197 Works

Data from: Parasite resistance predicts fitness better than fecundity in a natural population of the freshwater snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum

Dorota Paczesniak, Kirsten Klappert, Kirstin Kopp, Maurine Neiman, Katri Seppälä, Curtis M. Lively & Jukka Jokela
The cost of males should give asexual females an advantage when in competition with sexual females. In addition, high-fecundity asexual genotypes should have an advantage over low-fecundity clones, leading to reduction in clonal diversity over time. To evaluate fitness components in a natural population, we measured the annual reproductive rate of individual sexual and asexual female Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a New Zealand freshwater snail, in field enclosures that excluded competitors and predators. We used allozyme genotyping...

Artificial light at night amplifies seasonal relapse of haemosporidian parasites in a widespread songbird

Daniel Becker, Devraj Singh, Qiuyun Pan, Jesse Montoure, Katherine Talbott, Sarah Wanamaker & Ellen Ketterson
Urban habitats can shape interactions between hosts and parasites by altering within-host processes such as resistance. Artificial light at night is common in urban environments, and chronic exposure can impair host immunity in ways that may increase infection. However, studies of causal links between this stressor, immunity, and infection dynamics are rare, particularly in migratory animals. Here, we experimentally tested how artificial light at night affects cellular immunity and intensity of infection with haemosporidian parasites...

Data for Body mass-related changes in mammal community assembly patterns during the late Quaternary of North America

Silvia Pineda-Munoz
The late Quaternary of North America was marked by prominent ecological changes, including the end-Pleistocene megafaunal extinction, the spread of human settlements, and the rise of agriculture. Here we examine the mechanistic reasons for temporal changes in mammal species association and body size during this time period. Building upon the co-occurrence results from Lyons et al. (2016) – wherein each species pair was classified as spatially aggregated, segregated, or random – we examined body mass...

Data from: \"Transcriptome sequencing of the Antarctic Colobanthus quitensis (Kunth) Bartl (Caryophillaceae)\" in Genomic Resources Notes Accepted 1 February 2015 – 31 March 2015

Laura Bertini, Silvia Proietti & Carla Caruso
This article documents the public availability of raw transcriptome sequence data and assembled contigs of the Antarctic plant Colobanthus quitensis grown in two different climatic conditions. BLAST hits are also provided.

Data from: A garter snake transcriptome: pyrosequencing, de novo assembly, and sex-specific differences

Tonia S. Schwartz, Hongseok Tae, Youngik Yang, Keithanne Mockaitis, John L. Van Hemert, Stephen R. Proulx, Jeong-Hyeon Choi & Anne M. Bronikowski
Background: The reptiles, characterized by both diversity and unique evolutionary adaptations, provide a comprehensive system for comparative studies of metabolism, physiology, and development. However, molecular resources for ectothermic reptiles are severely limited, hampering our ability to study the genetic basis for many evolutionarily important traits such as metabolic plasticity, extreme longevity, limblessness, venom, and freeze tolerance. Here we use massively parallel sequencing (454 GS-FLX Titanium) to generate a transcriptome of the western terrestrial garter snake...

Data from: The relative importance of rapid evolution for plant-microbe interactions depends on ecological context

Casey P. TerHorst, Jennifer A. Lau & Jay T. Lennon
Evolution can occur on ecological time-scales, affecting community and ecosystem processes. However, the importance of evolutionary change relative to ecological processes remains largely unknown. Here, we analyse data from a long-term experiment in which we allowed plant populations to evolve for three generations in dry or wet soils and used a reciprocal transplant to compare the ecological effect of drought and the effect of plant evolutionary responses to drought on soil microbial communities and nutrient...

Data from: Resources, key traits, and the size of fungal epidemics in Daphnia populations

David J. Civitello, Rachel M. Penczykowski, Aimee N. Smith, Marta S. Shocket, Meghan A. Duffy & Spencer R. Hall
1. Parasites can profoundly affect host populations and ecological communities. Thus, it remains critical to identify mechanisms that drive variation in epidemics. Resource availability can drive epidemics via traits of hosts and parasites that govern disease spread. 2. Here, we map resource–trait–epidemic connections to explain variation in fungal outbreaks (Metschnikowia bicuspidata) in a zooplankton host (Daphnia dentifera) among lakes. We predicted epidemics would grow larger in lakes with more phytoplankton via three energetic mechanisms. First,...

Data from: Powerful methods for detecting introgressed regions from population genomic data

Benjamin K. Rosenzweig, James B. Pease, Nora J. Besansky & Matthew H. Hahn
Understanding the types and functions of genes that are able to cross species boundaries—and those that are not—is an important step in understanding the forces maintaining species as largely independent lineages across the remainder of the genome. With large next-generation sequencing data sets we are now able to ask whether introgression has occurred across the genome, and multiple methods have been proposed to detect the signature of such events. Here, we introduce a new summary...

Data from: Direct and indirect genetic effects in life history traits of flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum)

Esther D. Ellen, Katrijn Peeters, Merel Verhoeven, Rieta Gols, Jeffrey A. Harvey, Michael J. Wade, Marcel Dicke & Piter Bijma
Indirect genetic effects (IGEs) are the basis of social interactions among conspecifics, and can affect genetic variation of non-social as well as social traits. We used flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum) of two phenotypically distinguishable populations to estimate genetic (co)variances and the effect of IGEs on three life-history traits: development time (DT), growth rate (GR), and pupal body mass (BM). We found that GR was strongly affected by social environment with IGEs accounting for 18% of...

Data from: Effects of between-site variation in soil microbial communities and plant-soil feedbacks on the productivity and composition of plant communities

Jonathan T. Bauer, Noah Blumenthal, Anna J. Miller, Julia K. Ferguson & Heather L. Reynolds
A critical challenge in the science and practice of restoration ecology is to understand the drivers of variation in restoration outcomes. Soil microbial communities may have a role in explaining this variation due to both site-to-site variation in the composition of soil microbial communities and due to variation that can arise due to plant-soil feedbacks. We tested the relative importance of between-site variation in soil microbial community composition and plant-soil feedbacks in shaping plant community...

Data from: Does older adults' cognitive function disrupt the malleability of their attitudes toward outgroup members?: an fMRI investigation

Anne C. Krendl & Elizabeth A. Kensinger
In the current study we examine how individual differences in older adults’ global cognitive function impacts the extent to which their attitudes toward stigmatized individuals are malleable. Because prior research has elucidated the neural processes that are involved in evaluating stigmatized individuals who are responsible or not responsible for their condition, a cognitive neuroscience approach may be well-suited to answer this question. In the current study, 36 older and 17 young adults underwent functional magnetic...

Data from: Effect of acute stressor on reproductive behavior differs between urban and rural birds

Mikus Abolins-Abols, Sydney F. Hope & Ellen D. Ketterson
The life-history trade-off between self-maintenance and reproduction posits that investment in one function decreases investment in the other. Manipulating the costs and benefits of functions involved in a trade-off may alter this interaction. Here we ask whether investment in self-maintenance during a stress response alters territorial behavior in wild Dark-eyed Juncos and whether rural and urban birds, which are known to differ in the magnitude of the stress response (greater in rural), also differ in...

Data from: Molecular mechanisms of postmating prezygotic reproductive isolation uncovered by transcriptome analysis

James B. Pease, Rafael F. Guerrero, Natasha Sherman, Matthew Hahn, Leonie C. Moyle, Matthew W. Hahn & Natasha A. Sherman
Little is known about the physiological responses and genetic mutations associated with reproductive isolation between species, especially for postmating prezygotic isolating barriers. Here, we examine changes in gene expression that accompany the expression of ‘unilateral incompatibility’ (UI)—a postmating prezygotic barrier in which fertilization is prevented by gamete rejection in the reproductive tract [in this case of pollen tubes (male gametophytes)] in one direction of a species cross, but is successful in the reciprocal crossing direction....

Data from: Herbivory enhances the diversity of primary producers in pond ecosystems

Mathew A. Leibold, Spencer R. Hall, Val H. Smith & David A. Lytle
Diversity of primary producer is often surprisingly high, despite few limiting factors such as nutrients and light to facilitate species coexistence. In theory, the presence of herbivores could increase the diversity of primary producers, resolving this “paradox of the plankton”. Little experimental evidence supports this natural enemies hypothesis, but previous tests suffer from several deficiencies. Previous experiments often did not allow for multigeneration effects; utilized low diversity assemblages of herbivores; and limited opportunities for new...

Data from: Similarity in temporal variation in sex-biased dispersal over short and long distances in the dark-eyed junco, Junco hyemalis

Eric B. Liebgold, Nicole M. Gerlach & Ellen D. Ketterson
Patterns of sex-biased dispersal are typically consistent within taxa, e.g., female-biased in birds and male-biased in mammals, leading to theories about the evolutionary pressures that lead to sex-biased dispersal. However, generalizations about the evolution of sex biases tend to overlook that dispersal is mediated by ecological factors that vary over time. We examined potential temporal variation in between- and within-population dispersal over an 11-year period in a bird, the dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis). We measured...

Data from: Plastic responses to competition: does bacteriocin production increase in the presence of nonself competitors?

Amrita Bhattacharya, Hannah Tae‐Young Pak, Farrah Bashey & Hannah Tae-Young Pak
Anticompetitor traits such as the production of allelopathic toxins can confer significant competitive benefits but are often costly to produce. Evolution of these traits may be facilitated by environment‐specific induction; however, the extent to which costly anticompetitor traits are induced by competitors is not well explored. Here, we addressed this question using bacteriocins, which are highly specific, proteinaceous anticompetitor toxins, produced by most lineages of bacteria and archaea. We tested the prediction that bacteriocin production...

Data from: Heterochronic developmental shifts underlie floral diversity within Jaltomata (Solanaceae)

Jamie L. Kostyun, Jill C. Preston & Leonie C. Moyle
Background: Heterochronic shifts during mid- to late stages of organismal development have been proposed as key mechanisms generating phenotypic diversity. To determine whether late heterochronic shifts underlie derived floral morphologies within Jaltomata (Solanaceae)—a genus whose species have extensive and recently evolved floral diversity—we compared floral development of four diverse species (including an ambiguously ancestral or secondarily derived rotate, two putatively independently evolved campanulate, and a tubular morph) to the ancestral rotate floral form, as well...

Data from: Parasite rearing and infection temperatures jointly influence disease transmission and shape seasonality of epidemics

Marta S. Shocket, Daniela Vergara, Andrew J. Sickbert, Jason M. Walsman, Alexander T. Strauss, Jessica L. Hite, Meghan A. Duffy, Carla E. Cáceres & Spencer R. Hall
Seasonal epidemics erupt commonly in nature and are driven by numerous mechanisms. Here, we suggest a new mechanism that could determine the size and timing of seasonal epidemics: rearing environment changes the performance of parasites. This mechanism arises when the environmental conditions in which a parasite is produced impact its performance—independently from the current environment. To illustrate the potential for ‘rearing effects’, we show how temperature influences infection risk (transmission rate) in a Daphnia-fungus disease...

Data from: Extensive introgression in a malaria vector species complex revealed by phylogenomics

Michael C. Fontaine, James B. Pease, Aaron Steele, Robert M. Waterhouse, Daniel E. Neafsey, Igor V. Sharakhov, Xiofang Jiang, Andrew B. Hall, Flaminia Catteruccia, Evdoxia Kakani, Sarah N. Mitchell, Yi-Chieh Wu, Hilary A. Smith, R. Rebecca Love, Mara K. Lawniczak, Michel A. Slotman, Scott J. Emrich, Matthew W. Hahn & Nora J. Besansky
Introgressive hybridization is now recognized as a widespread phenomenon, but its role in evolution remains contested. Here we use newly available reference genome assemblies to investigate phylogenetic relationships and introgression in a medically important group of Afrotropical mosquito sibling species. We have identified the correct species branching order to resolve a contentious phylogeny, and show that lineages leading to the principal vectors of human malaria were among the first to split. Pervasive autosomal introgression between...

Data from: The nutritionally responsive transcriptome of the polyphenic beetle Onthophagus taurus and the importance of sexual dimorphism and body region

Teiya Kijimoto, Emilie C. Snell-Rood, Melissa H. Pespeni, Guilherme Rocha, Karen Kafadar & Armin P. Moczek
Developmental responses to nutritional variation represent one of the ecologically most important classes of adaptive plasticity. However, knowledge of genome-wide patterns of nutrition-responsive gene expression is limited. Here, we studied genome-wide transcriptional responses to nutritional variation and their dependency on trait and sex in the beetle Onthophagus taurus. We find that averaged across the transcriptome, nutrition contributes less to overall variation in gene expression than do sex or body region, but that for a modest...

Data from: A multispecies coalescent model for quantitative traits

Fabio K. Mendes, Jesualdo A. Fuentes-González, Joshua G. Schraiber & Matthew W. Hahn
We present a multispecies coalescent model for quantitative traits that allows for evolutionary inferences at micro- and macroevolutionary scales. A major advantage of this model is its ability to incorporate genealogical discordance underlying a quantitative trait. We show that discordance causes a decrease in the expected trait covariance between more closely related species relative to more distantly related species. If unaccounted for, this outcome can lead to an overestimation of a trait's evolutionary rate, to...

Data from: Fossils reveal the complex evolutionary history of the mammalian regionalized spine

Katrina Elizabeth Jones, K. D. Angielczyk, P. D. Polly, J. J. Head, V. Fernandez, J. K. Lungmus, S. Tulga & S. E. Pierce
A unique characteristic of mammals is a vertebral column with anatomically distinct regions, but when and how this trait evolved remains unknown. Here we reconstruct vertebral regions and their morphological disparity in the extinct forerunners of mammals, the non-mammalian synapsids, to elucidate the evolution of mammalian axial differentiation. Mapping patterns of regionalization and disparity (heterogeneity) across amniotes reveals that both traits increased during synapsid evolution. However, the onset of regionalization predates increased heterogeneity. Based on...

Data from: Seasonally sympatric but allochronic: differential expression of hypothalamic genes in a songbird during gonadal development

Carolyn M. Bauer, Adam M. Fudickar, Skylar Anderson-Buckingham, Mikus Abolins-Abols, Jonathan W. Atwell, Ellen D. Ketterson & Timothy J. Greives
Allochrony, the mismatch of reproductive schedules, is one mechanism that can mediate sympatric speciation and diversification. In songbirds, the transition into breeding condition and gonadal growth is regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis at multiple levels. We investigated whether the difference in reproductive timing between two, seasonally sympatric subspecies of dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis) was related to gene expression along the HPG axis. During the sympatric pre-breeding stage, we measured hypothalamic and testicular mRNA expression...

Data from: The population genomics of sunflowers and genomic determinants of protein evolution revealed by RNAseq

Sébastien Renaut, Christopher J. Grassa, Brook T. Moyers, Nolan C. Kane, Loren H. Rieseberg, Christopher Grassa, Brook Moyers, Nolan Kane & Loren Rieseberg
Few studies have investigated the causes of evolutionary rate variation among plant nuclear genes, especially in recently diverged species still capable of hybridizing in the wild. The recent advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) permits investigation of genome wide rates of protein evolution and the role of selection in generating and maintaining divergence. Here, we use individual whole-transcriptome sequencing (RNAseq) to refine our understanding of the population genomics of a wild species of sunflowers (Helianthus...

Data from: Genomics of Compositae crops: reference transcriptome assemblies, and evidence of hybridization with wild relatives

Kathryn A. Hodgins, Zhao Lai, Luiz O. Oliveira, David W. Still, Moira Scascitelli, Michael S. Barker, Nolan C. Kane, Hannes Dempewolf, Alex Kozik, Richard V. Kesseli, John M. Burke, Richard W. Michelmore & Loren H. Rieseberg
Although the Compositae harbours only two major food crops, sunflower and lettuce, many other species in this family are utilized by humans and have experienced various levels of domestication. Here we have used next generation sequencing technology to develop 15 reference transcriptome assemblies for Compositae crops or their wild relatives. These data allow us to gain insight into the evolutionary and genomic consequences of plant domestication. Specifically, we performed Illumina sequencing of Cichorium endivia, Cichorium...

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