72 Works

Data from: Postglacial climate changes and rise of three ecotypes of harbor porpoises, Phocoena phocoena, in western Palearctic waters

Michaël C. Fontaine, Kathleen Roland, Isabelle Calves, Frederic Austerlitz, Friso P. Palstra, Krystal A. Tolley, Sean Ryan, Marisa Ferreira, Thierry Jauniaux, Angela Llavona, Bayram Öztürk, Ayaka A. Öztürk, Vincent Ridoux, Emer Rogan, Ursula Siebert, Marina Sequeira, Gísli A. Vikingsson, Asunción Borrell, Johan R. Michaux & Alex Aguilar
Despite no obvious barriers to gene flow in the marine realm, environmental variation and ecological specializations can lead to genetic differentiation in highly mobile predators. Here, we investigated the genetic structure of the harbor porpoise over the entire species distribution range in western Palearctic waters. Combined analyses of ten microsatellite loci and a 5,085 bases-pairs portion of the mitochondrial genome revealed the existence of three ecotypes, equally divergent at the mitochondrial genome, distributed in the...

Data from: One tree to link them all: a phylogenetic dataset for the European Tetrapoda

Cristina Roquet, Sébastien Lavergne & Wilfried Thuiller
Since the ever-increasing availability of phylogenetic informative data, the last decade has seen an upsurge of ecological studies incorporating information on evolutionary relationships among species. However, detailed species-level phylogenies are still lacking for many large groups and regions, which are necessary for comprehensive large-scale eco-phylogenetic analyses. Here, we provide a dataset of 100 dated phylogenetic trees for all European tetrapods based on a mixture of supermatrix and supertree approaches. Phylogenetic inference was performed separately for...

Data from: Multidimensionality in host manipulation mimicked by serotonin injection

Marie-Jeanne Perrot-Minnot, Kevin Sanchez-Thirion & Frank Cézilly
Manipulative parasites often alter the phenotype of their hosts along multiple dimensions. ‘Multidimensionality’ in host manipulation could consist in the simultaneous alteration of several physiological pathways independently of one another, or proceed from the disruption of some key physiological parameter, followed by a cascade of effects. We compared multidimensionality in ‘host manipulation’ between two closely related amphipods, Gammarus fossarum and Gammarus pulex, naturally and experimentally infected with Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala), respectively. To that end, we...

Data from: C, N, and P fertilization in an Amazonian rainforest support stoichiometric dissimilarity as a driver of litter diversity effects on decomposition

Sandra Barantal, Heidy Schimann, Nathalie Fromin & Stephan Hättenschwiler
Plant leaf litter generally decomposes faster as a group of different species than when individual species decompose alone, but underlying mechanisms of these diversity effects remain poorly understood. Because resource C : N : P stoichiometry (i.e. the ratios of these key elements) exhibits strong control on consumers, we supposed that stoichiometric dissimilarity of litter mixtures (i.e. the divergence in C : N : P ratios among species) improves resource complementarity to decomposers leading to...

Data from: A quantitative review of MHC-based mating preference: the role of diversity and dissimilarity

T. Kamiya, K. O'Dwyer, H. Westerdahl, A. Senior & S. Nakagawa
Sexual selection hypotheses stipulate that the major histocompatibility complex genes (MHC) constitute a key molecular underpinning for mate choice in vertebrates. The last four decades saw growing empirical literature on the role of MHC diversity and dissimilarity in mate choice for a wide range of vertebrate animals, but with mixed support for its significance in natural populations. Using formal phylogenetic meta-analysis and meta-regression techniques, we quantitatively review the existing literature on MHC-dependent mating preferences in...

Data from: Cultural evolution of systematically structured behaviour in a non-human primate

Nicolas Claidière, Kenny Smith, Simon Kirby & Joël Fagot
Culture pervades human life and is at the origin of the success of our species. A wide range of other animals have culture too, but often in a limited form that does not complexify through the gradual accumulation of innovations. We developed a new paradigm to study cultural evolution in primates in order to better evaluate our closest relatives' cultural capacities. Previous studies using transmission chain experimental paradigms, in which the behavioural output of one...

Data from: Consistency pays: sex differences and fitness consequences of behavioural specialisation in a wide ranging seabird

Samantha C. Patrick & Henri Weimerskirch
Specialists and generalists often coexist within a single population, but the biological drivers of individual strategies are not fully resolved. When sexes differ in their foraging strategy, this can lead them to different environmental conditions and stability across their habitat range. As such, sexual segregation, combined with dominance, may lead to varying levels of specialization between the sexes. Here, we examine spatial and temporal niche width (intraindividual variability in aspects of foraging behaviour) of male...

Data from: Dispersal propensity in Tetrahymena thermophila ciliates – a reaction norm perspective

Frank Pennekamp, Katherine A. Mitchell, Alexis Serge Chaine, Nicolas Schtickzelle & Alexis Chaine
Dispersal and phenotypic plasticity are two main ways for species to deal with rapid changes of their environments. Understanding how genotypes (G), environments (E) and their interaction (genotype and environment; G x E) each affects dispersal propensity is therefore instrumental for predicting the ecological and evolutionary responses of species under global change. Here we used an actively dispersing ciliate to quantify the contributions of G, E, and G x E on dispersal propensity, exposing 44...

Data from: Senescence or selective disappearance? Age trajectories of body mass in wild and captive populations of a small-bodied primate

Anni Hämäläinen, Melanie Dammhahn, Fabienne Aujard, Manfred Eberle, Isabelle Hardy, Peter M. Kappeler, Martine Perret, Susanne Schliehe-Diecks, Cornelia Kraus & A. Hamalainen
Classic theories of ageing consider extrinsic mortality (EM) a major factor in shaping longevity and ageing, yet most studies of functional ageing focus on species with low EM. This bias may cause overestimation of the influence of senescent declines in performance over condition-dependent mortality on demographic processes across taxa. To simultaneously investigate the roles of functional senescence (FS) and intrinsic, extrinsic and condition-dependent mortality in a species with a high predation risk in nature, we...

Data from: Gradual adaptation of bone structure to aquatic lifestyle in extinct sloths from Peru

Eli Amson, Christian De Muizon, Michel Laurin, Christiane Argot, Vivian De Buffrénil & V. De Buffrenil
Non-pathological densification (osteosclerosis) and swelling (pachyostosis) of bones are the main modifications affecting the skeleton of land vertebrates (tetrapods) that returned to water. However, a precise temporal calibration of the acquisition of such adaptations is still wanting. Here, we assess the timing of such acquisition using the aquatic sloth Thalassocnus, from the Neogene of the Pisco Formation, Peru. This genus is represented by five species occurring in successive vertebrate-bearing horizons of distinct ages. It yields...

Data from: Gene-dosage effects on fitness in recent adaptive duplications: ace-1 in the mosquito Culex pipiens

Pierrick Labbé, Pascal Milesi, André Yébakima, Nicole Pasteur, Mylène Weill & Thomas Lenormand
Gene duplications have long been advocated to contribute to the evolution of new functions. The role of selection in their early spread is more controversial. Unless duplications are favored for a direct benefit of increased expression, they are likely detrimental. In this paper, we investigated the case of duplications favored because they combine already functionally divergent alleles. Their gene-dosage/fitness relations are poorly known, because selection may operate on both overall expression and duplicates relative dosage....

Data from: Mating systems and selection efficacy: a test using chloroplastic sequence data in Angiosperms

Sylvain Glémin & Aline Muyle
Selfing is assumed to reduce selection efficacy, especially purifying selection. This can be tested using molecular data, for example by comparing the Dn/Ds ratio between selfing and outcrossing lineages. So far, little evidence of relaxed selection against weakly deleterious mutations (as inferred by a higher Dn/Ds ratio) in selfers as compared to outcrossers has been found, contrary to the pattern often observed between asexual and sexual lineages. However, few groups have been studied to date....

Data from: Environmental DNA surveillance for invertebrate species: advantages and technical limitations to detect invasive crayfish Procambarus clarkii in freshwater ponds

Anne Tréguier, Jean-Marc Paillisson, Tony Dejean, Alice Valentini, Martin A. Schlaepfer & Jean-Marc Roussel
1. The introduction of non-native species is a major threat to biodiversity. While eradication programs of well-established invaders are costly and hazardous for non-target species, the early detection of a non-native species at low density is critical for preventing biological invasions in recipient ecosystems. Recent studies reveal that environmental DNA (eDNA) is a powerful tool for detecting target species in aquatic ecosystems, but these studies focus mostly on fish and amphibians. 2. We examine the...

Data from: Epistasis and allele specificity in the emergence of a stable polymorphism in Escherichia coli

Jessica Plucain, Thomas Hindré, Mickaël Le Gac, Olivier Tenaillon, Stéphane Cruveiller, Claudine Médigue, Nicholas Leiby, William R. Harcombe, Christopher J. Marx, Richard E. Lenski & Dominique Schneider
Ecological opportunities promote population divergence into coexisting lineages. However, the genetic mechanisms that enable new lineages to exploit these opportunities are poorly understood except in cases of single mutations. We examined how two Escherichia coli lineages diverged from their common ancestor at the outset of a long-term coexistence. By sequencing genomes and reconstructing the genetic history of one lineage, we showed that three mutations together were sufficient to produce the frequency-dependent fitness effects that allowed...

Data from: Overcompensation and phase effects in a cyclic common vole population: between first and second-order cycles

Frédéric Barraquand, Adrien Pinot, Nigel G. Yoccoz & Vincent Bretagnolle
1. Population cycles in voles are often thought to be generated by one-year delayed density-dependence on the annual population growth rate. In common voles, however, it has been suggested by Turchin (2003) that some populations exhibit first-order cycles, resulting from strong overcompensation (i.e. carrying capacity overshoots in peak years, with only an effect of the current year abundance on annual growth rates). 2. We focus on a common vole (Microtus arvalis) population from western France,...

Data from: Global distribution maps of the Leishmaniases

David M. Pigott, Samir Bhatt, Nick Golding, Kirsten A. Duda, Katherine E. Battle, Oliver J. Brady, Jane P. Messina, Yves Balard, Patrick Bastien, Francine Pratlong, John S. Brownstein, Clark C Freifeld, Sumiko R. Mekaru, Peter W. Gething, Dylan B. George, Monica F. Myers, Richard Reithinger & Simon I. Hay
The leishmaniases are vector-borne diseases that have a broad global distribution throughout much of the Americas, Africa and Asia. Despite representing a significant public health burden, our understanding of the global distribution of the leishmaniases remains vague, reliant upon expert opinion and limited to poor spatial resolution. A global assessment of the consensus of evidence for leishmaniasis was performed at a sub-national level by aggregating information from a variety of sources. A database of records...

Data from: Complementarity of statistical treatments to reconstruct worldwide routes of invasion: the case of the Asian ladybird Harmonia axyridis

Eric Lombaert, Thomas Guillemaud, Jonathan Lundgren, Robert Koch, Benoît Facon, Audrey Grez, Antoon Loomans, Thibaut Malausa, Oldrich Nedved, Emma Rhule, Arnstein Staverlokk, Tove Steenberg & Arnaud Estoup
Inferences about introduction histories of invasive species remain challenging because of the stochastic demographic processes involved. Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) can help to overcome these problems, but such method requires a prior understanding of population structure over the study area, necessitating the use of alternative methods and an intense sampling design. In this study, we made inferences about the worldwide invasion history of the ladybird Harmonia axyridis by various population genetics statistical methods, using a...

Data from: Habitat-driven population structure of bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, in the North-East Atlantic

Marie Louis, Amélia Viricel, Tamara Lucas, Hélène Peltier, Eric Alfonsi, Simon Berrow, Andrew Brownlow, Pablo Covelo, Willy Dabin, Rob Deaville, Renaud De Stephanis, François Gally, Pauline Gauffier, Rod Penrose, Monica A. Silva, Christophe Guinet & Benoît Simon-Bouhet
Despite no obvious barrier to gene flow, historical environmental processes and ecological specializations can lead to genetic differentiation in highly mobile animals. Ecotypes emerged in several large mammal species as a result of niche specializations and/or social organization. In the North-West Atlantic, two distinct bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) ecotypes (i.e. ‘coastal’ and ‘pelagic’) have been identified. Here, we investigated the genetic population structure of North-East Atlantic (NEA) bottlenose dolphins on a large scale through the...

Data from: The dynamics of niche evolution upon abrupt environmental change

Romain Gallet, Yasmin Latour, Bradley Stephen Hughes & Thomas Lenormand
Abrupt environmental changes are of particular interest to understand how species can quickly evolve at the boundary of their current niche. In particular the ‘sliding niche’ model, wherein a niche shifts globally toward the new condition, has been utilized in understanding and modeling this process. Here, we investigate the dynamics of relative fitness change in four evolutionary replicates of Escherichia coli populations exposed to an extreme pH shift. We analyzed these changes at generations 500,...

Data from: Reduced survival and reproductive success generates selection pressure for the dengue mosquito Aedes aegypti to evolve resistance against infection by the microsporidian parasite Vavraia culicis

Victoria E. Sy, Philip Agnew, Christine Sidobre & Yannis Michalakis
The success and sustainability of control measures aimed at reducing the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases will depend on how they influence the fitness of mosquitoes in targeted populations. We investigated the effects of the microsporidian parasite Vavraia culicis on the survival, blood-feeding behaviour and reproductive success of female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the main vector of dengue. Infection reduced survival to adulthood and increased adult female mosquito age-dependent mortality relative to uninfected individuals; this additional mortality...

Data from: Bouldering: an alternative strategy to long-vertical climbing in root-climbing hortensias

Carolina Granados Mendoza, Sandrine Isnard, Tristan Charles-Dominique, Jan Van Den Bulcke, Nick P. Rowe, Joris Van Acker, Paul Goetghebeur & Marie-Stéphanie Samain
In the Neotropics, the genus Hydrangea of the popular ornamental hortensia family is represented by climbing species that strongly cling to their support surface by means of adhesive roots closely positioned along specialized anchoring stems. These root-climbing hortensia species belong to the nearly exclusive American Hydrangea section Cornidia and generally are long lianescent climbers that mostly flower and fructify high in the host tree canopy. The Mexican species Hydrangea seemannii, however, encompasses not only long...

Data from: Blacktip reef sharks, Carcharhinus melanopterus, have high genetic structure and varying demographic histories in their Indo-Pacific range

Thomas M. Vignaud, Johann Mourier, Jeffrey A. Maynard, Raphael Leblois, Julia L. Y. Spaet, Eric Clua, Valentina Neglia, Serge Planes & Julia L.Y. Spaet
For free-swimming marine species like sharks, only population genetics and demographic history analyses can be used to assess population health/status as baseline population numbers are usually unknown. We investigated the population genetics of blacktip reef sharks, Carcharhinus melanopterus; one of the most abundant reef-associated sharks and the apex predator of many shallow water reefs of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Our sampling includes 4 widely separated locations in the Indo-Pacific and 11 islands in French...

Data from: How Ebola impacts social dynamics in gorillas: a multistate modelling approach.

Céline Genton, Amandine Pierre, Romane Cristescu, Florence Lévréro, Sylvain Gatti, Jean-Sébastien Pierre, Nelly Ménard & Pascaline Le Gouar
Emerging infectious diseases can induce rapid changes in population dynamics and threaten population persistence. In socially structured populations, the transfers of individuals between social units, e.g. from breeding groups to non-breeding groups, shape population dynamics. We suggest that diseases may affect these crucial transfers. We aimed to determine how disturbance by an emerging disease affects demographic rates of gorillas, especially transfer rates within populations and immigration rates into populations. We compared social dynamics and key...

Data from: Use of RAD sequencing for delimiting species

Eric Pante, Jawad Abdelkrim, Amelia Viricel, Delphine Gey, Scott France, Marie-Catherine Boisselier & Sarah Samadi
RAD-tag sequencing is a promising method for conducting genome-wide evolutionary studies. However, to date, only a handful of studies empirically tested its applicability above the species level. In this communication, we use RAD tags to contribute to the delimitation of species within a diverse genus of deep-sea octocorals, Chrysogorgia, for which few classical genetic markers have proved informative. Previous studies have hypothesized that single mitochondrial haplotypes can be used to delimit Chrysogorgia species. On the...

Data from: Life-history trait database of European reptile species

Annegret Grimm, Ana María Prieto Ramírez, Sylvain Moulherat, Julie Reynaud & Klaus Henle
Life-history data are essential for providing answers to a wide range of questions in evolution, ecology, and conservation biology. While life history data for many species, especially plants, are available online, life history traits of European reptiles are available only widely scattered in different languages and primarily in printed media. For this reason, we generated a comprehensive trait database covering all European reptile species. Data were compiled by searching the peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed literature. The...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    72

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    72

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    72
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    5
  • University of Cambridge
    4
  • University of Montpellier
    4
  • Centre de Biologie et de Gestion des Populations
    4
  • University of Lausanne
    3
  • Paul Sabatier University
    3
  • Centre national de la recherche scientifique
    2
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    2
  • Ghent University
    2