7 Works

Data from: Population genetic structure of the western cherry fruit fly Rhagoletis indifferens (Diptera: Tephritidae) in British Columbia, Canada

Sheri A. Maxwell, Howard M. A. Thistlewood & Nusha Keyghobadi
1. Population connectivity and movement are key ecological parameters influencing the impact of pests, and are important considerations in control strategies. For many insects, these parameters are difficult to assess directly, although they may be assessed indirectly using population genetic data. 2. We used microsatellite markers to examine population genetic structure of the western cherry fruit fly, the main pest of cherry crops in western North America, in British Columbia, Canada, and make inferences about...

Data from: Genes underlying altruism

Graham J. Thompson, Peter L. Hurd & Bernard J. Crespi
William D. Hamilton postulated the existence of 'genes underlying altruism', under the rubric of inclusive fitness theory, a half-century ago. Such genes are now poised for discovery. In this article we develop a set of intuitive criteria for the recognition and analysis of genes for altruism, and describe the first candidates for altruism genes from social insects and humans. We also provide evidence from a human population for genetically-based tradeoffs, underlain by oxytocin-system polymorphisms, between...

Data from: Resource partitioning by insectivorous bats in Jamaica

Matthew A. Emrich, Elizabeth L. Clare, William O. C. Symondson, Susan E. Koenig & Melville Brock Fenton
In this investigation, we use variation in wing morphology, echolocation behaviour, patterns of habitat use and molecular diet analysis to demonstrate that six species of sympatric insectivorous bats in Jamaica show significant differences that could explain resource partitioning among the species. High-intensity echolocating species that used shorter, broadband signals and had shorter, broader wings (Pteronotus macleayii, Pteronotus quadridens, Mormoops blainvillii) foraged most in edge habitats, but differed in timing of peak activity. P. macleayii and...

Data from: The diet of Myotis lucifugus across Canada: assessing foraging quality and diet variability

Elizabeth L. Clare, William O. C. Symondson, Hugh Broders, François Fabianek, Erin E. Frazer, Alistair MacKenzie, Andrew Boughen, Rachel Hamilton, Craig K. R. Willis, Felix Martinez-Nuñez, Allyson K. Menzies, Kaleigh J. O. Norquay, Mark Brigham, Joseph Poissant, Jody Rintoul, Robert M. R. Barclay, Jesika P. Reimer & Erin E. Fraser
Variation in prey resources influences the diet and behaviour of predators. When prey become limiting, predators may travel farther to find preferred food or adjust to existing local resources. When predators are habitat limited, local resource abundance impacts foraging success. We analysed the diet of Myotis lucifugus (little brown bats) from Nova Scotia (eastern Canada) to the Northwest Territories (north-western Canada). This distribution includes extremes of season length and temperature and encompasses colonies on rural...

Data from: Genetic architecture of survival and fitness-related traits in two populations of Atlantic salmon

Aimee Lee S. Houde, Chris C. Wilson & Bryan D. Neff
The additive genetic effects of traits can be used to predict evolutionary trajectories, such as responses to selection. Non-additive genetic and maternal environmental effects can also change evolutionary trajectories and influence phenotypes, but these later effects have received less attention by researchers. We partitioned the phenotypic variance of survival and fitness-related traits into additive genetic, non- additive genetic, and maternal environmental effects using a full-factorial breeding design within two allopatric populations of Atlantic salmon (Salmo...

Data from: An inordinate fondness for beetles? Variation in seasonal dietary preferences of night roosting big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus)

Elizabeth L. Clare, William O. C. Symondson & Melville Brockett Fenton
Generalist species with numerous food web interactions are thought to provide stability to ecosystem dynamics; however, it is not always clear whether habitat generality translates into dietary diversity. Big brown bats are common across North America and employ a flexible foraging strategy over water, dense forests, forest edges and rural and urban settings. Despite this generalist use of habitat, they are paradoxically characterized as beetle specialists. However, hard carapaces may preferentially survive digestion leading to...

Data from: Trophic niche flexibility in Glossophaga soricina: how a nectar seeker sneaks an insect snack

Elizabeth L. Clare, Holger R. Goerlitz, Violaine A. Drapeau, Marc W. Holderied, Amanda M. Adams, Juliet Nagel, Elizabeth R. Dumont, Paul D. N. Hebert & M. Brock Fenton
Omnivory enables animals to fill more than one trophic niche, providing access to a wider variety of food resources with potentially higher nutrient value, particularly when resources become scarce. Animals can achieve omnivory using different strategies, for example opportunistic foraging, or switching between multiple trophic niches. The Neotropical bat Glossophaga soricina (Pallas, 1766) is a common and widespread species known for nectar-feeding, but it also eats fruit and insects. Approaching stationary objects (flowers and fruits)...

Registration Year

  • 2013
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Western University
    7
  • Queen Mary University of London
    3
  • Cardiff University
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • Saint Mary's University
    1
  • University of Alberta
    1
  • University of Guelph
    1
  • Simon Fraser University
    1
  • University of Winnipeg
    1