3 Works

Data for: Sexual conflict drives micro- and macroevolution of sexual dimorphism in immunity

David Berger, Basabi Bagchi, Quentin Corbel, Imroze Khan, Ellen Payne, Devshuvam Banerji, Johanna Liljestrand-Rönn, Ivain Martinossi-Allibert, Julian Baur, Ahmed Sayadi, Elina Immonen, Göran Arnqvist & Irene Söderhäll
Background: Sexual dimorphism in immunity is believed to reflect sex-differences in reproductive strategies and trade-offs between competing life history demands. Sexual selection can have major effects on mating rates and sex-specific costs of mating and may thereby influence sex-differences in immunity as well as associated host-pathogen dynamics. Yet, experimental evidence linking the mating system to evolved sexual dimorphism in immunity are scarce and the direct effects of mating rate on immunity are not well established....

Improved household living standards can restore dry tropical forests

Ruth DeFries, Meghna Agarwala, Sandra Baquie, Pooja Choksi, Sarika Khanwilkar, Pinki Mondal, Harini Nagendra & Johannes Uperlainen.
Despite multiple approaches over the last several decades to harmonize conservation and development goals in the tropics, forest-depende­­­­­­nt households remain the poorest in the world. Durable housing and alternatives to fuelwood for cooking are critical needs to reduce multi-dimensional poverty. These improvements also potentially reduce pressure on forests and alleviate forest degradation. We test this possibility in dry tropical forests of the Central Indian Highlands where tribal and other marginalized populations rely on forests for...

Carcass scavenging relaxes chemical-driven female interference competition in flour beetles

Basabi Bagchi, Srijan Seal, Manasven Raina, Dipendra Nath Basu & Imroze Khan
Female-female nonsexual interference competition is a major fitness determinant of biased sex-ratio groups with high female density. What strategies can females use to overcome the negative impact of this competition? We used flour beetle Tribolium castaneum to answer this question, where competing females from female-biased groups were already known to suppress each other’s fecundity by secreting toxic quinones from their stink glands, indicating a unique chemical-driven interference competition. Surprisingly, increasing resources did not alleviate these...

Registration Year

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  • Ashoka University
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  • National Centre for Biological Sciences
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  • University of Valencia
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  • Uppsala University
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