3 Works

Data from: Into the light: diurnality has evolved multiple times in geckos

Tony Gamble, Eli Greenbaum, Todd R. Jackman & Aaron M. Bauer
Geckos are the only major lizard group consisting mostly of nocturnal species. Nocturnality is presumed to have evolved early in gecko evolution and geckos possess numerous adaptations to functioning in low light and at low temperatures. However, not all gecko species are nocturnal and most diurnal geckos have their own distinct adaptations to living in warmer, sunlit environments. We reconstructed the evolution of gecko activity patterns using a newly generated time-calibrated phylogeny. Our results provide...

Data from: Phylogenetic distribution of symbiotic bacteria from Panamanian amphibians that inhibit growth of the lethal fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

Matthew H. Becker, Jenifer B. Walke, Lindsey Murrill, Douglas C. Woodhams, Laura K. Reinert, Louise A. Rollins-Smith, Elizabeth A. Burzynski, Thomas P. Umile, Kevin P. C. Minbiole & Lisa K. Belden
The introduction of next-generation sequencing has allowed for greater understanding of community composition of symbiotic microbial communities. However, determining the function of individual members of these microbial communities still largely relies on culture-based methods. Here, we present results on the phylogenetic distribution of a defensive functional trait of cultured symbiotic bacteria associated with amphibians. Amphibians are host to a diverse community of cutaneous bacteria and some of these bacteria protect their host from the lethal...

Data from: Polyandrous females provide sons with more competitive sperm: support for the sexy-sperm hypothesis in the rattlebox moth (Utetheisa ornatrix)

Andrea L. Egan, Kristin A. Hook, H. Kern Reeve & Vikram K. Iyengar
Given the costs of multiple-mating, why has female polyandry evolved? Utetheisa ornatrix moths are well-suited for studying multiple mating in females because females are highly polyandrous over their lifespan, with each male mate transferring a substantial spermatophore with both genetic and non-genetic material. The accumulation of resources might explain the prevalence of polyandry in this species, but another, not mutually-exclusive, possibility is that females mate multiply to increase the probability that their sons will inherit...

Registration Year

  • 2015
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Villanova University
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • Virginia Tech
    1
  • Vanderbilt University
    1
  • Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
    1
  • The University of Texas at El Paso
    1
  • University of Massachusetts Boston
    1
  • Cornell University
    1