Gregory Bean, Christopher Bandura, Matthew Shafer, Newell Kitchen, James Camberato, Paul Carter, Richard Ferguson, Fabián Fernández, David Franzen, Carrie Laboski, David Myers, Emerson Nafziger & John Sawyer
Improving corn (Zea mays L.) N management is pertinent to economic and environmental objectives. However, there are limited comprehensive data sources to develop and test N fertilizer decision aid tools across a wide geographic range of soil and weather scenarios. Therefore, a public-industry partnership was formed to conduct standardized corn N rate response field studies throughout the U.S. Midwest. This research was conducted using a standardized protocol at 49 site-years across eight states over the...

Pathotype complexity and genetic characterization of Phytophthora sojae populations in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio

Linda Hebb, Carl A. Bradley, Santiago Xavier Mideros, Darcy E. P. Telenko, Kiersten Wise & Anne Elizabeth Dorrance
Phytophthora sojae, the causal agent of Phytophthora root and stem rot of soybean, has been managed with single Rps genes since the 1960’s, but has subsequently adapted to many of these resistance genes, rendering them ineffective. The objective of this study was to examine the pathotype and genetic diversity of P. sojae from soil samples across Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio by assessing which Rps gene(s) were still effective and identifying possible population clusters. There...

Response of Avian communities to edges of tropical montane forests: Implications for the future of endemic habitat specialists

Jill Jankowski, Keiller Kyle, Matthew Gasner, Anna Ciecka & Kerry Rabenold
Tropical montane landscapes harbor diverse flora and fauna, and many species there are ecological specialists with narrow elevational distributions, limited geographic ranges, and small global populations. Along elevational gradients, environmental conditions and community composition change dramatically over small spatial scales. As forests are disturbed and edges formed with modified habitat, natural communities could be affected differently across elevations by the many physical and biotic changes at edges. We asked whether forest edges produced altered patterns...

Species abundance along the railway of Kashmir Himalaya

Irfan Rashid, Marifatul Shiekh, Jonas Lembrechts, Anzar Khuroo, Anibal Pauchard & Jeffrey Dukes
1. The significant portion of global terrestrial biodiversity harbored in mountains is under increasing threat from a variety of anthropogenic impacts. Protecting fragile mountain ecosystems requires understanding how these human disturbances affect biodiversity. As roads and railways are extended further into mountain ecosystems, understanding the long-term impacts of this infrastructure on community composition and diversity gains urgency. 2. We used railway corridors constructed across the mountainous landscapes of the Kashmir Himalaya from 1994-2013 to study...

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