111 Works

Data from: Community-wide scan identifies fish species associated with coral reef services across the Indo-Pacific

Eva Maire, Sébastien Villéger, Nicholas A.J. Graham, Andrew S. Hoey, Joshua Cinner, Sebastian C.A. Ferse, Catherine Aliaume, David J. Booth, David A. Feary, Michel Kulbicki, Stuart A. Sandin, Laurent Vigliola, David Mouillot & Sebastian C. A. Ferse
Determining whether many functionally complementary species or only a subset of key species are necessary to maintain ecosystem functioning and services is a critical question in community ecology and biodiversity conservation. Identifying such key species remains challenging, especially in the tropics where many species co-occur and can potentially support the same or different processes. Here, we developed a new community-wide scan (CWS) approach, analogous to the genome-wide scan, to identify fish species that significantly contribute,...

Data from: Zebra diel migrations reduce encounter risk with lions at night.

Nicolas Courbin, Andrew J. Loveridge, Herve Fritz, David W. Macdonald, Rémi Patin, Marion Valeix & Simon Chamaillé-Jammes
1. Diel migrations (DM; back and forth diel movements along an ecological gradient) undertaken by prey to avoid predators during the day have been demonstrated in many taxa in aquatic ecosystems. In terrestrial ecosystems, prey often shift between various vegetation types whose cover determine their vulnerability (i.e. likelihood of being killed when attacked). 2. We conceptualized that in terrestrial ecosystems DM could also occur, and that the contribution of DM and shifts in vegetation cover...

Data from: Early Plasmodium-induced inflammation does not accelerate aging in mice

Cédric Lippens, Emmanuel Guivier, Sarah E. Reece, Aidan J. O'Donnell, Stephane Cornet, Bruno Faivre & Gabriele Sorci
Aging is associated with a decline of performance leading to reduced reproductive output and survival. While the antagonistic pleiotropy theory of aging has attracted considerable attention, the molecular/physiological functions underlying the early-life benefits/late-life costs paradigm remain elusive. We tested the hypothesis that while early activation of the inflammatory response confers benefits in terms of protection against infection, it also incurs costs in terms of reduced reproductive output at old age, and shortened longevity. We infected...

Data from: Stabilizing selection, mutational bias and the evolution of sex

Eloïse Vanhoenacker, Linnéa Sandell & Denis Roze
Stabilizing selection around a fixed phenotypic optimum is expected to disfavor sexual reproduction, since asexually reproducing organisms can maintain a higher fitness at equilibrium, while sex disrupts combinations of compensatory mutations. This conclusion rests on the assumption that mutational effects on phenotypic traits are unbiased, that is, mutation does not tend to push phenotypes in any particular direction. In this paper, we consider a model of stabilizing selection acting on an arbitrary number of polygenic...

Data from: Demographic inferences after a range expansion can be biased: the test case of the blacktip reef shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus)

Pierpaolo Maisano Delser, Shannon Corrigan, Drew Duckett, Arnaud Suwalski, Michel Veuille, Serge Planes, Gavin J.P. Naylor & Stefano Mona
The evolutionary history of species is a dynamic process as they modify, expand and contract their spatial distributions over time. Range expansions (REs) occur through a series of founder events that are followed by migration among neighbouring demes. The process usually results in structured metapopulations and leaves a distinct signature in the genetic variability of species. Explicitly modeling the consequences of complex demographic events such as REs is computationally very intensive. Here we propose an...

Data from: Body condition influences ontogeny of foraging behavior in juvenile southern elephant seals

Florian Orgeret, Sam L. Cox, Henri Weimerskirch & Christophe Guinet
1. Ontogeny of diving and foraging behaviour in marine top predators is poorly understood despite its importance in population recruitment. This lack of knowledge is partly due to the difficulties of monitoring juveniles in the wild, which is linked to high mortality early in life. 2. Pinnipeds are good models for studying the development of foraging behaviours because juveniles are large enough to robustly carry tracking devices for many months. Moreover, parental assistance is absent...

Data from: Bat overpasses: an insufficient solution to restore habitat connectivity across roads

Fabien Claireau, Yves Bas, Sébastien J. Puechmaille, Jean-François Julien, Benjamin Allegrini & Christian Kerbiriou
1. Roads have many negative effects on wildlife, including their role in habitat fragmentation. Habitat fragmentation affects bats during their daily movements between roosts and foraging areas. As bats are protected in Europe, developers must implement specific mitigation measures that are hierarchically structured to achieve a null net impact. However, very few specific mitigation measures have been undertaken specifically for bats. Bat overpasses are among proposed improvements intended to reduce the impact of roads, but...

Data from: Effects of interspecific coexistence on laying date and clutch size in two closely related species of hole‐nesting birds

Anders Pape Møller, Javier Balbontin, André A. Dhondt, Vladimir Remeš, Frank Adriaensen, Clotilde Biard, Jordi Camprodon, Mariusz Cichoń, Blandine Doligez, Anna Dubiec, Marcel Eens, Tapio Eeva, Anne E. Goodenough, Andrew G. Gosler, Lars Gustafsson, Philipp Heeb, Shelley A. Hinsley, Staffan Jacob, Rimvydas Juškaitis, Toni Laaksonen, Bernard Leclercq, Bruno Massa, Tomasz D. Mazgajski, Rudi G. Nager, Jan-Åke Nilsson … & Ruedi G. Nager
Coexistence between great tits Parus major and blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus, but also other hole‐nesting taxa, constitutes a classic example of species co‐occurrence resulting in potential interference and exploitation competition for food and for breeding and roosting sites. However, the spatial and temporal variations in coexistence and its consequences for competition remain poorly understood. We used an extensive database on reproduction in nest boxes by great and blue tits based on 87 study plots across...

Data from: No evidence for prezygotic postcopulatory avoidance of kin despite high inbreeding depression

Pauline Vuarin, Alice Bouchard, Loïc Lesobre, Gwènaëlle Levêque, Toni Chalah, Michel Saint Jalme, Frédéric Lacroix, Yves Hingrat & Gabriele Sorci
Offspring resulting from mating among close relatives can suffer from impaired fitness through the expression of recessive alleles with deleterious effects. Post-copulatory sperm selection (a pre-zygotic mechanism of cryptic female choice) has been suggested to be an effective way to avoid inbreeding. To investigate whether post-copulatory female choice allows avoiding fertilization by close kin, we performed artificial inseminations in a promiscuous bird, the houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata undulata). Females were inseminated with a mix of...

Data from: Evolution without standing genetic variation: change in transgenerational plastic response under persistent predation pressure

Arnaud Sentis, Raphaël Bertram, Nathalie Dardenne, Felipe Ramon-Portugal, Gilles Espinasse, Ines Louit, Lucie Negri, Elena Haeler, Thomas Ashkar, Théo Pannetier, James Cunningham, Christoph Grunau, Gaël Le Trionnaire, Jean-Christophe Simon, Alexandra Margo, Benoit Pujol, Jean-Louis Hemptinne & Etienne Danchin
Transgenerational phenotypic plasticity is a fast nongenetic response to environmental modifications that can buffer the effects of environmental stresses on populations. However, little is known about the evolution of plasticity in the absence of standing genetic variation although several nongenetic inheritance mechanisms have now been identified. Here, we monitored the pea aphid transgenerational phenotypic response to ladybird predators (production of winged offspring) during 27 generations of experimental evolution in the absence of initial genetic variation...

Data from: Giant coral reef fishes display markedly different susceptibility to night spearfishing

Alan R. Pearse, Richard J. Hamilton, John Howard Choat, John Pita, Glenn Almany, Nate Peterson, Grant S. Hamilton & Erin E. Peterson
The humphead wrasse (Cheilinus undulatus) and bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) are two of the largest, most iconic fishes of Indo-Pacific coral reefs. Both species form prized components of subsistence and commercial fisheries and are vulnerable to overfishing. C. undulatus is listed as Endangered and B. muricatum as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. We investigated how night spearfishing pressure and habitat associations affected both species in a relatively lightly exploited setting; the...

Data from: Reduction of baseline corticosterone secretion correlates with climate warming and drying across wild lizard populations

Andréaz Dupoué, Alexis Rutschmann, Jean F. Le Galliard, Jean Clobert, Pauline Blaimont, Barry Sinervo, Donald B. Miles, Claudy Haussy & Sandrine Meylan
1. Climate change should lead to massive loss of biodiversity in most taxa but the detailed physiological mechanisms underlying population extinction remain largely elusive so far. In vertebrates, baseline levels of hormones such as glucocorticoids (GCs) may be indicators of population state since their secretion to chronic stress can impair survival and reproduction. However, the relationship between GC secretion, climate change and population extinction risk remains unclear. 2. In this study we investigated whether levels...

Data from: Hurricane-induced selection on the morphology of an island lizard

Colin M. Donihue, Anthony Herrel, Anne-Claire Fabre, Ambika Kamath, Anthony J. Geneva, Thomas W. Schoener, Jason J. Kolbe & Jonathan B. Losos
Hurricanes are catastrophically destructive. Beyond their toll on human life and livelihoods, hurricanes have massive and often long-lasting effects on ecological systems. Despite many examples of mass mortality events following hurricanes, hurricane-induced natural selection has never been demonstrated. Immediately after we finished a survey of Anolis scriptus, a common, small-bodied lizard found throughout the Turks and Caicos archipelago, our study populations were battered by Hurricanes Irma and Maria. Shortly thereafter, we revisited the populations to...

Data from: Transcriptome response of the foundation plant Spartina alterniflora to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Mariano F Alvarez, Julie Ferreira De Carvalho, Armel Salmon, Malika L. Ainouche, Armand Cavé-Radet, Abdelhak El Amrani, Tammy E. Foster, Sydney Moyer, Christina L. Richards & Mariano Alvarez
Despite the severe impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the foundation plant species Spartina alterniflora proved resilient to heavy oiling, providing an opportunity to identify mechanisms of response to the anthropogenic stress of crude oil exposure. We assessed plants from oil affected and unaffected populations using a custom DNA microarray to identify genome-wide transcription patterns and gene expression networks that respond to crude oil exposure. Additionally, we used T-DNA insertion lines of the model...

Data from: Functional connectivity in replicated urban landscapes in the land snail (Cornu aspersum)

Manon Balbi, Aude Ernoult, Pedro Poli, Luc Madec, Annie Guiller, Marie-Claire Martin, Jean Nabucet, Véronique Petit Beaujouan & Eric J. Petit
Urban areas are highly fragmented and thereby exert strong constraints on individual dispersal. Despite this, some species manage to persist in urban areas, such as the garden snail, Cornu aspersum, which is common in cityscapes despite its low mobility. Using landscape genetic approaches, we combined study area replication and multi-scale analysis to determine how landscape composition, configuration, and connectivity influence snail dispersal across urban areas. At the overall landscape scale, areas with a high percentage...

Data from: Correlates of complete brood failure in blue tits: could extra-pair mating provide unexplored benefits to females?

Adèle Mennerat, Anne Charmantier, Christian Jørgensen & Sigrunn Eliassen
Behavioural ecologists have for decades investigated the adaptive value of extra-pair copulation (EPC) for females of socially monogamous species. Despite extensive effort testing for genetic benefits, there now seems to be a consensus that the so-called ‘good genes’ effects are at most weak. In parallel the search for direct benefits has mostly focused on the period surrounding egg laying, thus neglecting potential correlates of EPC that might be expressed at later stages in the breeding...

Data from: The influence of early-life allocation to antlers on male performance during adulthood: evidence from contrasted populations of a large herbivore

Jean-François Lemaître, Louise Cheynel, Frederic Douhard, Gilles Bourgoin, François Débias, Hubert Ferté, Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont, Sylvia Pardonnet, Maryline Pellerin, Benjamin Rey, Cécile Vanpé, A.J. Mark Hewison, Jean-Michel Gaillard & A. J. Mark Hewison
1. To secure mating opportunities, males often develop and maintain conspicuous traits that are involved in intra-sexual and/or inter-sexual competition. While current models of sexual selection rely on the assumption that producing such traits is costly, quantifying the cost of allocating to secondary sexual traits remains challenging. 2. According to the principle of allocation, high energy allocation to growth or sexual traits in males should lead to reduced energy allocation to the maintenance of cellular...

Data from: Pathogeography: leveraging the biogeography of human infectious diseases for global health management

Kris A. Murray, Jesús Olivero, Benjamin Roche, Sonia Tiedt & Jean-François Guégan
Biogeography is an implicit and fundamental component of almost every dimension of modern biology, from natural selection and speciation to invasive species and biodiversity management. However, biogeography has rarely been integrated into human or veterinary medicine nor routinely leveraged for global health management. Here we review the theory and application of biogeography to the research and management of human infectious diseases, an integration we refer to as ‘pathogeography’. Pathogeography represents a promising framework for understanding...

Data from: Elevation related difference in serial reversal learning ability in a non-scatter hoarding passerine

Ethan Hermer, Maxime Cauchoix, Alexis S. Chaine & Julie Morand-Ferron
Environments characterized by scarce and variable food supply, termed ‘harsh environments’, have been hypothesized to favor cognitive abilities that aid an animal in finding food, remembering where it is located, or predicting its availability. Most studies of the ‘harsh environment’ hypothesis have found that scatter hoarders from harsher environments have better spatial memory abilities, but few studies have looked at this hypothesis in non-scatter hoarders. Here we present the first comparison of performance on a...

Data from: Let the most motivated win: resource value components affect contest outcome in a parasitoid wasp

Anthony G.E. Mathiron, Patrice Pottier, Marlène Goubault & Anthony G E Mathiron
Studying physical contests for indivisible resources is a major theme in behavioral ecology. Intensity (aggressiveness) and outcome of such contests may be influenced by individual abilities to gain and keep the resource (Resource Holding Potential, RHP), but also by the value they place in the resource (Resource Value, RV). Contestants can assess resource quality directly (objective RV) or estimate it according to their physiological status and their experience (subjective RV). In some parasitoid species, adult...

Data from: Effect of pollination strategy, phylogeny and distribution on pollination niches of Euro-Mediterranean orchids

Nina Joffard, Francois Massol, Matthias Grenié, Claudine Montgelard & Bertrand Schatz
1. Pollination niches are important components of ecological niches and have played a major role in the diversification of Angiosperms. In this study, we focused on Euro-Mediterranean orchids, which use diverse pollination strategies and interact with various functional groups of insects. In these orchids, we investigated the determinants of pollination niche breadth and overlap by analysing the orchid-pollinator network and the factors that may have shaped it. 2. We constructed a database reporting 1278 interactions...

Data from: Patterns of phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation in the wide elevation range of the alpine plant Arabis alpina

Pierre De Villemereuil, Médéric Mouterde, Oscar E. Gaggiotti & Irène Till-Bottraud
Local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity are two important characteristics of alpine plants to overcome the threats caused by global changes. Among alpine species, Arabis alpina is characterised by an unusually wide altitudinal amplitude, ranging from 800 to 3,100 m of elevation in the French Alps. Two non‐exclusive hypotheses can explain the presence of A. alpina across this broad ecological gradient: adaptive phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation, making this species especially useful to better understand these...

Data from: Behavioral elements and sensory cues involved in sexual isolation between Drosophila melanogaster strains

Micheline Grillet, Jean-François Ferveur & Claude Everaerts
Sensory cues exchanged during courtship are crucial for mate choice: if they show intraspecific divergence this may cause or reinforce sexual isolation between strains, ultimately leading to speciation. There is a strong asymmetric sexual isolation between Drosophila melanogaster females from Zimbabwe (Z) and males from all other populations (M). While M and Z flies of both sexes show different cuticular pheromones, this variation is only partly responsible for the intraspecific isolation effect. Male acoustic signals...

Data from: Partitioning genetic and species diversity refines our understanding of species-genetic diversity relationships

Vera W Pfeiffer, Brett M Ford, Johann Housset, Audrey McCombs, José L Blanco-Pastor, Nicolas Gouin, Stephanie Manel & Angéline Bertin
Illuminating the origin of species-genetic diversity correlations (SGDCs) is a challenging task that has sparked a lot of interest. Genetic and species diversity are comprised by components that respond differently to the same ecological processes. Thus, it can be useful to partition species and genetic diversity into their different components to infer the mechanisms behind SGDCs. In this study, we applied such an approach using a high-elevation Andean wetland system, where previous evidence identified neutral...

Data from: Sequence analysis of European maize inbred line F2 provides new insights into molecular and chromosomal characteristics of presence/absence variants

Aude Darracq, Clémentine Vitte, Stéphane Nicolas, Jorge Duarte, Jean-Philippe Pichon, Tristan Mary-Huard, Céline Chevalier, Aurélie Bérard, Marie-Christine Le Paslier, Peter Rogowsky, Alain Charcosset & Johann Joets
Maize is well known for its exceptional structural diversity, including copy number variants (CNVs) and presence/absence variants (PAVs), and there is growing evidence for the role of structural variation in maize adaptation. While PAVs have been described in this important crop species, the extent of presence/absence variation and the relative position of inbred-specific regions remain to be elucidated. De novo genome sequencing of the F2 maize inbred line which played a key role in European...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    111

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    111

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    111
  • Sorbonne University
    9
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    5
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    5
  • Paul Sabatier University
    5
  • University of Glasgow
    4
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    3
  • University of Antwerp
    3
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • University of Pretoria
    2