10 Works

Data from: Upwelling as the major source of nitrogen for shallow and deep reef-building corals across an oceanic atoll system

Veronica Z. Radice, Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Brian Fry, Michael D. Fox & Sophie G. Dove
Oceanographic processes shape coral reefs worldwide by redistributing inorganic nutrients and particulate resources over depth. Deep‐water upwelling occurs frequently in coral reef ecosystems, but its impact on coral nutrition remains unclear. This study investigated the influence of upwelling on the trophic ecology of three common reef‐building corals (Galaxea fascicularis, Pachyseris speciosa and Pocillopora verrucosa) from different reef depths (shallow reef, 10 m, vs. deep reef, 30 m) and reef exposures (oceanic rim vs. Inner Sea)...

Network analysis reveals underlying syntactic features in a vocally learnt mammalian display, humpback whale song

Jennifer Allen, Ellen Garland, Rebecca Dunlop & Michael Noad
Vocal communication systems have a set of rules that govern the arrangement of acoustic signals, broadly defined as ‘syntax’. However, there is a limited understanding of potentially shared or analogous rules across vocal displays in different taxa. Recent work on songbirds has investigated syntax using network-based modelling. This technique quantifies features such as connectivity (adjacent signals in a sequence) and recurring patterns. Here, we apply network-based modelling to the complex, hierarchically structured songs of humpback...

Data from: Disentangling serology to elucidate henipa‐ and filovirus transmission in Madagascar fruit bats

Cara E. Brook, Hafaliana C. Ranaivoson, Christopher C. Broder, Andrew A. Cunningham, Jean-Michel Heraud, Alison J. Peel, Louise Gibson, James L. N. Wood, C. Jessica Metcalf & Andrew P. Dobson
Bats are reservoirs for emerging human pathogens, including Hendra and Nipah henipaviruses and Ebola and Marburg filoviruses. These viruses demonstrate predictable patterns in seasonality and age structure across multiple systems; previous work suggests that they may circulate in Madagascar's endemic fruit bats, which are widely consumed as human food. We aimed to (a) document the extent of henipa‐ and filovirus exposure among Malagasy fruit bats, (b) explore seasonality in seroprevalence and serostatus in these bat...

Macroimmunology: the drivers and consequences of spatial patterns in wildlife immune defense

Daniel Becker, Gregory Albery, Maureen Kessler, Tamika Lunn, Caylee Falvo, Gábor Czirják, Lynn Martin & Raina Plowright
1. Spatial variation in parasite pressure, abiotic and biotic conditions, and anthropogenic factors can all shape immune phenotypes across spatial scales. Identifying the most important spatial drivers of immunity could help preempt infectious disease risks, especially in the context of how large-scale factors such as urbanization affect defense by changing environmental conditions. 2. We provide a synthesis of how to apply macroecological approaches to the study of ecoimmunology (i.e., macroimmunology). We first review spatial factors...

Data from: On and off the rocks: persistence and ecological diversification in a tropical Australian lizard radiation

Paul M. Oliver, Lauren G. Ashman, Sarah Bank, Rebecca J. Laver, Renae C. Pratt, Leonardo G. Tedeschi & Craig C. Moritz
Background: Congruent patterns in the distribution of biodiversity between regions or habitats suggest that key factors such as climatic and topographic variation may predictably shape evolutionary processes. In a number of tropical and arid biomes, genetic analyses are revealing deeper and more localised lineage diversity in rocky ranges than surrounding habitats. Two potential drivers of localised endemism in rocky areas are refugial persistence through climatic change, or ecological diversification and specialisation. Here we examine how...

Data from: Tracing the rise of malignant cell lines: distribution, epidemiology and evolutionary interactions of two transmissible cancers in Tasmanian devils

Samantha James, Geordie Jennings, Young Mi Kwon, Maximilian Stammnitz, Alexandra Fraik, Andrew Storfer, Sebastien Comte, David Pemberton, Samantha Fox, Bill Brown, Ruth Pye, Gregory Woods, Bruce Lyons, Paul Hohenlohe, Hamish McCallum, Hannah V. Siddle, Frederic Thomas, Beata Ujvari, Elizabeth P. Murchison, Menna Jones & Rodrigo Hamede
Emerging infectious diseases are rising globally and understanding host-pathogen interactions during the initial stages of disease emergence is essential for assessing potential evolutionary dynamics and designing novel management strategies. Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) are endangered due to a transmissible cancer – devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) – that since its emergence in the 1990’s, has affected most populations throughout Tasmania. Recent studies suggest that devils are adapting to the DFTD epidemic and that disease-induced extinction...

Data from: Recovery of decomposition rates and decomposer invertebrates during rainforest restoration on disused pasture

Marisa J. Stone, Luke Shoo, Nigel E. Stork, Fran Sheldon & Carla P. Catterall
Converting forest to pasture can alter the roles of biota in ecosystem functioning, while vegetation restoration should arguably assist functional recovery. Since tests of this are scarce, this study quantifies both litter decomposition rates and their association with decomposer invertebrates, across 25 sites representing different phases of deforestation and subsequent reforestation of rainforest. Open and closed (to exclude macro-invertebrates) mesh bags containing forest leaves were exposed in the field for up to eight months, and...

Data from: Rate of inter-sex interactions affects injury likelihood in Tasmanian devil contact networks

David G. Hamilton, Menna E. Jones, Elissa Z. Cameron, Hamish McCallum, Andrew Storfer, Paul A. Hohenlohe & Rodrigo K. Hamede
Identifying the types of contacts that result in disease transmission is important for accurately modelling and predicting transmission dynamics and disease spread in wild populations. We investigated contacts within a population of adult Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) over a six-month period and tested whether individual-level contact patterns were correlated with accumulation of bite wounds. Bite wounds are important in the spread of devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), a clonal cancer cell line transmitted through direct...

Data from: Are all rivers equal? The role of education in attitudes towards temporary and perennial rivers

Catherine Leigh, Kate S. Boersma, Mark L. Galatowitsch, Victoria S. Milner & Rachel Stubbington
Temporary rivers (TRs) are prevalent, biodiverse ecosystems yet often overlooked and underprotected. This may be because inadequate understanding of their ecosystem services leaves them undervalued by society. However, evidence of negative attitudes towards TRs is scant. We investigated the strength and extent of negative attitudes by surveying undergraduate students from Australia, UK, and USA on their agreement (positive attitude) or disagreement (negative attitude) with statements about the ecosystem services, moral consideration, and protection of perennial...

Data from: Heritability of plumage colour morph variation in a wild population of promiscuous, long-lived Australian magpies

Ana E. Dobson, Daniel J. Schmidt & Jane M. Hughes
Colour polymorphisms have evolutionary significance for the generation and maintenance of species diversity. Demonstrating heritability of polymorphic traits can be challenging for wild populations of long-lived species because accurate information is required on trait expression and familial relationships. The Australian magpie Cracticus tibicen has a continent-wide distribution featuring several distinct plumage morphs, differing primarily in colour of back feathers. Black or white backed morphs occur in eastern Australia, with intermediate morphs common in a narrow...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    10

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    10

Affiliations

  • Griffith University
    10
  • University of Queensland
    3
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • University of Tasmania
    2
  • University of Idaho
    2
  • Washington State University
    2
  • Princeton University
    1
  • Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment
    1
  • Centre College
    1
  • Australian National University
    1