72 Works

Data from: One-locus-several-primers: a strategy to improve the taxonomic and haplotypic coverage in diet metabarcoding studies

Emmanuel Corse, Christelle Tougard, Gaït Archambaud-Suard, Jean-François Agnèse, Françoise D. Messu Mandeng, Charles F. Bilong Bilong, David Duneau, Lucie Zinger, Rémi Chappaz, Charles C. Y. Xu, Emese Meglécz & Vincent Dubut
In diet metabarcoding analyses, insufficient taxonomic coverage of PCR primer sets generates false negatives that may dramatically distort biodiversity estimates. In this paper, we investigated the taxonomic coverage and complementarity of three cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI) primer sets based on in silico analyses and we conducted an in vivo evaluation using fecal and spider web samples from different invertivores, environments, and geographic locations. Our results underline the lack of predictability of both...

Phase-Based Antarctica Ice Velocity Map

Jeremie Mouginot, Eric Rignot & Bernd Scheuchl
Complete map of ice motion in Antarctica combining phase data in the interior and speckle tracking in the fast-moving sectors. We present a new map of Antarctic ice velocity that is ten times more precise than prior maps and reveals ice motion at a high precision over 80% of the continent versus 20% in the past. The ice motion vector map provides novel constrains on interior ice motion and its connection with the glaciers and...

The two oxpecker species reveal the role of movement rates and foraging intensity in species coexistence

Guillaume PERON, Christophe Bonenfant, Roxanne Gagnon & Cheryl Mabika
The two Buphagus oxpecker species are specialized passerines that forage for ticks and other food particles on the body of ungulates in the African savannas. One of their intriguing features is their ability to coexist despite sharing the same, specialized diet. Using co-occurrence data (photographs of giraffes with oxpeckers on them) and Approximate Bayesian Computing, we demonstrate that yellow-billed oxpeckers changed host faster than red-billed oxpeckers and appeared to displace red-billed oxpeckers from preferred giraffe...

Data from: How neighbourhood interactions control the temporal stability and resilience to drought of trees in mountain forests

Marion Jourdan, Georges Kunstler & Xavier Morin
1. Over the coming decades, the predicted increase in frequency and intensity of extreme events such as droughts is likely to have a strong effect on forest functioning. Recent studies have shown that species mixing may buffer the temporal variability of productivity. However, most studies have focused on temporal stability of productivity, while species mixing may also affect forest resilience to extreme events. Our understanding of mechanisms underlying species mixing effects on forest stability and...

Data from: Water availability and temperature induce changes in oxidative status during pregnancy in a viviparous lizard

Andréaz Dupoué, Pauline Blaimont, David Rozen-Rechels, Murielle Richard, Sandrine Meylan, Jean Clobert, Donald Miles, Rémi Martin, Beatriz Decencière, Simon Agostini & Jean-François Le Galliard
Reproduction involves considerable reorganization in an organism’s physiology that incurs potential toxicity for cells (e.g., oxidative stress) and decrease in fitness. This framework has been the cornerstone of the so-called ‘oxidative cost of reproduction’, a theory that remains controversial and relatively overlooked in non-model ectotherms. Here, we used two complementary approaches in natural and controlled conditions to test whether altered access to climate conditions (water and temperature resources) alters oxidative status and mediates reproductive trade-offs...

Data from: Biotic and abiotic drivers of species loss rate in isolated lakes

Céline Bellard, Göran Englund & Bernard Hugueny
1. Today, anthropogenic impacts are causing a serious crisis for global biodiversity, with rates of extinction increasing at an unprecedented rate. Extinctions typically occur after a certain delay and understanding the mechanisms causing delays is a key challenge for both fundamental and applied perspectives. 2. Here, we make use of natural experiments, the isolation of lakes by land up-lift in Northern Scandinavia, to examine how yearly extinction rates are affected by time since isolation and...

Data from: Female reproduction bears no survival cost in captivity for grey mouse lemurs

Julie Landes, Pierre-Yves Henry, Isablle Hardy, Martine Perret & Samuel Pavard
The survival cost of reproduction has been revealed in many free-ranging vertebrates. However, recent studies on captive populations failed to detect this cost. Theoretically, this lack of survival/reproduction trade-off is expected when resources are not limiting, but these studies may have failed to detect the cost, as they may not have fully accounted for potential confounding effects, in particular inter-individual heterogeneity. Here we investigated the effects of current and past reproductive effort on later survival...

Data from: A functional diversity approach of crop sequences reveals that weed diversity and abundance show different responses to environmental variability

Lucie Mahaut, Sabrina Gaba & Guillaume Fried
1. Combining several crop species and associated agricultural practices in a crop sequence has the potential to control weed abundance while promoting weed diversity in arable fields. However, how the variability of environmental conditions that arise from crop sequences affects weed diversity and abundance remains poorly understood, with most studies to-date simply opposing weed communities in monoculture and in crop rotation. Here, we describe crop sequences along gradients of disturbance and resource variability using a...

Data from: Na+/K+‐ATPase gene duplications in clitellate annelids are associated with freshwater colonization

Kevin M. Horn, Bronwyn W. Williams, Christer Erséus, Kenneth M. Halanych, Scott R. Santos, Michel Des Châtelliers Creuzé & Frank E. Anderson
Major habitat transitions, such as those from marine to freshwater habitats or from aquatic to terrestrial habitats, have occurred infrequently in animal evolution and may represent a barrier to diversification. Identifying genomic events associated with these transitions can help us better understand mechanisms that allow animals to cross these barriers and diversify in new habitats. Study of the Capitella telata and Helobdella robusta genomes allows examination of one such habitat transition (marine to freshwater) in...

Data from: Resting metabolic rate in migratory and non-migratory geese following range expansion; go south, go low

Götz Eichhorn, Manfred R. Enstipp, Jean-Yves Georges, Dennis Hasselquist & Bart A. Nolet
While many species suffer from human activities, some like geese benefit and may show range expansions. In some cases geese (partially) gave up migration and started breeding at wintering and stopover grounds. Range expansion may be facilitated and accompanied by physiological changes, especially when associated with changes in migratory behaviour. Interspecific comparisons found that migratory tendency is associated with a higher basal or resting metabolic rate (RMR). We compared RMR of individuals belonging to a...

Data from: Some like it dry: water restriction overrides heterogametic sex determination in two reptiles

Andréaz Dupoué, Olivier Lourdais, Sandrine Meylan, François Brischoux, Frédéric Angelier, David Rozen-Rechels, Yoan Marcangeli, Beatriz Decencière, Simon Agostini & Jean-Francois Le Galliard
The evolution of sex determination is complex and yet crucial in our understanding of population stability. In ectotherms, sex determination involves a variety of mechanisms including genetic determination (GSD), environment determination (ESD), but also interactions between the two via sex reversal. In this study, we investigated whether water deprivation during pregnancy could override GSD in two heterogametic squamate reptiles. We demonstrated that water restriction in early gestation induced a male-biased secondary sex ratio in both...

Cocoa agroforest multifunctionality and soil fertility explained by shade tree litter traits

Marie Sauvadet, Stéphane Saj, Grégoire Freschet, Jean-Daniel Essobo, Séguy Enock, Thierry Becquer, Philippe Tixier & Jean-Michel Harmand
Manipulating plant functional diversity to improve agroecosystem multifunctionality is a central challenge of agricultural systems worldwide. In cocoa agroforestry systems (cAFS), shade trees are used to supply many services to farmers, yet their impact on soil functioning and cocoa yields is likely to vary substantially among tree species. Here, we compared the impact of five shade tree species (Canarium schweinfurthii (Canarium), Dacryoides edulis (Safou), Milicia excelsa (Iroko), Ceiba pentandra (Kapok tree), Albizia adianthifolia (Albizia)) and...

Cassini RPWS Jupiter Encounter Calibrated Dataset

Philippe Zarka & Baptiste Cecconi
This dataset contains calibrated Cassini-RPWS-HFR Jupiter fly-by data from 6 months of Jupiter encounter: 2000-275 (Oct 1st) 00:00 to 2001-090 (Mar 31st) 24:00. The spectral range covers 3.5 kHz to 16 MHz. The data is available in CDF format. Processing routines are provided in IDL and Python.

Data from: Nonlinear phenotypic variation uncovers the emergence of heterosis in Arabidopsis thaliana

François Vasseur, Louise Fouqueau, Dominique De Vienne, Thibault Nidelet, Cyrille Violle & Detlef Weigel
Heterosis describes the phenotypic superiority of hybrids over their parents in traits related to agronomic performance and fitness. Understanding and predicting nonadditive inheritance such as heterosis is crucial for evolutionary biology as well as for plant and animal breeding. However, the physiological bases of heterosis remain debated. Moreover, empirical data in various species have shown that diverse genetic and molecular mechanisms are likely to explain heterosis, making it difficult to predict its emergence and amplitude...

Data from: From groups to communities in western lowland gorillas

Giovanni Forcina, Dominique Vallet, Pascaline J. Le Gouar, Rubén Bernardo-Madrid, Germán Illera, Guillem Molina-Vacas, Stéphane Dréano, Eloy Revilla, José Domingo Rodríguez-Tejeiro, Nelly Ménard, Magdalena Bermejo, Carles Vilà & José Domingo Rodríguez-Teijeiro
Social networks are the result of interactions between individuals at different temporal scales. Thus, sporadic intergroup encounters and individual forays play a central role in defining the dynamics of populations in social species. We assessed the rate of intergroup encounters for three western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) groups with daily observations over five years, and noninvasively genotyped a larger population over four months. Both approaches revealed a social system much more dynamic than anticipated,...

Data from: Numerical cognition in honeybees enables addition and subtraction

Scarlett R. Howard, Aurore Avarguès-Weber, Jair E. Garcia, Andrew D. Greentree & Adrian G. Dyer
Many animals understand numbers at a basic level for use in essential tasks such as foraging, shoaling, and resource management. However, complex arithmetic operations, such as addition and subtraction, using symbols and/or labeling have only been demonstrated in a limited number of nonhuman vertebrates. We show that honeybees, with a miniature brain, can learn to use blue and yellow as symbolic representations for addition or subtraction. In a free-flying environment, individual bees used this information...

Data from: The interplay of landscape composition and configuration: new pathways to manage functional biodiversity and agro-ecosystem services across Europe

Emily A. Martin, Matteo Dainese, Yann Clough, András Báldi, Riccardo Bommarco, Vesna Gagic, Michael Garratt, Andrea Holzschuh, David Kleijn, Anikó Kovács-Hostyánszki, Lorenzo Marini, Simon G. Potts, Henrik G. Smith, Diab Al Hassan, Matthias Albrecht, Georg K. S. Andersson, Josep Asis, Stephanie Aviron, Mario Balzan, Laura Baños-Picón, Ignasi Bartomeus, Peter Batary, Françoise Burel, Berta Caballero-López, Elena D. Concepcion … & Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter
Managing agricultural landscapes to support biodiversity and ecosystem services is a key aim of a sustainable agriculture. However, how the spatial arrangement of crop fields and other habitats in landscapes impacts arthropods and their functions is poorly known. Synthesising data from 49 studies (1515 landscapes) across Europe, we examined effects of landscape composition (% habitats) and configuration (edge density) on arthropods in fields and their margins, pest control, pollination and yields. Configuration effects interacted with...

Data from: Nutrient starvation impairs the trophic plasticity of reef-building corals under ocean warming

Leïla Ezzat, Jean-François Maguer, Renaud Grover, Cécile Rottier, Pascale Tremblay, Christine Ferrier-Pagès & Jean‐François Maguer
1) Global warming of the world’s oceans is driving reef-building corals towards their upper thermal limit, inducing bleaching, nutrient starvation and mortality. In addition, corals are predicted to experience large fluctuations in seawater nutrient concentrations, following water column stratification or eutrophication problems, which can further alter their nutritional capacities and ultimately their resilience to global change. 2) We investigated the effect of thermal stress and dissolved inorganic nutrient (DINUT) availability on the auto- and heterotrophic...

Data from: Unveiling tipping points in long-term ecological records from Sphagnum-dominated peatlands

Mariusz Lamentowicz, Mariusz Gałka, Katarzyna Marcisz, Michał Słowiński, Kajukało-Drygalska Kajukało, Milva Druguet Dayras & Vincent E.J. Jassey
Unveiling past tipping points is a prerequisite for a better understanding of how individual species and entire ecosystems will respond to future climate change. Such knowledge is key for the implementation of biodiversity conservation. We identify the relationships between peatland vegetation and hydrological conditions over the past 2000 years using macrofossils, testate amoebae-based quantitative hydrological reconstructions, and Sphagnum-moss functional traits from seven Polish peatland records. Using threshold indicator taxa analysis (TITAN), we discovered that plant...

Data from: Repeated evolution of asymmetric genitalia and right-sided mating behavior in the Drosophila nannoptera species group

Andrea E. Acurio, Flor T. Rhebergen, Sarah E. Paulus, Virginie Courtier-Orgogozo & Michael Lang
Background: Male genitals have repeatedly evolved left-right asymmetries, and the causes of such evolution remain unclear. The Drosophila nannoptera group contains four species, among which three exhibit left-right asymmetries of distinct genital organs. In the most studied species, Drosophila pachea, males display asymmetric genital lobes and they mate right-sided on top of the female. Copulation position of the other species is unknown. Results: To assess whether the evolution of genital asymmetry could be linked to...

Data from: Integrating reproductive phenology in Ecological Niche Models changed the predicted future ranges of a marine invader

Rosa M. Chefaoui, Alexandra Serebryakova, Aschwin H. Engelen, Frédérique Viard & Ester A. Serrao
Aim: Phenology of a wide diversity of organisms has a dependency on climate, usually with reproductive periods beginning earlier in the year and lasting longer at lower latitudes. Temperature and day length are known environmental drivers of the reproductive timing of many species. Hence, reproductive phenology is sensitive to warming and is important to be considered for reliable predictions of species distributions. This is particularly relevant for rapidly spreading non-indigenous species (NIS). In this study,...

Data from: Changing landscapes of Southeast Asia and rodent-borne diseases: decreased diversity but increased transmission risks

Serge Morand, Kim Blasdell, Frédéric Bordes, Philippe Buchy, Bernard Carcy, Kittipong Chaisiri, Yannick Chaval, Julien Claude, Jean-François Cosson, Marc Desquesnes, Sathaporn Jittapalapong, Tawisa Jiyipong, Anamika Karnchanabanthoen, Pumhom Pornpan, Jean-Marc Rolain & Annelise Tran
The reduction in biodiversity through land use changes due to urbanization and agricultural intensification, appears linked to major epidemiological changes in many human diseases. Increasing disease risks and the emergence of novel pathogens appear to result from increased contact between wildlife, domesticated animals and humans. We investigate how increasing human domination of the environment may favor generalist and synanthropic rodent species and affect the diversity and prevalence of rodent-borne pathogens in Southeast Asia, a hotspot...

Data from: Intraspecific and interspecific trait variability in tadpole metacommunities from the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest

Mainara Xavier Jordani, Nicolas Mouquet, Lilian Casatii, Marcelo Menin, Denise De Cerqueira Rossa-Feres & Cécile H. Albert
1. A better understanding of species coexistence and community dynamics may benefit from more insights on trait variability at the individual and species levels. 2. Tadpole assemblages offer an excellent system to understand the relative influence of intra- and interspecific variability on community assembly, due to their high phenotypic plasticity, and the strong influence that environmental variables have on their spatial distribution and individual performance. 3. Here we quantified the intra- and interspecific components of...

Data from: Habitat diversity associated with island size and environmental filtering control the species richness of rock-savanna plants in neotropical inselbergs

Ludovic Henneron, Corinne Sarthou, Jean-Christophe De Massary & Jean-François Ponge
Disentangling the multiple factors controlling species diversity is a major challenge in ecology. Island biogeography and environmental filtering are two influential theories emphasizing respectively island size and isolation, and the abiotic environment, as key drivers of species richness. However, few attempts have been made to quantify their relative importance and investigate their mechanistic basis. Here, we applied structural equation modelling, a powerful method allowing test of complex hypotheses involving multiple and indirect effects, on an...

Data from: Genetic population structure and demography of an apex predator, the tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier

Agathe Pirog, Sebastien Jaquemet, Virginie Ravigné, Geremy Cliff, Eric Clua, Bonnie J. Holmes, Nigel E. Hussey, John E.G. Nevill, Andrew J. Temple, Per Berggren, Laurent Vigliola & Hélène Magalon
Population genetics have been increasingly applied to study large sharks over the last decade. Whilst large shark species are often difficult to study with direct methods, improved knowledge is needed for both population management and conservation, especially for species vulnerable to anthropogenic and climatic impacts. The tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, is an apex predator known to play important direct and indirect roles in tropical and sub-tropical marine ecosystems. While the global and Indo-West Pacific population...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    72

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    72

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    72
  • PSL Research University
    3
  • Laboratory Evolution and Biological Diversity
    3
  • University of Montpellier
    3
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    2
  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    2
  • Lund University
    2
  • Institut de Systématique, Évolution, Biodiversité
    2
  • Institut de Recherche pour le Développement
    2
  • University of Gothenburg
    2