6 Works

Data from: Variable effects of temperature on insect herbivory

Nathan P. Lemoine, Deron E. Burkepile & John D. Parker
Rising temperatures can influence the top-down control of plant biomass by increasing herbivore metabolic demands. Unfortunately, we know relatively little about the effects of temperature on herbivory rates for most insect herbivores in a given community. Evolutionary history, adaptation to local environments, and dietary factors may lead to variable thermal response curves across different species. Here we characterized the effect of temperature on herbivory rates for 21 herbivore-plant pairs, encompassing 14 herbivore and 12 plant...

Data from: To keep on track during flight, fruitflies discount the skyward view

Chantell Mazo & Jamie C. Theobald
When small flying insects go off their intended course, they use the resulting pattern of motion on their eye, or optic flow, to guide corrective steering. A change in heading generates a unique, rotational motion pattern and a change in position generates a translational motion pattern, and each produces corrective responses in the wingbeats. Any image in the flow field can signal rotation, but owing to parallax, only the images of nearby objects can signal...

Data from: Mechanistic insights into landscape genetic structure of two tropical amphibians using field-derived resistance surfaces

A. Justin Nowakowski, J. Andrew DeWoody, Matthew E. Fagan, Janna R. Willoughby & Maureen A. Donnelly
Conversion of forests to agriculture often fragments distributions of forest species and can disrupt gene flow. We examined effects of prevalent land uses on genetic connectivity of two amphibian species in northeastern Costa Rica. We incorporated data from field surveys and experiments to develop resistance surfaces that represent local mechanisms hypothesized to modify dispersal success of amphibians, such as habitat-specific predation and desiccation risk. Because time lags can exist between forest conversion and genetic responses,...

Data from: Conserved genetic regions across angiosperms as tools to develop single copy nuclear markers in gymnosperms: an example using cycads

Dayana E. Salas-Leiva, Alan W. Meerow, Javier Francisco-Ortega, Michael Calonje, M. Patrick Griffith, Dennis W. Stevenson & Kyoko Nakamura
Several individuals of the Caribbean Zamia clade and other cycad genera were used to identify single copy nuclear genes for phylogeographic and phylogenetic studies in Cycadales. Two strategies were employed to select target loci: 1) a tblastX search of Arabidopsis conserved ortholog sequence (COS) set and, 2) a tblastX search of Arabidopsis-Populus-Vitis-Oryza Shared Single Copy genes (APVO SSC) against the EST Zamia databases in Genbank. From the first strategy, 30 loci were selected, and from...

Data from: A phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia: an RNA-seq approach

Vanessa L. González, Sónia C. S. Andrade, Rüdiger Bieler, Timothy M. Collins, Casey W. Dunn, Paula M. Mikkelsen, John D. Taylor, Gonzalo Giribet & V. L. Gonzalez
Bivalves are an ancient and ubiquitous group of aquatic invertebrates with an estimated 10 000–20 000 living species. They are economically significant as a human food source, and ecologically important given their biomass and effects on communities. Their phylogenetic relationships have been studied for decades, and their unparalleled fossil record extends from the Cambrian to the Recent. Nevertheless, a robustly supported phylogeny of the deepest nodes, needed to fully exploit the bivalves as a model...

Data from: The emergence of the lobsters: phylogenetic relationships, morphological evolution and divergence time comparisons of an ancient group (Decapoda: Achelata, Astacidea, Glypheidea, Polychelida)

Heather D. Bracken-Grissom, Shane T. Ahyong, Richard D. Wilkinson, Rodney M. Felmann, Carrie E. Schweitzer, Jesse W. Breinholt, Matthew Bendall, Ferran Palero, Tin-Yam Chan, Darryl L. Felder, Rafael Robles, Ka-Hou Chu, Ling-Ming Tsang, Dohyup Kim, Joel W. Martin, Keith A. Crandall & Rodney M. Feldmann
Lobsters are a ubiquitous and economically important group of decapod crustaceans that includes the infraorders Polychelida, Glypheidea, Astacidea and Achelata. They include familiar forms such as the spiny, slipper, clawed lobsters and crayfish and unfamiliar forms such as the deep-sea and “living fossil” species. The high degree of morphological diversity among these infraorders has led to a dynamic classification and conflicting hypotheses of evolutionary relationships. In this study, we estimated phylogenetic relationships amongst the major...

Registration Year

  • 2014
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Florida International University
    6
  • Kent State University at Stark
    1
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1
  • Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    1
  • Chinese University of Hong Kong
    1
  • George Washington University
    1
  • Goddard Space Flight Center
    1
  • University of Nottingham
    1
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    1
  • Smithsonian Institution
    1