32 Works

Data from: Immanent conditions determine imminent collapses: nutrient regimes define the resilience of macroalgal communities

Jordi Boada, Rohan Arthur, David Alonso, Jordi F. Pagès, Albert Pessarrodona, Silvia Oliva, Giulia Ceccherelli, Luigi Piazzi, Javier Romero & Teresa Alcoverro
Predicting where state-changing thresholds lie can be inherently complex in ecosystems characterized by nonlinear dynamics. Unpacking the mechanisms underlying these transitions can help considerably reduce this unpredictability. We used empirical observations, field and laboratory experiments, and mathematical models to examine how differences in nutrient regimes mediate the capacity of macrophyte communities to sustain sea urchin grazing. In relatively nutrient-rich conditions, macrophyte systems were more resilient to grazing, shifting to barrens beyond 1 800 g m−2...

Data from: Extreme genetic structure in a social bird species despite high dispersal capacity

Francisco Morinha, José A. Dávila, Bastos Estela, João A. Cabral, Óscar Frías, José L. González, Paulo Travassos, Diogo Carvalho, Borja Milá & Guillermo Blanco
Social barriers have been shown to reduce gene flow and contribute to genetic structure among populations in species with high cognitive capacity and complex societies, such as cetaceans, apes and humans. In birds, high dispersal capacity is thought to prevent population divergence unless major geographic or habitat barriers induce isolation patterns by dispersal, colonization or adaptation limitation. We report that Iberian populations of the red-billed chough, a social, gregarious corvid with high dispersal capacity, show...

Data from: Host nest site choice depends on risk of cuckoo parasitism in magpie hosts

Mónica Expósito-Granados, Deseada Parejo, Juan Gabriel Martínez, Marta Precioso, Mercedes Molina-Morales & Jesús M. Avilés
Avian brood parasites impose large fitness costs on their hosts and, thus, brood parasitism has selected for an array of host defensive mechanisms to avoid them. So far most studies have focused on antiparasite defenses operating at the egg and chick stages and neglected defenses that may work prior to parasite egg deposition. Here, we experimentally explore the possibility that hosts, as part of a front-line defense, might minimize parasitism costs through informed nest site...

Data from: Agriculture shapes the trophic niche of a bat preying on multiple pest arthropods across Europe: evidence from DNA metabarcoding

Ostaizka Aizpurua, Ivana Budinski, Panagiotis Georgiakakis, Shyam Gopalakrishnan, Carlos Ibáñez, Vanessa Mata, Hugo Rebelo, Danilo Russo, Farkas Szodoray-Parádi, Violeta Zhelyazkova, Vida Zrncic, M. Thomas P. Gilbert & Antton Alberdi
The interaction between agricultural production and wildlife can shape, and even condition, the functioning of both systems. In this study we i) explored the degree to which a widespread European bat, namely the common bent-wing bat Miniopterus schreibersii, consumes crop-damaging insects at a continental scale, and ii) tested whether its dietary niche is shaped by the extension and type of agricultural fields. We employed a dual-primer DNA metabarcoding approach to characterise arthropod 16S and COI...

Data from: A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks

Christopher Stephen Bird, Ana Veríssimo, Sarah Magozzi, Kátya G. Abrantes, Alex Aguilar, Hassan Al-Reasi, Adam Barnett, Dana M. Bethea, Gérard Biais, Asuncion Borrell, Marc Bouchoucha, Mariah Boyle, Edward J. Brooks, Juerg Brunnschweiler, Paco Bustamante, Aaron Carlisle, Diana Catarino, Stéphane Caut, Yves Cherel, Tiphaine Chouvelon, Diana Churchill, Javier Ciancio, Julien Claes, Ana Colaço, Dean L. Courtney … & Clive N. Trueman
Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fixation of carbon atoms that were ultimately assimilated into muscle tissues of 5,394 sharks from 114 species, we identify globally consistent biogeographic traits...

Data from: Correlated evolution between colouration and ambush site in predators with visual prey lures

Felipe Malheiros Gawryszewski, Miguel A. Calero-Torralbo, Rosemary G. Gillespie, Miguel Rodriguez-Girones & Marie E. Herberstein
The evolution of a visual signal will be affected by signaller and receiver behaviour, and by the physical properties of the environment where the signal is displayed. Crab spiders are typical sit-and-wait predators found in diverse ambush sites, such as tree bark, foliage and flowers. Some of the flower-dweller species present a UV+-white visual lure that makes them conspicuous and attractive to their prey. We hypothesised that UV+-white colouration was associated with the evolution of...

Data from: Prioritizing sites for ecological restoration based on ecosystem services

Francisco A. Comín, Beatriz Miranda, Ricardo Sorando, María R. Felipe-Lucia, Juan J. Jiménez & Enrique Navarro
1. Restoration ecology is moving towards designing restoration actions to maximize ecosystem services (ES). Such restoration actions require planning at large spatial scales, as these are often more meaningful for ecosystem functioning and ES supply. As economic resources to undertake ecological restoration at large scales are scarce, prioritizing sites to enhance multiple ES supply is critical. 2. Our study presents an index, the Relative Aggregated Value of ES (RAVES), to prioritize sites for ecological restoration...

Data from: Intraspecific genetic structure, divergence and high rates of clonality in an amphi-Atlantic starfish

Alex Garcia-Cisneros, Crue Palacín, Carlos Renato R. Ventura, Barbara Feital, Paulo C. Paiva & Rocio Perez Portela
Intraspecific genetic diversity and divergence have a large influence on the adaption and evolutionary potential of species. The widely distributed starfish, Coscinasterias tenuispina, combines sexual reproduction with asexual reproduction via fission. Here we analyse the phylogeography of this starfish to reveal historical and contemporary processes driving its intraspecific genetic divergence. We further consider whether asexual reproduction is the most important method of propagation throughout the distribution range of this species. Our study included 326 individuals...

Data from: Poor plant performance under simulated climate change is linked to mycorrhizal responses in a semiarid shrubland

Lupe León-Sánchez, Emilio Nicolás, Marta Goberna, Iván Prieto, Fernando T. Maestre & José Ignacio Querejeta
1.Warmer and drier conditions associated with ongoing climate change will increase abiotic stress for plants and mycorrhizal fungi in drylands worldwide, thereby potentially reducing vegetation cover and productivity and increasing the risk of land degradation and desertification. Rhizosphere microbial interactions and feedbacks are critical processes that could either mitigate or aggravate the vulnerability of dryland vegetation to forecasted climate change. 2.We conducted a four-year manipulative study in a semiarid shrubland in the Iberian Peninsula to...

Data from: Resolving recent plant radiations: power and robustness of genotyping-by-sequencing

Mario Fernández-Mazuecos, Greg Mellers, Beatriz Vigalondo, Llorenç Sáez, Pablo Vargas & Beverley J. Glover
Disentangling species boundaries and phylogenetic relationships within recent evolutionary radiations is a challenge due to the poor morphological differentiation and low genetic divergence between species, frequently accompanied by phenotypic convergence, inter-specific gene flow and incomplete lineage sorting. Here we employed a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach, in combination with morphometric analyses, to investigate a small western Mediterranean clade in the flowering plant genus Linaria that radiated in the Quaternary. After confirming the morphological and genetic distinctness of...

Data from: Persisting in defaunated landscapes: reduced plant population connectivity after seed dispersal collapse

Néstor Pérez-Méndez, Pedro Jordano & Alfredo Valido
1. Defaunation of large-bodied frugivores could be causing severe losses of crucial ecosystem functions such as seed dispersal. The immediate ecological consequences may include alteration or even collapse of seed-mediated gene flow affecting plant population connectivity, with impacts on the regional scale distribution of genetic variation. Yet these far-reaching consequences of defaunation remain understudied. 2. Here we tested whether human-induced defaunation of the Canarian frugivorous lizards (Gallotia, Lacertidae) altered within-island population connectivity and the amount...

Data from: A new promising phylogenetic marker to study the diversity of fungal communities: the Glycoside Hydrolase 63 gene

Leticia Pérez-Izquierdo, Emmanuelle Morin, Jean Paul Maurice, Francis Martin, Ana Rincón & Marc Buée
In molecular ecology, the development of efficient molecular markers for fungi remains an important research domain. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was proposed as universal DNA barcode marker for fungi, but this marker was criticized for Indel-induced alignment problems and its potential lack of phylogenetic resolution. Our main aim was to develop a new phylogenetic gene and a putative functional marker, from single-copy gene, to describe fungal diversity. Thus, we developed a series...

Data from: Null alleles are ubiquitous at microsatellite loci in the Wedge Clam (Donax trunculus)

Ciro Rico, Jose Antonio Cuesta, Pilar Drake, Enrique Macpherson, Louis Bernatchez & Amandine D. Marie
Recent studies have reported an unusually high frequency of nonamplifying alleles at microsatellite loci in bivalves. Null alleles have been associated with heterozygous deficits in many studies. While several studies have tested for its presence using different analytical tools, few have empirically tested for its consequences in estimating population structure and differentiation. We characterised 16 newly developed microsatellite loci and show that null alleles are ubiquitous in the wedge clam, Donax trunculus. We carried out...

Data from: Neandertal and Denisovan DNA from Pleistocene sediments

Viviane Slon, Charlotte Hopfe, Clemens L. Weiss, Fabrizio Mafessoni, Marco De La Rasilla & Carles Lalueza-Fox
Although a rich record of Pleistocene human-associated archaeological assemblages exists, the scarcity of hominin fossils often impedes the understanding of which hominins occupied a site. Using targeted enrichment of mitochondrial DNA we show that cave sediments represent a rich source of ancient mammalian DNA that often includes traces of hominin DNA, even at sites and in layers where no hominin remains have been discovered. By automation-assisted screening of numerous sediment samples we detect Neandertal DNA...

Data from: Very high MHC Class IIB diversity without spatial differentiation in the Mediterranean population of Greater Flamingos

Mark A. F. Gillingham, Arnaud Béchet, Alexandre Courtiol, Manuel Rendón-Martos, Juan A. Amat, Boudjéma Samraoui, Ortaç Onmuş, Simone Sommer & Frank Cézilly
Background: Selective pressure from pathogens is thought to shape the allelic diversity of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in vertebrates. In particular, both local adaptation to pathogens and gene flow are thought to explain a large part of the intraspecific variation observed in MHC allelic diversity. To date, however, evidence that adaptation to locally prevalent pathogens maintains MHC variation is limited to species with limited dispersal and, hence, reduced gene flow. On the one hand...

Data from: A novel locus on chromosome 1 underlies the evolution of a melanic plumage polymorphism in a wild songbird

Yann X.C. Bourgeois, Boris Delahaie, Mathieu Gautier, Emeline Lhuillier, Pierre-Jean G. Malé, Joris A.M. Bertrand, Josselin Cornuault, Kazumasa Wakamatsu, Olivier Bouchez, Claire Mould, Jade Bruxaux, Hélène Holota, Borja Mila, Christophe Thébaud, Joris A. M. Bertrand & Yann X. C. Bourgeois
Understanding the mechanisms responsible for phenotypic diversification within and among species ultimately rests with linking naturally occurring mutations to functionally and ecologically significant traits. Colour polymorphisms are of great interest in this context because discrete colour patterns within a population are often controlled by just a few genes in a common environment. We investigated how and why phenotypic diversity arose and persists in the Zosterops borbonicus white-eye of Reunion (Mascarene archipelago), a colour polymorphic songbird...

Data from: Multiple interaction networks: towards more realistic descriptions of the web of life

David García-Callejas, Roberto Molowny-Horas & Miguel Araújo
Ecological communities are defined by species interacting dynamically in a given location at a given time, and can be conveniently represented as networks of interactions. Pairwise interactions can be ascribed to one of five main types, depending on their outcome for the species involved: amensalism, antagonism (including predation, parasitism and disease), commensalism, competition or mutualism. While most studies have dealt so far with networks involving one single type of interaction at a time, often focusing...

Data from: A prioritised list of invasive alien species to assist the effective implementation of EU legislation

Carles Carboneras, Piero Genovesi, Montserrat Vila, Tim Blackburn, Martina Carrete, Miguel Clavero, Bram D'hondt, Jorge F. Orueta, Belinda Gallardo, Pedro Geraldes, Pablo González-Moreno, Richard D. Gregory, Wolfgang Nentwig, Jean-Yves Paquet, Petr Pysek, Wolfgang Rabitsch, Iván Ramírez, Riccardo Scalera, Jose Tella, Paul Walton, Robin Wynde & Tim M. Blackburn
1. Effective prevention and control of invasive species generally relies on a comprehensive, coherent and representative list of species that enables resources to be used optimally. European Union (EU) Regulation 1143/2014 on invasive alien species (IAS) aims to control or eradicate priority species, and to manage pathways to prevent the introduction and establishment of new IAS; it applies to species considered of Union concern and subject to formal risk assessment. So far, 49 species have...

Data from: Marine biodiversity at the end of the world: Cape Horn and Diego Ramírez islands

Alan M. Friedlander, Enric Ballesteros, Tom W. Bell, Jonatha Giddens, Brad Henning, Mathias Hüne, Alex Muñoz, Pelayo Salinas-De-León & Enric Sala
The vast and complex coast of the Magellan Region of extreme southern Chile possesses a diversity of habitats including fjords, deep channels, and extensive kelp forests, with a unique mix of temperate and sub-Antarctic species. The Cape Horn and Diego Ramírez archipelagos are the most southerly locations in the Americas, with the southernmost kelp forests, and some of the least explored places on earth. The giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera plays a key role in structuring...

Data from: Evolvability meets biogeography: evolutionary potential decreases at high and low environmental favourability

Jesús Martinez-Padilla, Alba Estrada, Regan Early & Francisco García-González
Understanding and forecasting the effects of environmental change on wild populations requires knowledge on a critical question: do populations have the ability to evolve in response to that change? However, our knowledge on how evolution works in wild conditions under different environmental circumstances is extremely limited. We investigated how environmental variation influences the evolutionary potential of phenotypic traits. We used published data to collect or calculate 135 estimates of evolvability of morphological traits of European...

Data from: Biological invasion modifies the co-occurrence patterns of insects along a stress gradient

José Antonio Carbonell, Josefa Velasco, Andres Millan, Andy J. Green, Cristina Coccia, Simone Guareschi & Cayetano Gutiérrez-Cánovas
Biological invasions have become one of the most important drivers of biodiversity loss and ecosystem change world-wide. However, it is still unclear how invasions may interact with local abiotic stressors, which are expected to increase as global change intensifies. Furthermore, we know little about the response to biological invasions of insects, despite their disproportionate contribution to global animal biodiversity. The aim of the present work is to investigate the impact of an invasive aquatic insect...

Data from: A father effect explains sex-ratio bias

Aurelio F. Malo, Felipe Martinez-Pastor, Francisco Garcia-Gonzalez, Julian Garde, Jonathan D. Ballou & Robert C. Lacy
Sex ratio allocation has important fitness consequences, and theory predicts that parents should adjust offspring sex ratio in cases where the fitness returns of producing male and female offspring vary. The ability of fathers to bias offspring sex ratios has traditionally been dismissed given the expectation of an equal proportion of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm (CBS) in ejaculates due to segregation of sex chromosomes at meiosis. This expectation has been recently refuted. Here we used...

Data from: The shift from plant–plant facilitation to competition under severe water deficit is spatially explicit

Michael J. O'Brien, Francisco I. Pugnaire, Cristina Armas, Susana Rodríguez-Echeverría & Christian Schöb
The stress-gradient hypothesis predicts a higher frequency of facilitative interactions as resource limitation increases. Under severe resource limitation, it has been suggested that facilitation may revert to competition, and identifying the presence as well as determining the magnitude of this shift is important for predicting the effect of climate change on biodiversity and plant community dynamics. In this study, we perform a meta-analysis to compare temporal differences of species diversity and productivity under a nurse...

Data from: Contrasts in the marine ecosystem of two Macaronesian islands: a comparison between the remote Selvagens Reserve and Madeira Island

Alan M. Friedlander, Enric Ballesteros, Sabrina Clemente, Emanuel J. Gonçalves, Andrew Estep, Paul Rose & Enric Sala
The islands of Madeira and Selvagens are less than 300 km apart but offer a clear contrast between a densely populated and highly developed island (Madeira), and a largely uninhabited and remote archipelago (Selvagens) within Macaronesia in the eastern Atlantic. The Madeira Archipelago has ~260,000 inhabitants and receives over six million visitor days annually. The Selvagens Islands Reserve is one of the oldest nature reserves in Portugal and comprises two islands and several islets, including...

Data from: Trait-based selection of nurse plants to restore ecosystem functions in mine tailings

Jose A. Navarro Cano, Miguel Verdú & Marta Goberna
1.Metal mining in drylands generates waste tailings with high toxicity, physical instability, as well as water and thermal stresses, that hamper their biological colonisation. This limits the restoration of ecosystem functions that are essential to re-integrate these artificial micro-deserts within the landscape matrix. 2.We assessed the functional role of local nurse plant species and their traits to restore ecosystem functions related to soil fertility, soil microbial productivity and the reduction of abiotic stress. We sampled...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    32

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    32

Affiliations

  • Spanish National Research Council
    32
  • University of Barcelona
    6
  • Centre for Research on Ecology and Forestry Applications
    3
  • University of Oviedo
    2
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    2
  • Ghent University
    2
  • Nature Conservation Foundation
    2
  • University of Hawaii at Manoa
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • University of Bern
    2