16 Works

Data from: New populations of the black-flanked rock-wallaby (Petrogale lateralis) from the Little Sandy Desert and Murchison, Western Australia

Jeff M. Turpin, Nicole E. White, Judy A. Dunlop & M. J. Bamford
During two independent fauna surveys, rock-wallaby (Petrogale) scats were recorded from caves located outside the current known Petrogale distribution. Scats collected from Desert Queen Baths (Little Sandy Desert, Western Australia, 2012), and the Barr Smith Range (Murchison, Western Australia, 2015) were genetically analysed and a follow-up motion camera survey confirmed an extant rock-wallaby population at Desert Queen Baths. The combination of sampling techniques overcame the detection difficulties associated with rare and cryptic taxa, and together...

Data from: Habitat-based species distribution modelling of the Hawaiian deepwater snapper-grouper complex

Zack. S. Oyafuso, Jeffrey C. Drazen, Cordelia H. Moore & Erik C. Franklin
Deepwater snappers and groupers are valuable components of many subtropical and tropical fisheries globally and understanding the habitat associations of these species is important for spatial fisheries management. Habitat-based species distribution models were developed for the deepwater snapper-grouper complex in the main Hawaiian Islands (MHI). Six eteline snappers (Pristipomoides spp., Aphareus rutilans, and Etelis spp.) and one endemic grouper (Hyporthodus quernus) comprise the species complex known as the Hawaiian Deep Seven Bottomfishes. Species occurrence was...

Data from: Demonstrating multiple benefits from periodically harvested fisheries closures

Jordan S. Goetze, Joachim Claudet, Fraser Januchowski-Hartley, Timothy J. Langlois, Shaun K. Wilson, Crow White, Rebecca Weeks & Stacy D. Jupiter
1.Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) are one of the most common forms of fisheries management in Melanesia, demonstrating multiple objectives, including sustaining fish stocks and increasing catch efficiency to support small-scale fisheries. No studies have comprehensively assessed their ability to provide short-term fisheries benefits across the entire harvest regime. 2.We present a novel analytical framework to guide a meta-analysis and assist future research in conceptualizing and assessing the potential of PHCs to deliver benefits for multiple...

Data from: Precipitation drives global variation in natural selection

Adam Siepielski, Michael B. Morrissey, Mathieu Buoro, Stephanie M. Carlson, Christina M. Caruso, Sonya M. Clegg, Tim Coulson, Joseph DiBattista, Kiyoko M. Gotanda, Clinton D. Francis, Joe Hereford, Joel G. Kingsolver, Kate E. Augustine, Loeske E. B. Kruuk, Ryan A. Martin, Ben C. Sheldon, Nina Sletvold, Erik I. Svensson, Michael J. Wade & Andrew D. C. MacColl
Climate change has the potential to affect the ecology and evolution of every species on Earth. Although the ecological consequences of climate change are increasingly well documented, the effects of climate on the key evolutionary process driving adaptation—natural selection—are largely unknown. We report that aspects of precipitation and potential evapotranspiration, along with the North Atlantic Oscillation, predicted variation in selection across plant and animal populations throughout many terrestrial biomes, whereas temperature explained little variation. By...

Data from: Using a butterflyfish genome as a general tool for RAD-Seq studies in specialized reef fish

Joseph D. DiBattista, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Marek J. Piatek, Xin Wang, Manuel Aranda & Michael L. Berumen
Data from a large-scale restriction site associated DNA (RAD-Seq) study of nine butterflyfish species in the Red Sea and Arabian Sea provided a means to test the utility of a recently published draft genome (Chaetodon austriacus) and assess apparent bias in this method of isolating nuclear loci. We here processed double-digest restriction-site (ddRAD) associated DNA sequencing data to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and their associated function with and without our reference genome to...

Data from: Applying the multistate capture-recapture robust design to characterize metapopulation structure

Delphine Chabanne, Kenneth H. Pollock, Hugh Finn, Lars Bejder & Delphine B. H. Chabanne
1. Population structure must be considered when developing mark-recapture (MR) study designs as the sampling of individuals from multiple populations (or subpopulations) may increase heterogeneity in individual capture probability. Conversely, the use of an appropriate MR study design which accommodates heterogeneity associated with capture-occasion varying covariates due to animals moving between ‘states’ (i.e. geographic sites) can provide insight into how animals are distributed in a particular environment and the status and connectivity of subpopulations. 2....

Data from: Evaluating multilocus Bayesian species delimitation for discovery of cryptic mycorrhizal diversity

Michael R. Whitehead, Renee A. Catullo, Monica Ruibal, Kingsley W. Dixon, Rod Peakall & Celeste C. Linde
The increasing availability of DNA sequence data enables exciting new opportunities for fungal ecology. However, it amplifies the challenge of how to objectively classify the diversity of fungal sequences into meaningful units, often in the absence of morphological characters. Here, we test the utility of modern multilocus Bayesian coalescent-based methods for delimiting cryptic fungal diversity in the orchid mycorrhiza morphospecies Serendipita vermifera. We obtained 147 fungal isolates from Caladenia, a speciose clade of Australian orchids...

Data from: The behavioural response of migrating humpback whales to a full seismic air gun array

Rebecca A. Dunlop, Michael J. Noad, Robert D. McCauley, Eric Kniest, Robert Slade, David Paton & Douglas H. Cato
Despite concerns on the effects of noise from seismic survey air guns on marine organisms, there remains uncertainty in the biological significance of any response. This study quantifies and interprets the response of migrating humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) to a 3130 cui (51.3l) commercial air gun array. We compare the behavioural responses to active trials (array operational; n = 34 whale groups), with responses to control trials (source vessel towing the array while silent; n...

Data from: Ecosystem biomonitoring with eDNA: metabarcoding across the tree of life in a tropical marine environment

Michael Stat, Megan J. Huggett, Rachele Bernasconi, Joseph D. DiBattista, Tina E. Berry, Stephen J. Newman, Euan S. Harvey & Michael Bunce
Effective marine management requires comprehensive data on the status of marine biodiversity. However, efficient methods that can document biodiversity in our oceans are currently lacking. Environmental DNA (eDNA) sourced from seawater offers a new avenue for investigating the biota in marine ecosystems. Here, we investigated the potential of eDNA to inform on the breadth of biodiversity present in a tropical marine environment. Directly sequencing eDNA from seawater using a shotgun approach resulted in only 0.34%...

Data from: High intra-ocean, but limited inter-ocean genetic connectivity in populations of the deep-water oblique-banded snapper Pristipomoides zonatus (Pisces: Lutjanidae)

W. Jason Kennington, Peter W. Keron, Euan S. Harvey, Corey B. Wakefield, Ashley J. Williams, Tuikolongahau Halafihi & Stephen J. Newman
While many studies have investigated connectivity and subdivision in marine fish occupying tropical, shallow water reef habitats, relatively few have been conducted on commercially important deep-water species in the Indo-Pacific region. Here, we examine spatial and temporal genetic variation in the deep-water oblique-banded snapper Pristipomoides zonatus, collected from eight locations across the Indian and Pacific Oceans. A total of 292 individuals were screened for genetic variation at six nuclear microsatellite loci and the cytochrome c...

Data from: DNA metabarcoding for diet analysis and biodiversity: A case study using the endangered Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea)

Tina E. Berry, Sylvia K. Osterrieder, Dáithí C. Murray, Megan L. Coghlan, Anthony J. Richardson, Alicia K. Grealy, Michael Stat, Lars Bejder & Michael Bunce
The analysis of apex predator diet has the ability to deliver valuable insights into ecosystem health, and the potential impacts a predator might have on commercially relevant species. The Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea) is an endemic apex predator and one of the world's most endangered pinnipeds. Given that prey availability is vital to the survival of top predators, this study set out to understand what dietary information DNA metabarcoding could yield from 36 sea...

Data from: Naturally occurring hybrids of coral reef butterflyfishes have similar fitness compared to parental species

Stefano R. Montanari, Jean-Paul A. Hobbs, Morgan S. Pratchett, Line K. Bay & Lynne Van Herwerden
Hybridisation can produce evolutionary novelty by increasing fitness and adaptive capacity. Heterosis, or hybrid vigour, has been documented in many plant and animal taxa, and is a notable consequence of hybridisation that has been exploited for decades in agriculture and aquaculture. On the contrary, loss of fitness in naturally occurring hybrid taxa has been observed in many cases. This can have negative consequences for the parental species involved (wasted reproductive effort), and has raised concerns...

Data from: Assessing the utility of eDNA as a tool to survey reef-fish communities in the Red Sea

Joseph D. DiBattista, Darren J. Coker, Tane H. Sinclair-Taylor, Michael Stat, Michael L. Berumen & Michael Bunce
Relatively small volumes of water may contain sufficient environmental DNA (eDNA) to detect target aquatic organisms via genetic sequencing. We therefore assessed the utility of eDNA to document the diversity of coral reef fishes in the central Red Sea. DNA from seawater samples was extracted, amplified using fish-specific 16S mitochondrial DNA primers, and sequenced using a metabarcoding workflow. DNA sequences were assigned to taxa using available genetic repositories or custom genetic databases generated from reference...

Data from: Seascape genomics reveals fine-scale patterns of dispersal for a reef fish along the ecologically divergent coast of Northwestern Australia

Joseph D. DiBattista, Michael J. Travers, Glenn I. Moore, Richard D. Evans, Stephen J. Newman, Ming Feng, Samuel D. Moyle, Rebecca J. Gorton, Thor Saunders & Oliver Berry
Understanding the drivers of dispersal among populations is a central topic in marine ecology and fundamental for spatially explicit management of marine resources. The extensive coast of Northwestern Australia provides an emerging frontier for implementing new genomic tools to comparatively identify patterns of dispersal across diverse and extreme environmental conditions. Here, we focused on the stripey snapper (Lutjanus carponotatus), which is important to recreational, charter-based and customary fishers throughout the Indo-West Pacific. We collected 1,016...

Data from: Assessing the trophic ecology of top predators across a recolonisation frontier using DNA metabarcoding of diets

Natasha Hardy, Tina Berry, Brendan P. Kelaher, Simon D. Goldsworthy, Michael Bunce, Melinda A. Coleman, Bronwyn M. Gillanders, Sean D. Connell, Michelle Blewitt, Will Figueira, BM Gillanders, SD Connell, BP Kelaher & SD Goldsworthy
Top predator populations, once intensively hunted, are rebounding in size and geographic distribution. The cessation of sealing along coastal Australia and subsequent recovery of Australian Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus and long-nosed A. forsteri fur seals represents a unique opportunity to investigate trophic linkages at a frontier of predator recolonisation. We characterised the diets of both species across 2 locations of recolonisation, one site an established breeding colony, and the other, a new but permanent haul-out site....

Data from: Scrutinizing key steps for reliable metabarcoding of environmental samples

Antton Alberdi, Ostaizka Aizpurua, M. Thomas P. Gilbert & Kristine Bohmann
1. Metabarcoding of environmental samples has many challenges and limitations that require carefully considered laboratory and analysis pipelines to ensure reliable results. We explore how decisions regarding study design, laboratory work and bioinformatic processing affect the final results, and provide guidelines for reliable study of environmental samples. 2. We evaluate the performance of four primer sets targeting COI and 16S regions characterising arthropod diversity in bat faecal samples, and investigate how metabarcoding results are affected...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    16

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    16

Affiliations

  • Curtin University
    16
  • University of Western Australia
    4
  • James Cook University
    3
  • Murdoch University
    2
  • Australian National University
    2
  • King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
    2
  • University of Sydney
    2
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    2
  • Department of Parks and Wildlife
    2
  • California Polytechnic State University
    1