8 Works

Data from: Inferring subjective states through the observation of actions

Deevia Patel, Steve M. Flemming, James M. Kilner & S. M. Fleming
Estimating another person’s subjective confidence is crucial for social interaction, but how this inference is achieved is unknown. Previous research has demonstrated that the speed at which people make decisions is correlated with their confidence in their decision. Here we show that 1) subjects’ are able to infer the subjective confidence of another person simply through the observation of their actions and 2) this inference is dependent upon the performance of each subject when executing...

Data from: Selective bird predation on the peppered moth: the last experiment of Michael Majerus

Laurence M. Cook, Bruce S. Grant, Ilik J. Saccheri & James Mallet
Colour variation in the peppered moth Biston betularia was long accepted to be under strong natural selection. Melanics were believed to be fitter than pale morphs because of lower predation at daytime resting sites on dark, sooty bark. Melanics became common during the industrial revolution, but since 1970 there has been a rapid reversal, assumed to have been caused by predators selecting against melanics resting on today's less sooty bark. Recently, these classical explanations of...

Data from: Direct evidence for encoding of motion streaks in human visual cortex

Deborah Apthorp, D. Samuel Schwarzkopf, Christian Kaul, Bahador Bahrami, David Alais & Geraint Rees
Temporal integration in the visual system causes fast-moving objects to generate static, oriented traces (‘motion streaks’), which could be used to help judge direction of motion. While human psychophysics and single-unit studies in non-human primates are consistent with this hypothesis, direct neural evidence from the human cortex is still lacking. First, we provide psychophysical evidence that faster and slower motions are processed by distinct neural mechanisms: faster motion raised human perceptual thresholds for static orientations...

Data from: Genetic drift in antagonistic genes leads to divergence in sex-specific fitness between experimental populations of Drosophila melanogaster

Jack Hesketh, Kevin Fowler & Max Reuter
Males and females differ in their reproductive roles and as a consequence are often under diverging selection pressures on shared phenotypic traits. Theory predicts that divergent selection can favor the invasion of sexually antagonistic alleles, which increase the fitness of one sex at the detriment of the other. Sexual antagonism can be subsequently resolved through the evolution of sex-specific gene expression, allowing the sexes to diverge phenotypically. While sexual dimorphism is very common, recent evidence...

Data from: Sampling bias and the fossil record of planktonic foraminifera on land and in the deep sea

Graeme T. Lloyd, Paul N. Pearson, Jeremy R. Young & Andrew B. Smith
Large-scale trends in planktonic foraminiferal diversity have so far been based on utilization of synoptic biostratigraphic range charts. Although this approach ensures the taxonomic consistency and quality of the data being used, it takes no formal account of any sampling biases that might exist in the fossil record. We demonstrate that the occurrence data of planktonic foraminifera, as recorded in the primary literature, are strongly biased by sampling. We do this by demonstrating that raw...

Data from: Genome-wide patterns of divergence and gene flow across a butterfly radiation

Nicola J. Nadeau, Simon H. Martin, Krzysztof M. Kozak, Camilo Salazar, Kanchon K. Dasmahapatra, John W. Davey, Simon W. Baxter, Mark L. Blaxter, James Mallet & Chris D. Jiggins
The Heliconius butterflies are a diverse recent radiation comprising multiple levels of divergence with on-going gene flow between species. The recently sequenced genome of Heliconius melpomene allowed us to investigate the genomic evolution of this group using dense RAD marker sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of 54 individuals robustly supported reciprocal monophyly of H. melpomene and H. cydno and refuted previous phylogenetic hypotheses that H. melpomene may be paraphylectic with respect to H. cydno. H. timareta also...

Data from: Not just passengers: Pigeons, Columba livia, can learn homing routes while flying with a more experienced conspecific

Benjamin Pettit, Andrea Flack, Robin Freemain, Tim Guilford, Dora Biro & R. Freeman
For animals that travel in groups, the directional choices of conspecifics are potentially a rich source of information for spatial learning. In this study, we investigate how the opportunity to follow a locally experienced demonstrator affects route learning by pigeons over repeated homing flights. This test of social influences on navigation takes advantage of the individually distinctive routes that pigeons establish when trained alone. We found that pigeons learn routes just as effectively while flying...

Data from: The evolution of locomotor rhythmicity in tetrapods

Callum F. Ross, Richard W. Blob, David R. Carrier, Monica A. Daley, Stephen M. Deban, Brigitte Demes, Janaya L. Gripper, Jose Iriarte-Diaz, Brandon Michael Kilbourne, Tobias Landberg, John D. Polk, Nadja Schilling & Bieke Vanhooydonck
Differences in rhythmicity (relative variance in cycle period) between mammal, fish, and lizard feeding systems have been hypothesized to be associated with differences in their sensorimotor control systems. We tested this hypothesis by examining whether the locomotion of tachymetabolic tetrapods (birds and mammals) is more rhythmic than that of bradymetabolic tetrapods (lizards, alligators, turtles, salamanders). Species averages of intra-individual coefficients of variation in cycle period were compared while controlling for gait and substrate. Variance in...

Registration Year

  • 2012
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University College London
    8
  • University of Antwerp
    1
  • University of Wollongong
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • New York University
    1
  • University of Edinburgh
    1
  • University of Chicago
    1
  • University of Manchester
    1
  • University of South Florida
    1
  • Clemson University
    1