67 Works

Data from: Migration and stress during reproduction govern telomere dynamics in a seabird

Jannik Schultner, Børge Moe, Olivier Chastel, Claus Bech & Alexander S. Kitaysky
Changes in telomere length are believed to reflect changes in physiological state and life expectancy in animals. However, much remains unknown about the determinants of telomere dynamics in wild populations, and specifically the influence of conditions during highly mobile life-history stages, for example migration. We tested whether telomere dynamics were associated with migratory behaviour and/or with stress during reproduction in free-living seabirds. We induced short-term stress during reproduction in chick-rearing, black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), tracked...

Data from: Species delimitation and phylogeny in the genus Nasutitermes (Termitidae: Nasutitermitinae) in French Guiana

Virginie Roy, Reginaldo Constantino, Vincent Chassany, Stephanie Giusti-Miller, Michel Diouf, Philippe Mora & Myriam Harry
Species delimitation and identification can be arduous for taxa whose morphologic characters are easily confused, which can hamper global biodiversity assessments and pest species management. Exploratory methods of species delimitation that use DNA sequence as their primary information source to establish group membership and estimate putative species boundaries are useful approaches, complementary to traditional taxonomy. Termites of the genus Nasutitermes make interesting models for the application of such methods. They are dominant in Neotropical primary...

Data from: Genetic diversity, clonality and connectivity in the scleractinian coral Pocillopora damicornis: a multi-scale analysis in an insular, fragmented reef system

Mehdi Adjeroud, Aurélie Guérécheau, Jeremie Vidal-Dupiol, Jean-François Flot, Sophie Arnaud-Haond & François Bonhomme
Clonality and genetic structure of the coral Pocillopora damicornis sensu lato were assessed using five microsatellites in 12 populations from four islands of the Society Archipelago (French Polynesia) sampled in June 2008. The 427 analysed specimens fell into 132 multilocus genotypes (MLGs), suggesting that asexual reproduction plays an important role in the maintenance of these populations. A haploweb analysis of ITS2 sequences of each MLG was consistent with all of them being conspecific. Genetic differentiation...

Data from: Sexual selection against natural hybrids may contribute to reinforcement in a house mouse hybrid zone

Yasmin Latour, Guila Ganem, Carole M. Smadja, Pierre Boursot, Pierre Caminade & Marco Perriat-Sanguinet
Sexual selection may hinder gene flow across contact zones when hybrid recognition signals are discriminated against. We tested this hypothesis in a unimodal hybrid zone between Mus musculus musculus and Mus musculus domesticus where a pattern of reinforcement was described and lower hybrid fitness documented. We presented mice from the border of the hybrid zone with a choice between opposite sex urine from the same subspecies versus hybrids sampled in different locations across the zone....

Data from: Low second-to-fourth digit ratio predicts indiscriminate social suspicion, not improved trustworthiness detection

Wim De Neys, Astrid Hopfensitz, Jean-François Bonnefon & J.-F. Bonnefon
Testosterone administration appears to make individuals less trusting, and this effect has been interpreted as an adaptive adjustment of social suspicion, that improved the accuracy of trusting decisions. Here, we consider another possibility, namely that testosterone increases the subjective cost of being duped, decreasing the propensity to trust without improving the accuracy of trusting decisions. In line with this hypothesis, we show that second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D : 4D, a proxy for effects of testosterone...

Data from: Evolutionary history and genetic parallelism affect correlated responses to evolution

Mickael Le Gac, Tim F. Cooper, Stéphane Cruveiller, Claudine Médigue & Dominique Schneider
We investigated the relationship between genomic and phenotypic evolution among replicate populations of Escherichia coli evolved for 1000 generations in four different environments. By re-sequencing evolved genomes, we identified parallel changes in genes encoding transcription regulators within and between environments. Depending on both the environment and the altered gene, genetic parallelism at the gene level involved mutations that either repeatedly affected identical codons or domains or were more widely distributed within the relevant genes. Evolved...

Data from: Allee effects in ants

Gloria M. Luque, Tatiana Giraud & Franck Courchamp
1. Allee effects occur when the aggregation of individuals result in mutually beneficial intraspecific interactions whereby individual fitness, or per capita growth rate, increases with the number of individuals. Allee effects are common in social species due to their cooperative behaviours, such as breeding, feeding, or defence. Allee effects have important implications for many aspects of basic and applied ecology. Over the past decades, the study of Allee effects has influenced population dynamics, community ecology,...

Data from: Host resistance, population structure and the long-term persistence of bubonic plague: contributions of a modelling approach in the Malagasy focus

Fanny Gascuel, Marc Choisy, Jean-Marc Duplantier, Florence Débarre & Carine Brouat
Although bubonic plague is an endemic zoonosis in many countries around the world, the factors responsible for the persistence of this highly virulent disease remain poorly known. Classically, the endemic persistence of plague is suspected to be due to the coexistence of plague resistant and plague susceptible rodents in natural foci, and/or to a metapopulation structure of reservoirs. Here, we test separately the effect of each of these factors on the long-term persistence of plague....

Data from: A DNA metabarcoding study of a primate dietary diversity and plasticity across its entire fragmented range

Erwan Quéméré, Fabrice Hibert, Christian Miquel, Emeine Lhuillier, Emmanuel Rasolondraibe, Julie Champeau, Clément Rabarivola, Louis Nusbaumer, Cyrille Chatelain, Laurent Gautier, Patrick Ranirison, Brigitte Crouau-Roy, Pierre Taberlet, Lounès Chikhi & Emeline Lhuillier
In tropical regions, most primary ecosystems have been replaced by mosaic landscapes in which species must cope with a large shift in the distribution of their habitat and associated food resources. Primates are particularly vulnerable to habitat modifications. Most species persist in small fragments surrounded by complex human-mediated matrices whose structure and connectivity may strongly influence their dispersal and feeding behavior. Behavioral plasticity appears to be a crucial parameter governing the ability of organisms to...

Data from: To breed or not to breed: endocrine response to mercury contamination by an Arctic seabird

Sabrina Tartu, Aurélie Goutte, Paco Bustamante, Frédéric Angelier, Børge Moe, Céline Clément-Chastel, Claus Bech, Geir Wing Gabrielsen, Jan Ove Bustnes & Olivier Chastel
Mercury, a ubiquitous toxic element, is known to alter expression of sex steroids and to impair reproduction across vertebrates but the mechanisms underlying these effects are not clearly identified. We examined whether contamination by mercury predicts the probability to skip reproduction in black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) from Svalbard. We also manipulated the endocrine system to investigate the mechanism underlying this relationship. During the pre-laying period, we injected exogenous GnRH (gonadotropin-releasing hormone) to test the ability...

Data from: Two colonisation stages generate two different patterns of genetic diversity within native and invasive ranges of Ulex europaeus

Benjamin Hornoy, Anne Atlan, Valérie Roussel, Yvonne M. Buckley & Michèle Tarayre
Genetic diversity and the way a species is introduced influence the capacity of populations of invasive species to persist in, and adapt to, their new environment. The diversity of introduced populations affects their evolutionary potential, which is particularly important for species that have invaded a wide range of habitats and climates, such as European gorse, Ulex europaeus. This species originated in the Iberian peninsula and colonised Europe in the Neolithic; over the course of the...

Data from: Investigation of the geographic scale of adaptive phenological variation and its underlying genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana

Benjamin Brachi, Romain Villoutreix, Nathalie Faure, Nina-Coralie Hautekèete, Yves Piquot, Maxime Pauwels, Dominique Roby, Joel Cuguen, Joy Bergelson & Fabrice Roux
Despite the increasing number of genomic tools, identifying the genetics underlying adaptive complex traits remains challenging in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. This is due, at least in part, to the lack of data on the geographical scale of adaptive phenotypic variation. The aims of this study were (i) to tease apart the historical roles of adaptive and nonselective processes in shaping phenological variation in A. thaliana in France and (ii) to gain insights into...

Data from: Surviving in mountain climate refugia: new insights from the genetic diversity and structure of the relict shrub Myrtus nivellei (Myrtaceae) in the Sahara desert

Jérémy Migliore, Alex Baumel, Marianick Juin, Bruno Fady, Anne Roig, Nathalie Duong & Frédéric Médail
The identification of past glacial refugia has become a key topic for conservation under environmental change, since they contribute importantly to shaping current patterns of biodiversity. However, little attention has been paid so far to interglacial refugia despite their key role for the survival of relict species currently occurring in climate refugia. Here, we focus on the genetic consequences of range contraction on the relict populations of the evergreen shrub Myrtus nivellei, endemic in the...

Data from: Estimation of the dispersal of a major pest of maize by cline analysis of a temporary contact zone between two invasive outbreaks

Gérald Bermond, Aurélie Blin, Elodie Vercken, Virginie Ravigné, Adrien Rieux, Sophie Mallez, Thibaut Morel-Journel, Thomas Guilllemaud & Thomas Guillemaud
Dispersal is a key factor in invasion, and in the persistence and evolution of species. Despite the importance of estimates of dispersal distance, dispersal measurement remains a real methodological challenge. In this study, we characterized dispersal by exploiting a specific case of biological invasion, in which multiple introductions in disconnected areas lead to secondary contact between two differentiated expanding outbreaks. By applying cline theory to this ecological setting, we estimated σ, the standard deviation of...

Data from: Fifty thousand years of arctic vegetation and megafaunal diet

Eske Willerslev, John Davison, Mari Moora, Martin Zobel, Eric Coissac, Mary E. Edwards, Eline D. Lorenzen, Mette Vestergård, Galina Gussarova, James Haile, Joseph Craine, Gaddy Bergmann, Ludovic Gielly, Sanne Boessenkool, Laura S. Epp, Peter B. Pearman, Rachid Cheddadi, David Murray, Karri Anne Bråthen, Nigel Yoccoz, Heather Binney, Corinne Cruaud, Patrick Wincker, Tomasz Goslar, Inger Greve Alsos … & Pierre Taberlet
Although it is generally agreed that the arctic flora is among the youngest and least diverse on Earth, the processes that shaped it are poorly understood. Here we present 50 thousand years (kyr) of arctic vegetation history, derived from the first large-scale ancient DNA metabarcoding study of circumpolar plant diversity. For this interval we additionally explore nematode diversity as a proxy for modelling vegetation cover and soil quality, and diets of herbivorous megafaunal mammals, many...

Data from: Induction of sexual reproduction and genetic diversity in the cheese fungus Penicillium roqueforti

Jeanne Ropars, Manuela López-Villavicencio, Joëlle Dupont, Alodie Snirc, Guillaume Gillot, Monika Coton, Jean-Luc Jany, Emmanuel Coton & Tatiana Giraud
The emblematic fungus Penicillium roqueforti is used throughout the world as a starter culture in the production of blue-veined cheeses. Like other industrial filamentous fungi, P. roqueforti was thought to lack a sexual cycle. However, an ability to induce recombination is of great economic and fundamental importance, as it would make it possible to transform and improve industrial strains, promoting the creation of novel phenotypes and eliminating the deleterious mutations that accumulate during clonal propagation....

Data from: Missing data estimation in morphometrics: how much is too much?

Julien Clavel, Gildas Merceron & Gilles Escarguel
Fossil-based estimates of diversity and evolutionary dynamics mainly rely on the study of morphological variation. Unfortunately, organism remains are often altered by post-mortem taphonomic processes such as weathering or distortion. Such a loss of information often prevents quantitative multivariate description and statistically controlled comparisons of extinct species based on morphometric data. A common way to deal with missing data involves imputation methods that directly fill the missing cases with model estimates. Over the last several...

Data from: Disentangling precopulatory and postcopulatory sexual selection in polyandrous species

Benjamin Pélissié, Philippe Jarne, Violette Sarda & Patrice David
Sexual selection operates on a sequence of events, from mating to offspring production. Which stages in this sequence undergo stronger selection, especially the relative importance of pre- versus postcopulatory processes, are intensely debated issues. Unequal siring success among mates of polyandrous females is classically taken as evidence for a large contribution of postcopulatory processes to the variance in male reproductive success (var(RSm)). However paternity skews also depend on the timing and number of copulations, a...

Data from: Stronger spatial genetic structure in recolonized areas than in refugia in the European beech

Guillaume De Lafontaine, Alexis Ducousso, Sophie Lefèvre, Elodie Magnanou & Rémy J. Petit
Extant rear-edge populations located in former glacial refugia remain understudied despite their high conservation value. These populations should have experienced strong genetic drift due to their small size and long isolation. Moreover, the prolonged action of isolation-by-distance in refugial areas should result in stronger regional spatial genetic structure than in recolonized areas, but empirical tests of this prediction are scarce. To fill this gap, we first used a set of 16 microsatellite markers to investigate...

Data from: The effects of inbreeding, genetic dissimilarity and phenotype on male reproductive success in a dioecious plant

Frédéric Austerlitz, Gabriela Gleiser, Sara Teixeira & Giorgina Bernasconi
Pollen fate can strongly affect the genetic structure of populations with restricted gene flow and significant inbreeding risk. We established an experimental population of inbred and outbred Silene latifolia plants to evaluate the effects of (i) inbreeding depression, (ii) phenotypic variation and (iii) relatedness between mates on male fitness under natural pollination. Paternity analysis revealed that outbred males sired significantly more offspring than inbred males. Independently of the effects of inbreeding, male fitness depended on...

Data from: Fluctuating food resources influence developmental plasticity in wild boar

Marlène Gamelon, Mathieu Douhard, Eric Baubet, Olivier Gimenez, Serge Brandt, Jean-Michel Gaillard & J.-M. Gaillard
To maximize long-term average reproductive success, individuals can diversify the phenotypes of offspring produced within a reproductive event by displaying the ‘coin-flipping’ tactic. Wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa) females have been reported to adopt this tactic. However, whether the magnitude of developmental plasticity within a litter depends on stochasticity in food resources has not been yet investigated. From long-term monitoring, we found that juvenile females produced similar-sized fetuses within a litter independent of food availability....

Data from: Phylogenomics and analysis of shared genes suggest a single transition to mutualism in Wolbachia of nematodes

Francesco Commandatore, Davide Sassera, Matteo Montagna, Sujai Kumar, Georgios Koutsovoulos, Graham Thomas, Charlotte Repton, Simon A. Babayan, Nick Gray, Richard Cordaux, Alistair Darby, Benjamin Makepeace & Mark Blaxter
Wolbachia, endosymbiotic bacteria of the order Rickettsiales, are widespread in arthropods but also present in nematodes. In arthropods, A and B supergroup Wolbachia are generally associated with distortion of host reproduction. In filarial nematodes, including some human parasites, multiple lines of experimental evidence indicate that C and D supergroup Wolbachia are essential for the survival of the host, and here the symbiotic relationship is considered mutualistic. The origin of this mutualistic endosymbiosis is of interest...

Data from: Historical collections reveal patterns of diffusion of sweet potato in Oceania obscured by modern plant movements and recombination

Caroline Roullier, Laure Benoit, Doyle B. McKey & Vincent Lebot
The history of sweet potato in the Pacific has long been an enigma. Archaeological, linguistic and ethnobotanical data suggest that prehistoric human-mediated dispersal events contributed to the distribution in Oceania of this American domesticate. According to the “tripartite hypothesis”, sweet potato was introduced into Oceania from South America in pre-Columbian times, and was then later newly introduced, and diffused widely across the Pacific, by Europeans via two historically documented routes from Mexico and the Caribbean....

Data from: Fossils, molecules, divergence times, and the origin of Lissamphibians

David Marjanović & Michel Laurin
A review of the paleontological literature shows that the early dates of appearance of Lissamphibia recently inferred from molecular data do not favor an origin of extant amphibians from temnospondyls, contrary to recent claims. A supertree is assembled using new Mesquite modules that allow extinct taxa to be incorporated into a time-calibrated phylogeny with a user-defined geological time scale. The supertree incorporates 223 extinct species of lissamphibians and has a highly significant stratigraphic fit. Some...

Data from: Facultative use of thelytokous parthenogenesis for queen production in the polyandrous ant Cataglyphis cursor

Claudie Doums, Adam L. Cronin, Camille Ruel, Pierre Fédérici, Claudy Haussy, Claire Tirard & Thibaud Monnin
The evolutionary paradox of sex remains one of the major debates in evolutionary biology. The study of species capable of both sexual and asexual reproduction can elucidate factors important in the evolution of sex. One such species is the ant Cataglyphis cursor, where the queen maximises the transmission of her genes by producing new queens (gynes) asexually while simultaneously maintaining a genetically diverse workforce via the sexual production of workers. We show that the queen...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    67

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    67

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    67
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    9
  • University of Edinburgh
    4
  • University of Lyon System
    4
  • University of Paris-Sud
    4
  • University of California System
    3
  • Institut de Recherche pour le Développement
    3
  • Centre national de la recherche scientifique
    2
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    2
  • Aarhus University
    2