6 Works

Data from: Convergence of soil nitrogen isotopes across global climate gradients

Joseph M. Craine, Andrew J. Elmore, Lixin Wang, Laurent Augusto, W. Troy Baisden, E. N. J. Brookshire, Michael D. Cramer, Niles J. Hasselquist, Erik A. Hobbie, Ansgar Kahmen, Keisuke Koba, J. Marty Kranabetter, Michelle C. Mack, Erika Marin-Spiotta, Jordan R. Mayor, Kendra K. McLauchlan, Anders Michelsen, Gabriela B. Nardoto, Rafael S. Oliveira, Steven S. Perakis, Pablo L. Peri, Carlos A. Quesada, Andreas Richter, Louis A. Schipper, Bryan A. Stevenson … & Bernd Zeller
Quantifying global patterns of terrestrial nitrogen (N) cycling is central to predicting future patterns of primary productivity, carbon sequestration, nutrient fluxes to aquatic systems, and climate forcing. With limited direct measures of soil N cycling at the global scale, syntheses of the 15N:14N ratio of soil organic matter across climate gradients provide key insights into understanding global patterns of N cycling. In synthesizing data from over 6000 soil samples, we show strong global relationships among...

Data from: Breaking and remaking a seed and seed predator interaction in the introduced range of Scotch Broom (Cytisus scoparius) in New Zealand

Quentin Paynter, Yvonne M. Buckley, Paul Peterson, Allan Hugh Gourlay & Simon V. Fowler
Introduced plants may initially experience enemy release but some of those interactions may be reinstated through biological control. These cases provide opportunities to explore the dynamics of broken and re-made consumer-resource interactions. The European shrub broom (Cytisus scoparius) was introduced to New Zealand without a specialist seed predator (Bruchidius villosus) until a biological control programme reinstated this interaction in 1988. Broom produces substantially larger seeds throughout its non-native range and there are differences in seedling...

Data from: An invasive non-native mammal population conserves genetic diversity lost from its native range

Andrew J. Veale, Olivia J. Holland, Robbie A. McDonald, Mick N. Clout, Dianne Gleeson & D.M. Gleeson
Invasive, non-native species are one of the major causes of global biodiversity loss. Although they are, by definition, successful in their non-native range, their populations generally show major reductions in their genetic diversity during the demographic bottleneck they experience during colonization. By investigating the mitochondrial genetic diversity of an invasive non-native species, the stoat Mustela erminea, in New Zealand and comparing it to diversity in the species’ native range in Great Britain, we reveal the...

Data from: Cost-effective large-scale occupancy–abundance monitoring of invasive brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) on New Zealand’s Public Conservation Land

Andrew M. Gormley, David M. Forsyth, Elaine F. Wright, John Lyall, Mike Elliott, Mark Martini, Benno Kappers, Mike Perry & Meredith McKay
There is interest in large-scale and unbiased monitoring of biodiversity status and trend, but there are few published examples of such monitoring being implemented. The New Zealand Department of Conservation is implementing a monitoring program that involves sampling selected biota at the vertices of an 8-km grid superimposed over the 8.6 million hectares of public conservation land that it manages. The introduced brushtail possum (Trichosurus Vulpecula) is a major threat to some biota and is...

Data from: The Trojan Female Technique for pest control: a candidate mitochondrial mutation confers low male fertility across diverse nuclear backgrounds in Drosophila melanogaster

Damian K. Dowling, Daniel M. Tompkins & Neil J. Gemmell
Pest species represent a major ongoing threat to global biodiversity. Effective management approaches are required that regulate pest numbers, while minimizing collateral damage to nontarget species. The Trojan Female Technique (TFT) was recently proposed as a prospective approach to biological pest control. The TFT draws on the evolutionary hypothesis that maternally inherited mitochondrial genomes are prone to the accumulation of male, but not female, harming mutations. These mutations could be harnessed to provide trans-generational fertility-based...

Data from: Parallel molecular routes to cold adaptation in eight genera of New Zealand stick insects

Alice B. Dennis, Luke T. Dunning, Brent J. Sinclair & Thomas R. Buckley
The acquisition of physiological strategies to tolerate novel thermal conditions allows organisms to exploit new environments. As a result, thermal tolerance is a key determinant of the global distribution of biodiversity, yet the constraints on its evolution are not well understood. Here we investigate parallel evolution of cold tolerance in New Zealand stick insects, an endemic radiation containing three montane-occurring species. Using a phylogeny constructed from 274 orthologous genes, we show that stick insects have...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Landcare Research
    6
  • École Nationale Supérieure des Sciences Agronomiques de Bordeaux-Aquitaine
    1
  • Federal University of São Carlos
    1
  • University of Waikato
    1
  • Copenhagen Zoo
    1
  • Trinity College
    1
  • University of Otago
    1
  • National Institute of Amazonian Research
    1
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    1
  • National University of Austral Patagonia
    1