6 Works

Data from: Interspecies interference and monitoring duration affect detection rates in chew cards

Olivia R. Burge, Dave Kelly & Janet M. Wilmshurst
Pest monitoring methods should provide unbiased accurate estimates of pest densities and locations, while also minimizing time-in-field and costs. Recent pest mammal monitoring studies have found that chew cards are more effective than conventional mammal monitoring methods, but little experimental work has been done to determine optimal experimental duration or quantify the risks of saturation by one species biasing detections of other species. Here, we used chew cards in three sites within Awarua wetland (Southland,...

Data from: Priority effects are interactively regulated by top-down and bottom-up forces: evidence from wood decomposer communities

Devin R. Leopold, J. Paula Wilkie, Ian A. Dickie, Robert B. Allen, Peter K. Buchanan & Tadashi Fukami
Both top-down (grazing) and bottom-up (resource availability) forces can determine the strength of priority effects, or the effects of species arrival history on the structure and function of ecological communities, but their combined influences remain unresolved. To test for such influences, we assembled experimental communities of wood-decomposing fungi using a factorial manipulation of fungivore (Folsomia candida) presence, nitrogen availability, and fungal assembly history. We found interactive effects of all three factors on fungal species composition...

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity of plant-soil feedbacks increases per capita reproductive biomass of species at an establishment disadvantage

Jean H. Burns, Angela J. Brandt, Jennifer E. Murphy, Angela M. Kaczowka & David J. Burke
Plant–soil feedbacks have been widely implicated as a driver of plant community diversity, and the coexistence prediction generated by a negative plant–soil feedback can be tested using the mutual invasibility criterion: if two populations are able to invade one another, this result is consistent with stable coexistence. We previously showed that two co-occurring Rumex species exhibit negative pairwise plant–soil feedbacks, predicting that plant–soil feedbacks could lead to their coexistence. However, whether plants are able to...

Data from: Glyphosate redirects wetland vegetation trajectory following willow invasion

Olivia R. Burge, Kerry A. Bodmin, Beverley R. Clarkson, Scott Bartlam, Corinne H. Watts & Chris C. Tanner
Aims: Aerially applied glyphosate is an economic tool to deal with large areas of invasive plants. However, there are few studies investigating non-target effects or rates of reinvasion, particularly over multi-year timeframes. The aims were to evaluate the effectiveness of aerial application of glyphosate for control of dense stands of the invasive grey willow Salix cinerea, and determine the vegetation trajectory over the subsequent two years. Location: Whangamarino Wetland, Waikato, New Zealand. Methods: A before-after...

Data from: Analysis of the genome of the New Zealand giant collembolan (Holacanthella duospinosa) sheds light on hexapod evolution

Chen Wu, Melissa D. Jordan, Richard D. Newcomb, Neil J. Gemmell, Sarah Bank, Karen Meusemann, Peter K. Dearden, Elizabeth J. Duncan, Sefanie Grosser, Kim Rutherford, Paul P. Gardner, Ross N. Crowhurst, Bernd Steinwender, Leah K. Tooman, Mark I. Stevens & Thomas R. Buckley
Background: The New Zealand collembolan genus Holacanthella contains the largest species of springtails (Collembola) in the world. Using Illumina technology we have sequenced and assembled a draft genome and transcriptome from Holacanthella duospinosa (Salmon). We have used this annotated assembly to investigate the genetic basis of a range of traits critical to the evolution of the Hexapoda, the phylogenetic position of H. duospinosa and potential horizontal gene transfer events. Results: Our genome assembly was ~375...

Data from: Habitat filtering determines the functional niche occupancy of plant communities worldwide

Yuanzhi Li, Bill Shipley, Jodi N. Price, Vinícius De L. Dantas, Riin Tamme, Mark Westoby, Andrew Siefert, Brandon S. Schamp, Marko J. Spasojevic, Vincent Jung, Daniel C. Laughlin, Sarah J. Richardson, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Christian Schöb, Antonio Gazol, Honor C. Prentice, Nicolas Gross, Jacob Overton, Marcus V. Cianciaruso, Frédérique Louault, Chiho Kamiyama, Tohru Nakashizuka, Kouki Hikosaka, Takehiro Sasaki, Masatoshi Katabuchi … & Marco A. Batalha
How the patterns of niche occupancy vary from species-poor to species-rich communities is a fundamental question in ecology that has a central bearing on the processes that drive patterns of biodiversity. As species richness increases, habitat filtering should constrain the expansion of total niche volume, while limiting similarity should restrict the degree of niche overlap between species. Here, by explicitly incorporating intraspecific trait variability, we investigate the relationship between functional niche occupancy and species richness...

Registration Year

  • 2017
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Landcare Research
    6
  • University of Canterbury
    2
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Goiás
    1
  • Lincoln University
    1
  • Stanford University
    1
  • Université de Sherbrooke
    1
  • Federal University of São Carlos
    1
  • Charles Sturt University
    1
  • Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig
    1