25 Works

Data from: Genome-wide signals of drift and local adaptation during rapid lineage divergence in a songbird

Guillermo Friis, Guillermo Fandos, Amanda J. Zellmer, John E. McCormack, Brant C. Faircloth & Borja Milá
The formation of independent evolutionary lineages involves neutral and selective factors, and understanding their relative roles in population divergence is a fundamental goal of speciation research. Correlations between allele frequencies and environmental variability can reveal the role of selection, yet the relative contribution of drift can be difficult to establish. Recently diversified taxa like the Oregon junco (Aves, Passerellidae, Junco hyemalis oreganus) of western North America provide ideal scenarios to apply genetic-environment association analyses (GEA)...

Data from: Trade-offs and synergies between bird conservation and wildfire suppression in the face of global change

Adrian Regos, Virgilio Hermoso, Manuela D'Amen, Antoine Guisan & Lluís Brotons
1. The combined effects of climate change and other factors, such as land use change or fire disturbance, pose daunting challenges for biodiversity conservation worldwide. 2. In this study, we predicted the future effectiveness of the Natura 2000 (N2000), the current network of protected areas (PA) in Europe, at maintaining and representing suitable environmental conditions for a set of 79 bird species between 2000 and 2050 in a fire-prone area strongly affected by land abandonment...

Data from: GlobTherm, a global database on thermal tolerances for aquatic and terrestrial organisms

Joanne M. Bennett, Piero Calosi, Susana Clusella-Trullas, Brezo Martínez, Jennifer Sunday, Adam C. Algar, Miguel B. Araújo, Bradford A. Hawkins, Sally Keith, Ingolf Kühn, Carsten Rahbek, Laura Rodríguez, Alexander Singer, Fabricio Villalobos, Miguel Ángel Olalla-Tárraga & Ignacio Morales-Castilla
How climate affects species distributions is a longstanding question receiving renewed interest owing to the need to predict the impacts of global warming on biodiversity. Is climate change forcing species to live near their critical thermal limits? Are these limits likely to change through natural selection? These and other important questions can be addressed with models relating geographical distributions of species with climate data, but inferences made with these models are highly contingent on non-climatic...

Data from: Spatio-temporal variation in fitness responses to contrasting environments in Arabidopsis thaliana

Moises Exposito-Alonso, Adrian C. Brennan, Carlos Alonso-Blanco & F. Xavier Pico
The evolutionary response of organisms to global climate change is expected to be strongly conditioned by pre-existing standing genetic variation. In addition, natural selection imposed by global climate change on fitness-related traits can be heterogeneous over time. We estimated selection of life-history traits of an entire genetic lineage of the plant A. thaliana occurring in north-western Iberian Peninsula that were transplanted over multiple years into two environmentally contrasting field sites in southern Spain, as southern...

Data from: Transgenerational effects of maternal sexual interactions in seed beetles

Susanne R.K. Zajitschek, Damian K. Dowling, Megan L. Head, Eduardo Rodriguez-Exposito & Francisco Garcia-Gonzalez
Mating bears large costs to females, especially in species with high levels of sexual conflict over mating rates. Given the direct costs to females associated with multiple mating, which include reductions in lifespan and lifetime reproductive success, past research focused on identifying potential indirect benefits (through increases in offspring fitness) that females may accrue. Far less attention has been given to understanding how costs of sexual interactions to females may span across generations. Hence, little...

Data from: The balance of canopy and soil effects determines intraspecific differences in foundation species’ effects on associated plants

Nuria Pistón, Richard Michalet, Christian Schöb, Petr Macek, Cris Armas & Francisco I. Pugnaire
1. The impact of plant-plant interactions on species diversity patterns has been broadly addressed in stressful environments, such as alpine ecosystems, where foundation species promote species richness by creating habitat for other species. However, foundation species with contrasting phenotypes might modify the microhabitat differently, which would alter the subordinate community composition, and coincide with distinct feedback effects of those subordinate species on the foundation species. However, the precise interaction mechanisms that facilitate species are not...

Data from: Quantifying temporal change in plant population attributes: insights from a resurrection approach

Rocío Gómez, Belen Mendez-Vigo, Arnald Marcer, Carlos Alonso-Blanco & F. Xavier Picó
Rapid evolution in annual plants can be quantified by comparing phenotypic and genetic changes between past and contemporary individuals from the same populations over several generations. Such knowledge will help understand the response of plants to rapid environmental shifts, such as the ones imposed by global climate change. To that end, we undertook a resurrection approach in Spanish populations of the annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana that were sampled twice over a decade. Annual weather records...

Data from: Quantitative analysis of connectivity in populations of a semi-aquatic mammal using kinship categories and network assortativity

Lídia Escoda, Angel Fernández-González & Jose Castresana
Analyzing the impact of anthropogenic and natural river barriers on the dispersal of aquatic and semi-aquatic species may be critical for their conservation, but no adequate genetic methods have been developed for quantifying the effect of specific barriers on current connectivity. Knowledge of kinship relationships between individuals and reconstructions of pedigrees obtained using genomic data can be extremely useful, not only for studying the social organization of animals, but also inferring how the last few...

Data from: Genome-wide associations identify novel candidate loci associated with genetic susceptibility to tuberculosis in wild boar

João Queirós, Paulo Célio Alves, Joaquín Vicente, Christian Gortázar & José De La Fuente
Tuberculosis (TB) affects a wide range of host species worldwide. Understanding host-pathogen co-evolution remains a global challenge owing to complex interactions among host genetic factors, pathogen traits and environmental conditions. We used an endemic wild boar population that had undergone a huge increase in Mycobacterium bovis infection prevalence, from 45% in 2002/06 to 83% in 2009/12, to understand the effects of host genetics on host TB outcomes and disease dynamics. Host genomic variation was characterized...

Data from: Fitter frogs from polluted ponds: the complex impacts of human-altered environments

Steven P. Brady, Francisco J. Zamora-Camacho, Fredrik A.A. Eriksson, Debora Goedert, Mar Comas & Ryan Calsbeek
Human-modified habitats rarely yield outcomes that are aligned with conservation ideals. Landscapes that are subdivided by roads are no exception, precipitating negative impacts on populations due to fragmentation, pollution, and road kill. Although many populations in human modified habitats show evidence for local adaptation, rarely does environmental change yield outright benefits for populations of conservation interest. Contrary to expectations, we report surprising benefits experienced by amphibian populations breeding and dwelling in proximity to roads. We...

Data from: Females mate with males with diminished pheomelanin-based coloration in the Eurasian nuthatch Sitta europaea

Ismael Galván & Sol Rodríguez-Martínez
Sexual selection can drive the evolution of phenotypic traits because of female preferences for exaggerated trait expression in males. Sexual selection can also lead to the evolutionary loss of traits, a process to which female preferences for diminished male trait expression are hypothesized to contribute. However, empirical evidence of female preferences for diminished male traits is virtually lacking. Eurasian nuthatches Sitta europaea provide an opportunity to test this possibility, as a chestnut flank patch produced...

Data from: Are females in good condition better able to cope with costly males?

Maider Iglesias-Carrasco, Michael D. Jennions, Susanne R.K. Zajitschek & Megan L. Head
The costs of mating for a female might depend on both her phenotype and that of her mate. Sexually antagonistic male traits that negatively affect females are often condition-dependent, so a male’s rearing environment can affect the costs he imposes on his mate. Likewise, a female’s ability to resist male-imposed costs might be condition-dependent. We experimentally manipulated female and male body condition in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus by rearing larvae on a good or...

Data from: The evolution of iris colour in relation to nocturnality in owls

Arianna Passarotto, Deseada Parejo, Angel Cruz‐Miralles & J. M. Aviles
Birds, due to their multiple colourful displays, constitute a classic paradigm for the study of colour evolution. Although avian eyes are remarkably coloured, the functional basis behind inter‐specific variability in iris colouration remains poorly understood. Owls are an ideal system to shed light on the role of ecology in promoting iris colour evolution as they show inter‐specific variation in iris colour and in niche specialization with some species being strictly nocturnal and others active during...

Data from: Shorebirds as important vectors for plant dispersal in Europe

Ádám Lovas-Kiss, Marta I. Sanchez, David M. Wilkinson, Neil E. Coughlan, Jose A. Alves & Andy J. Green
Shorebirds (Charadriiformes) undergo rapid migrations with potential for long-distance dispersal (LDD) of plants. We studied the frequency of endozoochory by shorebirds in different parts of Europe covering a broad latitudinal range and different seasons. We assessed whether plants dispersed conformed to morphological dispersal syndromes. A total of 409 excreta samples (271 faeces and 138 pellets) were collected from redshank (Tringa totanus), black-winged stilt (Himantopus himantopus), pied avocet (Recurvirostra avosetta), northern lapwing (Vanellus vanellus), Eurasian curlew...

Data from: Plant life history stage and nurse age change the development of ecological networks in an arid ecosystem

Gianalberto Losapio, Francisco I. Pugnaire, Michael J. O'Brien & Christian Schöb
Understanding how ecological networks are organised over the course of an organism’s lifetime is crucial for predicting the dynamics of interacting populations and communities across temporal scales. However, most studies so far considered only one life history stage at a time, such as adult, when studying networks of interacting species. Therefore, knowledge about how multiple life history stages affect the development and stability of plant–plant association networks is lacking. We measured the understory adult plant...

Data from: Predation risk determines pigmentation phenotype in nuthatches by melanin-related gene expression effects

Ismael Galvan
Pigments determine the appearance of organisms. However, pigment production can be associated to physiological constraints as in the case of pheomelanin, the sulphurated form of melanin whose synthesis in melanocytes consumes cysteine and consequently reduces the availability of glutathione (GSH) to exert antioxidant protection. Pheomelanogenesis may thus increase the susceptibility to suffer chronic oxidative stress. I investigated the possibility that environmental lability in the expression of genes regulating pheomelanogenesis protects from oxidative stress, a situation...

Data from: The timing of frugivore-mediated seed dispersal effectiveness

Juan P. González-Varo, Juan M. Arroyo & Pedro Jordano
The seed dispersal effectiveness framework allows assessing mutualistic services from frugivorous animals in terms of quantity and quality. Quantity accounts for the number of seeds dispersed and quality for the probability of recruitment of dispersed seeds. Research on this topic has largely focused on the spatial patterns of seed deposition because seed fates often vary between microhabitats due to differences in biotic and abiotic factors. However, the temporal dimension has remained completely overlooked despite these...

Data from: Tracking data and retrospective analyses of diet reveal the consequences of loss of marine subsidies for an obligate scavenger, the Andean condor

Sergio A. Lambertucci, Joan Navarro, Jose Antonio Sánchez-Zapata, Keith A. Hobson, Pablo A.E. Alarcón, Guillermo Wiemeyer, Guillermo Blanco, Fernando Hiraldo & Jose Antonio Donazar
Over the last century, marine mammals have been dramatically reduced in the world’s oceans. We examined evidence that this change caused dietary and foraging pattern shifts of the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus) in Patagonia. We hypothesized that, after the decrease in marine mammals and the increase in human use of coastlines, condor diet changed to a more terrestrial diet which, in turn, influenced their foraging patterns. We evaluated the diet by means of stable isotope...

Data from: Context-dependency and anthropogenic effects on individual plant-frugivore networks

Maria Florencia Miguel, Pedro Jordano, Solana Tabeni & Claudia M. Campos
Anthropogenic activities, such as grazing by domestic animals, are considered drivers of environmental changes that may influence the structure of interaction networks. The study of individual-based networks allows testing how species-level interaction patterns emerge from the pooled interaction modes of individuals within populations. Exponential random graph models (ERGMs) examine the global structure of networks by allowing the inclusion of specific node (i.e. interacting partners) properties as explanatory covariates. Here we assessed the structure of individual...

Data from: Bayesian vector transmission model detects conflicting interactions from transgenic disease‐resistant grapevines

Adam R. Zeilinger, Daniel Turek, Daniele Cornara, Anne Sicard, Steven E. Lindow & Rodrigo P. P. Almeida
Effective management of vector-borne plant pathogens often relies on disease-resistant cultivars. While heterogeneity in host resistance and in pathogen population density at the host population level play important and well-recognized roles in epidemiology, the effects of resistance traits on pathogen distribution at the individual host level, and the epidemiological consequences in turn, are poorly understood. Transgenic disease-resistant plants that produce bacterial Diffusible Signaling Factor (DSF) could provide resistance to the vector-borne bacterium Xylella fastidiosa by...

Data from: Heat tolerance is more variable than cold tolerance across species of Iberian lizards after controlling for intraspecific variation

Salvador Herrando-Pérez, Camila Monasterio, Wouter Beukema, Verónica Gomes, Francisco Gomes Ferri-Yáñez, Josabel Belliure, Steven L. Chown, Lauren B Buckley, David R. Vieites & Miguel B. Araújo
The widespread observation that heat tolerance is less variable than cold tolerance (‘cold-tolerance asymmetry’) leads to the prediction that species exposed to temperatures near their thermal maxima should have reduced evolutionary potential for adapting to climate warming. However, the prediction is largely supported by species-level global studies based on single estimates of both physiological metrics per taxon. We ask if cold-tolerance asymmetry holds for Iberian lizards after accounting for intraspecific variation in critical thermal maxima...

Data from: Impacts of urbanization on insect herbivory and plant defences in oak trees

Xoaquín Moreira, Luis Abdala-Roberts, Jorge Berny Mier C. Y Terán, Felisa Covelo, Raúl De La Mata, Marta Francisco, Bess Hardwick, Ricardo M. Pires, Tomas Roslin, Dmitry S. Schigel, Jan P.J.G. Ten Hoopen, Bart G.H. Timmermans, Laura J.A. Van Dijk, Bastien Castagneyrol, Ayco J.M. Tack, Jorge C. Berny Mier Y Teran, Laura J. A. Van Dijk & Ayco J. M. Tack
Systematic comparisons of species interactions in urban vs. rural environments can improve our understanding of shifts in ecological processes due to urbanization. However, such studies are relatively uncommon and the mechanisms driving urbanization effects on species interactions (e.g., between plants and insect herbivores) remain elusive. Here we investigated the effects of urbanization on leaf herbivory by insect chewers and miners associated with the English oak (Quercus robur) by sampling trees in rural and urban areas...

Data from: Herbivore control in connected seascapes: habitat determines when population regulation occurs in the life history of a key herbivore

Jordi Boada, Simone Farina, Rohan Arthur, Javier Romero, Patricia Prado & Teresa Alcoverro
Herbivore outbreaks often trigger catastrophic overgrazing events in marine macrophyte ecosystems. The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, the dominant herbivore of shallow Mediterranean seascapes, is capable of precipitating shifts to barrens when its populations explode. P. lividus is found ubiquitously in rocky macroalgal communities and in sandy seagrass meadows of Posidonia oceanica, two of the most important subtidal habitats in the Mediterranean. We explored if habitat-specific regulation across the principal stages of the urchin life cycle...

Data from: Testing the role of the Red Queen and Court Jester as drivers of the macroevolution of Apollo butterflies

Fabien L. Condamine, Jonathan Rolland, Sebastian Höhna, Felix A. H. Sperling & Isabel Sanmartín
In macroevolution, the Red Queen (RQ) model posits that biodiversity dynamics depend mainly on species-intrinsic biotic factors such as interactions among species or life-history traits, while the Court Jester (CJ) model states that extrinsic environmental abiotic factors have a stronger role. Until recently, a lack of relevant methodological approaches has prevented the unraveling of contributions from these two types of factors to the evolutionary history of a lineage. Here we take advantage of the rapid...

Data from: Mycorrhizal symbiosis increases the benefits of plant facilitative interactions

Alicia Montesinos Navarro, Alfonso Valiente-Banuet & Miguel Verdu
The diversity of pathways through which mycorrhizal fungi alter plant coexistence hinders the understanding of their effects on plant-plant interactions. The outcome of plant facilitative interactions can be indirectly affected by mycorrhizal symbiosis, ultimately shaping biodiversity patterns. We tested whether mycorrhizal symbiosis enhances plant facilitative interactions and whether its effect is consistent across different methodological approaches and biological scenarios. We conducted a meta-analysis of 215 cases (involving 21 nurse and 29 facilitated species), in which...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    25

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    25

Affiliations

  • Spanish National Research Council
    25
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    2
  • Institute for Research and Technology in Food and Agriculture
    2
  • University of Lausanne
    2
  • Australian National University
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales
    2
  • Centre for Research on Ecology and Forestry Applications
    2
  • University of Porto
    2
  • CIUDAD
    1