123 Works

Data from: Evolutionary factors affecting the cross-species utility of newly developed microsatellite markers in seabirds

Yoshan Moodley, Juan F. Masello, Gopi K. Munimanda, Theresa L. Cole, Marco R. Thali, Rachael Alderman, Richard J. Cuthbert, Manuel Marin, Melanie Massaro, Joan Navarro, Richard A. Phillips, Peter G. Ryan, Cristián G. Suazo, Yves Cherel, Henri Weimerskirch, Petra Quillfeldt & Luciano Calderon
Microsatellite loci are ideal for testing hypotheses relating to genetic segregation at fine spatio-temporal scales. They are also conserved among closely related species, making them potentially useful for clarifying interspecific relationships between recently diverged taxa. However, mutations at primer binding sites may lead to increased nonamplification, or disruptions that may result in decreased polymorphism in nontarget species. Furthermore, high mutation rates and constraints on allele size may also with evolutionary time, promote an increase in...

Data from: Using a butterflyfish genome as a general tool for RAD-Seq studies in specialized reef fish

Joseph D. DiBattista, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Marek J. Piatek, Xin Wang, Manuel Aranda & Michael L. Berumen
Data from a large-scale restriction site associated DNA (RAD-Seq) study of nine butterflyfish species in the Red Sea and Arabian Sea provided a means to test the utility of a recently published draft genome (Chaetodon austriacus) and assess apparent bias in this method of isolating nuclear loci. We here processed double-digest restriction-site (ddRAD) associated DNA sequencing data to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and their associated function with and without our reference genome to...

Data from: Debugging diversity – a pan‐continental exploration of the potential of terrestrial blood‐feeding leeches as a vertebrate monitoring tool

Ida Bærholm Schnell, Kristine Bohmann, Sebastian E. Schultze, Stine R. Richter, Dáithí C. Murray, Mikkel-Holger S. Sinding, David Bass, John E. Cadle, Mason J. Campbell, Rainer Dulch, David P. Edwards, Thomas N. E. Gray, Teis Hansen, Anh N. Q. Hoa, Christina Lehmkuhl Noer, Sigrid Heise-Pavlov, Adam F. Sander Pedersen, Juliot C. Ramamonjisoa, Mark E. Siddall, Andrew Tilker, Carl Traeholt, Nicholas Wilkinson, Paul Woodcock, Douglas W. Yu, Mads Frost Bertelsen … & Ida Baerholm Schnell
The use of environmental DNA (eDNA) has become an applicable non-invasive tool with which to obtain information about biodiversity. A sub-discipline of eDNA is iDNA (invertebrate-derived DNA), where genetic material ingested by invertebrates is used to characterise the biodiversity of the species that served as hosts. While promising, these techniques are still in their infancy, as they have only been explored on limited numbers of samples from only a single or a few different locations....

Data from: Point process models for presence-only analysis

Ian W. Renner, Jane Elith, Adrian Baddeley, William Fithian, Trevor Hastie, Steven Phillips, Gordana Popovic & David I. Warton
1. Presence-only data are widely used for species distribution modelling, and point process regression models are a exible tool that has considerable potential for this problem, when data arise as point events. 2. In this paper we review point process models, some of their advantages, and some common methods of fitting them to presence-only data. 3. Advantages include (and are not limited to): clarification of what the response variable is that is modelled; a framework...

Data from: Applying the multistate capture-recapture robust design to characterize metapopulation structure

Delphine Chabanne, Kenneth H. Pollock, Hugh Finn, Lars Bejder & Delphine B. H. Chabanne
1. Population structure must be considered when developing mark-recapture (MR) study designs as the sampling of individuals from multiple populations (or subpopulations) may increase heterogeneity in individual capture probability. Conversely, the use of an appropriate MR study design which accommodates heterogeneity associated with capture-occasion varying covariates due to animals moving between ‘states’ (i.e. geographic sites) can provide insight into how animals are distributed in a particular environment and the status and connectivity of subpopulations. 2....

Data from: A questionnaire study of injections prescribed and dispensed for patients diagnosed with mild/moderate community-acquired pneumonia in Mongolia

Gereltuya Dorj, Bruce Sunderland, Delia Hendrie & Richard W. Parsons
Purpose. The study aimed to determine the extent of and factors influencing the prescribing of injections for the treatment of mild/moderate community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Mongolia. Methods. Questionnaires were developed and administered to medication providers (34 Pharmacists, 27 pharmacy technicians) and prescribers (22 general doctors and 49 medical specialists) working in Mongolia. Results. Cefalosporins were prescribed for patients with mild pneumonia and doctors tended to prescribe injectable cefalosporins (cefazolin) rather than oral dosage forms....

Data from: Evaluating multilocus Bayesian species delimitation for discovery of cryptic mycorrhizal diversity

Michael R. Whitehead, Renee A. Catullo, Monica Ruibal, Kingsley W. Dixon, Rod Peakall & Celeste C. Linde
The increasing availability of DNA sequence data enables exciting new opportunities for fungal ecology. However, it amplifies the challenge of how to objectively classify the diversity of fungal sequences into meaningful units, often in the absence of morphological characters. Here, we test the utility of modern multilocus Bayesian coalescent-based methods for delimiting cryptic fungal diversity in the orchid mycorrhiza morphospecies Serendipita vermifera. We obtained 147 fungal isolates from Caladenia, a speciose clade of Australian orchids...

Data from: Integrated evidence reveals a new species in the ancient blue coral genus Heliopora (Octocorallia)

Zoe T. Richards, Nina Yasuda, Taisei Kikuchi, Taryn Foster, Chika Mitsuyuki, Michael Stat, Yoshihisa Suyama & Nerida G. Wilson
Maintaining the accretion potential and three dimensional structure of coral reefs is a priority but reef-building scleractinian corals are highly threatened and retreating. Hence future reefs are predicted to be dominated by non-constructional taxa. Since the Late Triassic however, other non-scleractinian anthozoans such as Heliopora have contributed to tropical and subtropical reef-building. Heliopora is an ancient and highly conserved reef building octocoral genus within the monospecific Family Helioporidae, represented by a single extant species –...

Voucher specimen image of Krueger 26 (Utricularia gibba; Lentibulariaceae).

Thilo Krueger

The evolution of autotomy in leaf-footed bugs

Zachary Emberts, Colette M St. Mary, Cody Coyotee Howard, Michael Forthman, Philip W. Bateman, Ummat Somjee, Wei Song Hwang, Daiqin Li, Rebecca T Kimball & Christine W Miller
Sacrificing body parts is one of many behaviors that animals use to escape predation. This trait, termed autotomy, is classically associated with lizards. However, several other taxa also autotomize, and this trait has independently evolved multiple times throughout Animalia. Despite having multiple origins and being an iconic anti-predatory trait, much remains unknown about the evolution of autotomy. Here, we combine morphological, behavioral, and genomic data to investigate the evolution of autotomy within leaf-footed bugs and...

A large scale temporal and spatial eDNA biodiversity survey of offshore marine vertebrates in Brazil following the upriver Fundão tailings dam failure

Rose Lines, Manjeeti Juggernauth, Georgia Peverley, Tiffany Simpson, Mahsa Mousavi-Derazmahalleh, Michael Bunce, Tina Berry, James Keating, Alice Taysom & Phillip Whittle
Seawater contains a wealth of genetic information, which represents the biodiversity of numerous species residing within a particular marine habitat. eDNA metabarcoding offers a cost effective, non-destructive method for large scale monitoring of environments, as diverse taxonomic groups are easily detected using metabarcoding assays. Monitoring marine environments along a coastline and over a number of seasons can reveal changes in these environments and provide information for management decisions following an impact event. Following the Fundão...

Arctic shrub colonization lagged peak postglacial warmth: Molecular evidence in lake sediment from Arctic Canada

Sarah Crump, Gifford Miller, Matthew Power, Julio Sepúlveda, Nadia Dildar, Megan Coghlan & Michael Bunce
Arctic shrubification is an observable consequence of climate change, already resulting in ecological shifts and global-scale climate feedbacks including changes in land surface albedo and enhanced evapotranspiration. However, the rate at which shrubs can colonize previously glaciated terrain in a warming world is largely unknown. Reconstructions of past vegetation dynamics in conjunction with climate records can provide critical insights into shrubification rates and controls on plant migration, but paleoenvironmental reconstructions based on pollen may be...

The applicability of eDNA metabarcoding approaches for sessile benthic surveying in the Kimberley region, north-western Australia

Katrina West, Arne Adam, Nicole White, Will Robbins, Daniel Barrow, Adrian Lane & Zoe Richards
The application of environmental DNA technologies is a promising new approach to rapidly audit biodiversity across large-scale, remote regions. Here, we examine the efficacy of a dual-assay eDNA metabarcoding approach for sessile benthic bioassessments in the turbid waters of the Lalang-garram Marine Parks, in the inshore Kimberley region, north-western Australia. We ask three principal questions: 1. Is the eDNA released by sessile benthic taxa (i.e. hard and soft corals, sponges and tunicates) locally detectable? 2....

The construction of small-scale, quasi-mechanistic spatial models of insect energetics in habitat restoration: a case study of beetles in Western Australia

Sean Tomlinson
Aim: The management and restoration of ecological processes mediated by biotic interactions is now broadly advocated, and may be achieved by the targeting restoration towards key agents. Although theoretically examined, a practical approach to incorporating the physiology and energetics of insects into restoration planning is poorly articulated. I aimed to provide a case study using the thermal biology and energetics of beetles to identify the distribution of habitat suitability in a large restoration landscape. Location:...

Data from: Association of putatively adaptive genetic variation with climatic variables differs between a parasite and its host

Sheree Walters, Todd Robinson, Margaret Byrne, Grant Wardell-Johnson & Paul Nevill
Parasitism is a pervasive phenomenon in nature with the relationship between species driving evolution in both the parasite and host. Due to their host-dependent lifestyle, parasites may adapt to the abiotic environment in ways that differ from their hosts or from free living relatives; yet rarely has this been assessed. Here, we test two competing hypotheses related to whether putatively adaptive genetic variation in a specialist mistletoe associates with the same, or different, climatic variables...

Effect of in-situ mineral dissolution on high salinity of flowback water during hydraulic fracturing in shales

Lingping Zeng, Nathan Reid, Yunhu Lu, Mofazzal Hossain, Ali Saeedi & Quan Xie
Hydraulic fracturing has been widely implemented to enhance hydrocarbon production from shale reservoirs. However, one of the main challenges during hydraulic fracturing is to understand the high salinity of flowback water (up to 300,000 mg/L). While several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the controlling factor behind this phenomenon, less attention has been paid to quantify the contribution of fluid-shale interactions such as mineral dissolution and surface complexation on fluid salinity. We thus conducted spontaneous...

Nalanthamala psidii supplementary data

, Anita Severn-Ellis, Maritha Schoeman, Philipp Bayer, James K. Hane, Jasper G. Rees, Dave Edwards & Jacqueline Batley

Voucher specimen image of Krueger 24 (Drosera margaritacea; Droseraceae).

Thilo Krueger

Data from: Resistance and resilience to changing climate and fire regime depend on plant functional traits

Neal J. Enright, Joseph B. Fontaine, Byron B. Lamont, Ben P. Miller & Vanessa C. Westcott
Changing disturbance-climate interactions will drive shifts in plant communities: these effects are not adequately quantified by environmental niche models used to predict future species distributions. We quantified the effects of more frequent fire and lower rainfall - as projected to occur under a warming and drying climate - on population responses of shrub species in biodiverse Mediterranean-climate type shrublands near Eneabba, southwestern Australia. Using experimental fires, we measured the density of all shrub species for...

Data from: It is premature to regard the ego-depletion effect as ‘too incredible’

Martin S. Hagger & Nikos L. D. Chatzisarantis
The ‘strength’ model conceptualizes self-control as a limited resource (Baumeister et al., 1998). Individuals are able to exert self-control, but only for a limited period after which capacity declines leading to reduced self-control capacity; a state known as ego-depletion. The model has generated a sizable literature confirming the ego-depletion effect in multiple spheres. Our meta-analysis of published ego-depletion studies computed a medium-sized effect (d=0.62) across 198 tests (Hagger et al., 2010). Carter and McCullough (2013)...

Data from: Genetic signatures through space, time and multiple disturbances in a ubiquitous brooding coral

Jim N. Underwood, Zoe T. Richards, Karen J. Miller, Marji L. Puotinen & James P. Gilmour
The predominance of self-recruitment in many reef-building corals has fundamental and complex consequences for their genetic diversity, population persistence and responses to climate change. Knowledge of genetic structure over local scales needs to be placed within a broad spatial context, and also integrated with genetic monitoring through time to disentangle these consequences. Here, we examined patterns of genetic diversity over multiple spatio-temporal scales across tropical Australia in the ubiquitous brooding coral, Seriatopora hystrix. We also...

Data from: Vocalisations of killer whales (Orcinus orca) in the Bremer Canyon, Western Australia

Rebecca Wellard, Christine Erbe, Leila Fouda & Michelle Blewitt
To date, there has been no dedicated study in Australian waters on the acoustics of killer whales. Hence no information has been published on the sounds produced by killer whales from this region. Here we present the first acoustical analysis of recordings collected off the Western Australian coast. Underwater sounds produced by Australian killer whales were recorded during the months of February and March 2014 and 2015 in the Bremer Canyon in Western Australia. Vocalisations...

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