838 Works

Data from: Low second-to-fourth digit ratio predicts indiscriminate social suspicion, not improved trustworthiness detection

Wim De Neys, Astrid Hopfensitz, Jean-François Bonnefon & J.-F. Bonnefon
Testosterone administration appears to make individuals less trusting, and this effect has been interpreted as an adaptive adjustment of social suspicion, that improved the accuracy of trusting decisions. Here, we consider another possibility, namely that testosterone increases the subjective cost of being duped, decreasing the propensity to trust without improving the accuracy of trusting decisions. In line with this hypothesis, we show that second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D : 4D, a proxy for effects of testosterone...

Data from: Evolutionary history and genetic parallelism affect correlated responses to evolution

Mickael Le Gac, Tim F. Cooper, Stéphane Cruveiller, Claudine Médigue & Dominique Schneider
We investigated the relationship between genomic and phenotypic evolution among replicate populations of Escherichia coli evolved for 1000 generations in four different environments. By re-sequencing evolved genomes, we identified parallel changes in genes encoding transcription regulators within and between environments. Depending on both the environment and the altered gene, genetic parallelism at the gene level involved mutations that either repeatedly affected identical codons or domains or were more widely distributed within the relevant genes. Evolved...

Data from: Allee effects in ants

Gloria M. Luque, Tatiana Giraud & Franck Courchamp
1. Allee effects occur when the aggregation of individuals result in mutually beneficial intraspecific interactions whereby individual fitness, or per capita growth rate, increases with the number of individuals. Allee effects are common in social species due to their cooperative behaviours, such as breeding, feeding, or defence. Allee effects have important implications for many aspects of basic and applied ecology. Over the past decades, the study of Allee effects has influenced population dynamics, community ecology,...

Data from: Host resistance, population structure and the long-term persistence of bubonic plague: contributions of a modelling approach in the Malagasy focus

Fanny Gascuel, Marc Choisy, Jean-Marc Duplantier, Florence Débarre & Carine Brouat
Although bubonic plague is an endemic zoonosis in many countries around the world, the factors responsible for the persistence of this highly virulent disease remain poorly known. Classically, the endemic persistence of plague is suspected to be due to the coexistence of plague resistant and plague susceptible rodents in natural foci, and/or to a metapopulation structure of reservoirs. Here, we test separately the effect of each of these factors on the long-term persistence of plague....

Data from: A DNA metabarcoding study of a primate dietary diversity and plasticity across its entire fragmented range

Erwan Quéméré, Fabrice Hibert, Christian Miquel, Emeine Lhuillier, Emmanuel Rasolondraibe, Julie Champeau, Clément Rabarivola, Louis Nusbaumer, Cyrille Chatelain, Laurent Gautier, Patrick Ranirison, Brigitte Crouau-Roy, Pierre Taberlet, Lounès Chikhi & Emeline Lhuillier
In tropical regions, most primary ecosystems have been replaced by mosaic landscapes in which species must cope with a large shift in the distribution of their habitat and associated food resources. Primates are particularly vulnerable to habitat modifications. Most species persist in small fragments surrounded by complex human-mediated matrices whose structure and connectivity may strongly influence their dispersal and feeding behavior. Behavioral plasticity appears to be a crucial parameter governing the ability of organisms to...

Data from: To breed or not to breed: endocrine response to mercury contamination by an Arctic seabird

Sabrina Tartu, Aurélie Goutte, Paco Bustamante, Frédéric Angelier, Børge Moe, Céline Clément-Chastel, Claus Bech, Geir Wing Gabrielsen, Jan Ove Bustnes & Olivier Chastel
Mercury, a ubiquitous toxic element, is known to alter expression of sex steroids and to impair reproduction across vertebrates but the mechanisms underlying these effects are not clearly identified. We examined whether contamination by mercury predicts the probability to skip reproduction in black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) from Svalbard. We also manipulated the endocrine system to investigate the mechanism underlying this relationship. During the pre-laying period, we injected exogenous GnRH (gonadotropin-releasing hormone) to test the ability...

Data from: Two colonisation stages generate two different patterns of genetic diversity within native and invasive ranges of Ulex europaeus

Benjamin Hornoy, Anne Atlan, Valérie Roussel, Yvonne M. Buckley & Michèle Tarayre
Genetic diversity and the way a species is introduced influence the capacity of populations of invasive species to persist in, and adapt to, their new environment. The diversity of introduced populations affects their evolutionary potential, which is particularly important for species that have invaded a wide range of habitats and climates, such as European gorse, Ulex europaeus. This species originated in the Iberian peninsula and colonised Europe in the Neolithic; over the course of the...

Data from: Investigation of the geographic scale of adaptive phenological variation and its underlying genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana

Benjamin Brachi, Romain Villoutreix, Nathalie Faure, Nina-Coralie Hautekèete, Yves Piquot, Maxime Pauwels, Dominique Roby, Joel Cuguen, Joy Bergelson & Fabrice Roux
Despite the increasing number of genomic tools, identifying the genetics underlying adaptive complex traits remains challenging in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. This is due, at least in part, to the lack of data on the geographical scale of adaptive phenotypic variation. The aims of this study were (i) to tease apart the historical roles of adaptive and nonselective processes in shaping phenological variation in A. thaliana in France and (ii) to gain insights into...

Data from: Global genetic analysis reveals the putative native source of the invasive termite, Reticulitermes flavipes, in France

Elfie Perdereau, Anne-Geneviève Bagnères-Urbany, Stephanie Bankhead-Dronnet, Simon Dupont, Marie Zimmermann, Edward L. Vargo & Franck Dedeine
Biological invasions are recognized as a major threat to both natural and managed ecosystems. Phylogeographic and population genetic analyses can provide information about the geographical origins and patterns of introduction and explain the causes and mechanisms by which introduced species have become successful invaders. Reticulitermes flavipes is a North American subterranean termite that has been introduced into several areas, including France where introduced populations have become invasive. To identify likely source populations in the USA...

Data from: Are species’ responses to global change predicted by past niche evolution?

Sébastien Lavergne, Margaret E. K. Evans, Ian J. Burfield, Frederic Jiguet & Wilfried Thuiller
Predicting how and when adaptive evolution might rescue species from global change, and integrating this process into tools of biodiversity forecasting, has now become an urgent task. Here we explored whether recent population trends of species can be explained by their past rate of niche evolution, which can be inferred from increasingly available phylogenetic and niche data. We examined the assemblage of 409 European bird species for which estimates of demographic trends between 1970 and...

Data from: Direct genetic evidence for reproductive philopatry and associated fine-scale migrations in female blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus) in French Polynesia.

Johann Mourier & Serge Planes
Conservation of top predators has been emphasised as essential in an ecosystem due to their role in trophic chain regulation. Optimization of conservation strategies for these endangered marine top predators requires direct estimates of breeding patterns and connectivity, which are essential to understand their population dynamics. While there have been some attempts to investigate breeding patterns of reef sharks from litter reconstruction using molecular analyses, direct fine-scale migrations of female sharks for parturition as well...

Data from: Surviving in mountain climate refugia: new insights from the genetic diversity and structure of the relict shrub Myrtus nivellei (Myrtaceae) in the Sahara desert

Jérémy Migliore, Alex Baumel, Marianick Juin, Bruno Fady, Anne Roig, Nathalie Duong & Frédéric Médail
The identification of past glacial refugia has become a key topic for conservation under environmental change, since they contribute importantly to shaping current patterns of biodiversity. However, little attention has been paid so far to interglacial refugia despite their key role for the survival of relict species currently occurring in climate refugia. Here, we focus on the genetic consequences of range contraction on the relict populations of the evergreen shrub Myrtus nivellei, endemic in the...

Data from: Estimation of the dispersal of a major pest of maize by cline analysis of a temporary contact zone between two invasive outbreaks

Gérald Bermond, Aurélie Blin, Elodie Vercken, Virginie Ravigné, Adrien Rieux, Sophie Mallez, Thibaut Morel-Journel, Thomas Guilllemaud & Thomas Guillemaud
Dispersal is a key factor in invasion, and in the persistence and evolution of species. Despite the importance of estimates of dispersal distance, dispersal measurement remains a real methodological challenge. In this study, we characterized dispersal by exploiting a specific case of biological invasion, in which multiple introductions in disconnected areas lead to secondary contact between two differentiated expanding outbreaks. By applying cline theory to this ecological setting, we estimated σ, the standard deviation of...

Data from: Testing and quantifying phylogenetic signals and homoplasy in morphometric data

Christian Peter Klingenberg & Nelly A. Gidaszewski
The relationship between morphometrics and phylogenetic analysis has long been controversial. Here we propose an approach that is based on mapping morphometric traits onto phylogenies derived from other data and thus avoids the pitfalls encountered by previous studies. This method treats shape as a single, multidimensional character. We propose a test for the presence of a phylogenetic signal in morphometric data, which simulates the null hypothesis of the complete absence of phylogenetic structure by permutation...

Data from: Diversification in temporally heterogeneous environments: effect of the grain in experimental bacterial populations.

Patrick A Venail, Nicolas Mouquet, Oliver Kaltz, Isabelle Olivieri & Thomas Pommier
Although theory established the necessary conditions for diversification in temporally heterogeneous environments, empirical evidence remains controversial. One possible explanation is the difficulty of designing experiments including the relevant range of temporal grains and the appropriate environmental tradeoffs. Here, we experimentally explore the impact of the grain on the diversification of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 in a temporally fluctuating environment by including twenty different pairs of environments and four temporal grains. In general, higher levels...

Data from: Identifying insecticide resistance genes in mosquito by combining AFLP genome scan and 454 pyrosequencing

Margot Paris & Laurence Despres
AFLP-based genome scans are widely used to study the genetics of adaptation and to identify genomic regions potentially under selection. However, this approach usually fails to detect the actual genes or mutations targeted by selection due to the difficulty to obtain the sequences from AFLP fragments. Here we combine classical AFLP outlier detection to 454 sequencing of AFLP fragments obtained from chosen individuals to obtain the sequence of outliers. We applied this approach to the...

Data from: Negative frequency-dependent selection of sexually antagonistic alleles in Myodes glareolus

Mikael Mokkonen, Hanna Kokko, Esa Koskela, Jussi Lehtonen, Tapio Mappes, Henna Martiskainen & Suzanne C. Mills
Sexually antagonistic genetic variation, where optimal values of traits are sex-dependent, is known to slow the loss of genetic variance associated with directional selection on fitness-related traits. However, sexual antagonism alone is not sufficient to maintain variation indefinitely. Selection of rare forms within the sexes can help to conserve genotypic diversity. We combined theoretical models and a field experiment with Myodes glareolus to show that negative frequency-dependent selection on male dominance maintains variation in sexually...

Data from: Patterns and processes of dispersal behaviour in arvicoline rodents

Jean-François Le Galliard, Alice Rémy, Rolf A. Ims & Xavier Lambin
A good understanding of mammalian societies requires measuring patterns and comprehending processes of dispersal in each sex. We investigated dispersal behaviour in arvicoline rodents, a sub-family of mammals widespread in northern temperate environments and characterised by a multivoltine life cycle. In arvicoline rodents, variation in life history strategies occurs along a continuum from precocial to delayed maturation that reflects seasonal and ecological fluctuations. We compared dispersal across and within species focusing on the effects of...

Data from: High genetic variation in resting stage production in a metapopulation: is there evidence for local adaptation?

Anne Carole Roulin, Mahendra Mariadassou, Matthew D. Hall, Jean-Claude Walser, Christoph Haag & Dieter Ebert
Local adaptation is a key process for the maintenance of genetic diversity and population diversification. A better understanding of the mechanisms that allow (or prevent) local adaptation constitutes a key in apprehending how and at what spatial scale it occurs. The production of resting stages is found in many taxa and reflects an adaptation to outlast adverse environmental conditions. Daphnia magna (Crustacea) can alternate between asexual and sexual reproduction, the latter being linked to dormancy,...

Data from: Socially-mediated effects of climate change decrease survival of hibernating Alpine marmots

Célia Rezouki, Marion Tafani, Aurélie Cohas, Anne Loison, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Dominique Allainé & Christophe Bonenfant
1. In the context of global change, an increasing challenge is to understand the interaction between weather variables and life histories. Species-specific life histories should condition the way climate influences population dynamics, particularly those that are associated with environmental constraints, such as lifestyles like hibernation and sociality. However, the influence of lifestyle in the response of organisms to climate change remains poorly understood. 2. Based on a 23-year longitudinal study of the Alpine marmot, we...

Data from: Arthropod distribution in a tropical rainforest: tackling a four dimensional puzzle

Yves Basset, Lukas Cizek, Philippe Cuénoud, Raphael K. Didham, Vojtech Novotny, Frode Ødegaard, Tomas Roslin, Alexey K. Tishechkin, Jürgen Schmidl, Neville N. Winchester, David W. Roubik, Henri-Pierre Aberlenc, Johannes Bail, Héctor Barrios, Jonathan R. Bridle, Gabriela Castaño-Meneses, Bruno Corbara, Gianfranco Curletti, Wesley Duarte Da Rocha, Domir De Bakker, Jacques H.C. Delabie, Alain Dejean, Laura L. Fagan, Andreas Floren, Roger L. Kitching … & Jacques H. C. Delabie
Quantifying the spatio-temporal distribution of arthropods in tropical rainforests represents a first step towards scrutinizing the global distribution of biodiversity on Earth. To date most studies have focused on narrow taxonomic groups or lack a design that allows partitioning of the components of diversity. Here, we consider an exceptionally large dataset (113,952 individuals representing 5,858 species), obtained from the San Lorenzo forest in Panama, where the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa was surveyed using 14...

Data from: Population genomic footprints of fine-scale differentiation between habitats in Mediterranean blue tits

Marta Szulkin, Pierre-Alexandre Gagnaire, Nicolas Bierne, Anne Charmantier & P.-A. Gagnaire
Linking population genetic variation to the spatial heterogeneity of the environment is of fundamental interest to evolutionary biology and ecology, in particular when phenotypic differences between populations are observed at biologically small spatial scales. Here, we applied restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq) to test whether phenotypically differentiated populations of wild blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) breeding in a highly heterogeneous environment exhibit genetic structure related to habitat type. Using 12106 SNPs in 197 individuals from deciduous...

Data from: Investigating the genetic architecture of conditional strategies using the environmental threshold model

Bruno Buzatto, Mathieu Buoro, Wade Hazel, Joseph Tomkins, Bruno A. Buzatto, Joseph L. Tomkins & Wade N. Hazel
The threshold expression of dichotomous phenotypes that are environmentally cued or induced comprise the vast majority of phenotypic dimorphisms in color, morphology, behavior, and life history. Modeled as conditional strategies under the framework of evolutionary game theory, the quantitative genetic basis of these traits is a challenge to estimate. The challenge exists firstly because the phenotypic expression of the trait is dichotomous and secondly because the apparent environmental cue is separate from the biological signal...

Data from: Protein expression parallels thermal tolerance and ecologic changes in the diversification of a diving beetle species complex

Amparo Hidalgo-Galiana, Marta Monge, David G. Biron, Francesc Canals, Ignacio Ribera & Alexandra Cieslak
Physiological changes associated with evolutionary and ecological processes such as diversification, range expansion or speciation are still incompletely understood, especially for non-model species. Here we study differences in protein expression in response to temperature in a western Mediterranean diving beetle species complex, using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis with one Moroccan and one Iberian population each of Agabus ramblae and Agabus brunneus. We identified proteins with significant expression differences after thermal treatments comparing them with a...

Data from: Plant–plant interactions as a mechanism structuring plant diversity in a Mediterranean semi-arid ecosystem

Antonio I. Arroyo, Yolanda Pueyo, Hugo Saiz & Concepción L. Alados
Plant–plant interactions are among the fundamental processes that shape structure and functioning of arid and semi-arid plant communities. Despite the large amount of studies that have assessed the relationship between plant–plant interactions (i.e., facilitation and competition) and diversity, often researchers forget a third kind of interaction, known as allelopathy. We examined the effect of plant–plant interactions of three dominant species: the perennial grass Lygeum spartum, the allelopathic dwarf shrub Artemisia herba-alba, and the nurse shrub...

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