14 Works

Data from: Targeted re-sequencing of coding DNA sequences for SNP discovery in non-model species

Daniel W. Förster, James K. Bull, Dorina Lenz, Marijke Autenrieth, Johanna L.A. Paijmans, Robert H.S. Kraus, Carsten Nowak, Helmut Bayerl, Ralph Kuehn, Alexander P. Saveljev, Magda Sindičić, Michael Hofreiter, Krzysztof Schmidt, Joerns Fickel, Johanna L. A. Paijmans & Robert H. S. Kraus
Targeted capture coupled with high throughput sequencing can be used to gain information about nuclear sequence variation at hundreds to thousands of loci. Divergent reference capture makes use of molecular data of one species to enrich target loci in other (related) species. This is particularly valuable for non-model organisms, for which often no a priori knowledge exists regarding these loci. Here, we have used targeted capture to obtain data for 809 nuclear coding DNA sequences...

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: Minimal effects on genetic structuring of a fungus-dwelling saproxylic beetle after recolonization of a restored forest

Sharon E. Zytynska, Inken Doerfler, Martin M. Gossner, Sarah Sturm, Wolfgang W. Weisser & Jörg Müller
1. Habitat restoration aims to improve local habitat conditions for threatened species. While such restorations are widespread, rigorous evaluations of their success are rare. This is especially true of those considering species dynamics. Increasingly, deadwood is a target for forest restoration as many species directly and indirectly depend on this resource. 2. In a broadleaf forest in southern Germany, we explored the effect of landscape-wide deadwood restoration on the population genetic structure of the specialist...

Data from: Membrane-assisted extraction of monoterpenes: from in-silico solvent screening towards biotechnological process application

Lars Janoschek, Ljubomir Grozdev & Sonja Berensmeier
This work focuses on the process development of membrane-assisted solvent extraction of hydrophobic compounds such as monoterpenes. Beginning with the choice of suitable solvents, quantum chemical calculations with the simulation tool COSMO-RS were carried out to predict the partition coefficient (logP) of (S)-(+)-carvone and terpinen-4-ol in various solvent-water systems and validated afterwards with experimental data. COSMO-RS results show good prediction accuracy for nonpolar solvents like n-hexane, ethyl acetate and n-heptane even in the presence of...

Data from: Portable bacteria-capturing chip for direct surface-enhanced Raman scattering identification of urinary tract infection pathogens

Danting Yang, Haibo Zhou, Nicoleta E. Dina & Christoph Haisch
Acute urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common nosocomial bacterial infections, which affect almost 50% of the population at least once in their lifetime. UTIs may lead to lethal consequences if they are left undiagnosed and untreated properly. Early, rapid and accurate uropathogens detection methods play a pivotal role in clinical process. In this work, a portable bacteria-grasping surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) chip for identification of three species of uropathogens (E. coli...

Data from: Epigenetic mapping of the Arabidopsis metabolome reveals mediators of the epigenotype-phenotype map

Rik Kooke, Lionel Morgado, Frank FM Becker, Henriette Van Eekelen, Rashmi Hazarika, Qunfeng F Zheng, Ric CH De Vos, Frank Johannes & Joost JB Keurentjes
Identifying the sources of natural variation underlying metabolic differences between plants will enable a better understanding of plant metabolism and provide insights into the regulatory networks that govern plant growth and morphology. So far, however, the contribution of epigenetic variation to metabolic diversity has been largely ignored. In the present study, we utilized a panel of Arabidopsis thaliana epigenetic recombinant inbred lines (epiRILs) to assess the impact of epigenetic variation on the metabolic composition. Thirty...

Data from: Explaining European fungal fruiting phenology with climate variability

Carrie Andrew, Einar Heegaard, Klaus Høiland, Beatrice Senn-Irlet, Thomas W. Kuyper, Irmgard Krisai-Greilhuber, Paul M. Kirk, Jacob Heilmann-Clausen, Alan C. Gange, Simon Egli, Claus Bässler, Ulf Büntgen, Lynne Boddy & Håvard Kauserud
Here we assess the impact of geographically dependent (latitude, longitude and altitude) changes in bioclimatic (temperature, precipitation and primary productivity) variability on fungal fruiting phenology across Europe. Two main nutritional guilds of fungi, saprotrophic and ectomycorrhizal, were further separated into spring and autumn fruiters. We used a path‐analysis to investigate how biogeographic patterns in fungal fruiting phenology coincided with seasonal changes in climate and primary production. Across central to northern Europe, mean fruiting varied by...

Data from: Does metabolism constrain bird and mammal ranges and predict shifts in response to climate change?

Lauren B. Buckley, Imran Khaliq, David L. Swanson & Christian Hof
Mechanistic approaches for predicting the ranges of endotherms are needed to forecast their responses to environmental change. We test whether physiological constraints on maximum metabolic rate and the factor by which endotherms can elevate their metabolism (metabolic expansibility) influence cold range limits for mammal and bird species. We examine metabolic expansibility at the cold range boundary (MECRB) and whether species’ traits can predict variability in MECRB and then use MECRB as an initial approach to...

Data from: Additive effects of plant chemotype, mutualistic ants and predators on aphid performance and survival

Matthias Senft, Mary V. Clancy, Wolfgang W. Weisser, Joerg-Peter Schnitzler & Sharon E. Zytynska
1. Cascading effects in ecological systems acting across three or more trophic levels can be either of a resource-based (bottom-up) or natural enemy-based (top-down) nature. But, due to their complexity these effects are often considered separately and their relative strength, acting simultaneously, remains unknown. 2. In a semi-natural field experiment using tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.) and the specialised tansy aphid Metopeurum fuscoviride Stroyan as a model system, we compared the effects of four distinct plant...

Data from: Positive biodiversity-productivity relationships in forests: climate matters

Herve Jactel, Emmanuel S. Gritti, Lars Drössler, David I. Forrester, William L. Mason, Xavier Morin, Hans Pretzsch & Bastien Castagneyrol
While it is widely acknowledged that forest biodiversity contributes to climate change mitigation through improved carbon sequestration, conversely how climate affects tree species diversity - forest productivity relationships is still poorly understood. We combined the results of long-term experiments where forest mixtures and corresponding monocultures were compared on the same site to estimate the yield of mixed-species stands at a global scale, and its response to climatic factors. We found positive mixture effects on productivity...

Data from: Independent effects of host and environment on the diversity of wood-inhabiting fungi

Franz-Sebastian Krah, Sebastian Seibold, Roland Brandl, Petr Baldrian, Jörg Müller & Claus Bässler
1. Dead wood is a habitat for numerous fungal species, many of which are important agents of decomposition. Previous studies suggested that wood-inhabiting fungal communities are affected by climate, availability of dead wood in the surrounding landscape and characteristics of the colonized dead-wood object (e.g. host tree species). These findings indicate that different filters structure fungal communities at different scales, but how these factors individually drive fungal fruiting diversity on dead-wood objects is unknown. 2....

Data from: A comprehensive analysis of autocorrelation and bias in home range estimation

Michael J. Noonan, Marlee A. Tucker, Christen H. Fleming, Tom S. Akre, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Jeanne Altmann, Pamela C. Antunes, Jerrold L. Belant, Dean Beyer, Niels Blaum, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, , Rogerio De Paula Cunha, Jasja Dekker, Jonathan Drescher-Lehman, Nina Farwig, Claudia Fichtel, Christina Fischer, Adam T. Ford, Jacob R. Goheen, René Janssen, Florian Jeltsch, Matthew Kauffman, Peter M. Kappeler … & Justin M. Calabrese
Home range estimation is routine practice in ecological research. While advances in animal tracking technology have increased our capacity to collect data to support home range analysis, these same advances have also resulted in increasingly autocorrelated data. Consequently, the question of which home range estimator to use on modern, highly autocorrelated tracking data remains open. This question is particularly relevant given that most estimators assume independently sampled data. Here, we provide a comprehensive evaluation of...

Data from: Association of in utero persistent organic pollutant exposure with placental thyroid hormones

Zhong-Min Li, David Hernandez-Moreno, Katharina Maria Main, Niels Erik Skakkebæk, Hannu Kiviranta, Jorma Toppari, Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen, Heqing Shen, Karl-Werner Schramm & Meri De Angelis
In utero exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) can result in thyroid function disorder, leading to concerns about their impact on fetal and neonatal development. The present study was performed to investigate the associations between placental levels of various POPs and thyroid hormones (THs). In a prospective Danish study initially established for assessing congenital cryptorchidism, 58 placenta samples were collected from mothers of boys born with (28) and without (30) cryptorchidism. The concentrations of polybrominated...

Data from: Filamentation and restoration of normal growth in Escherichia coli using a combined CRISPRi sgRNA/antisense RNA approach

Andrea Mückl, Matthaeus Schwarz-Schilling, Katrin Fischer & Friedrich C. Simmel
CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) using dCas9-sgRNA is a powerful tool for the exploration and manipulation of gene functions. Here we quantify the reversible switching of a central process of the bacterial cell cycle by CRISPRi and an antisense RNA mechanism. Reversible induction of filamentous growth in E. coli has been recently demonstrated by controlling the expression levels of the bacterial cell division proteins FtsZ/FtsA via CRISPRi. If FtsZ falls below a critical level, cells cannot divide....

Registration Year

  • 2018
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • Technical University Munich
    14
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    3
  • University of Potsdam
    3
  • Helmholtz Zentrum München
    2
  • University of Würzburg
    2
  • Princeton University
    2
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • Michigan Department of Natural Resources
    2
  • Senckenberg Nature Research Society
    2