4 Works

Data from: The contribution of maternal effects to selection response: an empirical test of competing models

Joel William McGlothlin & Laura F. Galloway
Maternal effects can dramatically influence the evolutionary process, in some cases facilitating and in others hindering adaptive evolution. Maternal effects have been incorporated into quantitative genetic models using two theoretical frameworks: the variance-components approach, which partitions variance into direct and maternal components, and the trait-based approach, which assumes that maternal effects are mediated by specific maternal traits. Here, we demonstrate parallels between these models and test their ability to predict evolutionary change. First, we show...

Data from: Are thyroid hormones mediators of incubation temperature-induced phenotypes in birds?

Sarah E. DuRant, Amanda W. Carter, Robert J. Denver, Gary R. Hepp & William A. Hopkins
Incubation temperature influences a suite of traits in avian offspring. However, the mechanisms underlying expression of these phenotypes are unknown. Given the importance of thyroid hormones in orchestrating developmental processes, we hypothesized that they may act as an upstream mechanism mediating the effects of temperature on hatchling phenotypic traits such as reduced growth and thermoregulation. We found that plasma T3, but not T4 concentrations, differed among newly-hatched wood ducks (Aix sponsa) from different embryonic incubation...

Data from: Convergent evolution of sexual dimorphism in skull shape using distinct developmental strategies

Emma Sherratt, Joel William McGlothlin, , Jonathan B. Losos, Arhat Abzhanov, Thomas J. Sanger & Edmund D. Brodie
Studies integrating evolutionary and developmental analyses of morphological variation are of growing interest to biologists as they promise to shed fresh light on the mechanisms of morphological diversification. Sexually dimorphic traits tend to be incredibly divergent across taxa. Such diversification must arise through evolutionary modifications to sex differences during development. Nevertheless, few studies of dimorphism have attempted to synthesize evolutionary and developmental perspectives. Using geometric morphometric analysis of head shape for 50 Anolis species, we...

Data from: Multiple aspects of plasticity in clutch size vary among populations of a globally distributed songbird

David F. Westneat, Veronika Bókony, Terry Burke, Olivier Chastel, Henrik Jensen, Thomas Kvalnes, Ádám Z. Lendvai, András Liker, Douglas Mock, Julia Schroeder, P. L. Schwagmeyer, Gabriele Sorci & Ian R. K. Stewart
1. Plasticity in life-history characteristics can influence many ecological and evolutionary phenomena, including how invading organisms cope with novel conditions in new locations or how environmental change affects organisms in native locations. Variation in reaction norm attributes is a critical element to understanding plasticity in life history, yet we know relatively little about the ways in which reaction norms vary within and among populations. 2. We amassed data on clutch size from marked females in...

Registration Year

  • 2013
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Affiliations

  • Virginia Tech
    4
  • University of Virginia
    2
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1
  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    1
  • University of Nottingham
    1
  • Oklahoma State University
    1
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    1
  • University of Kentucky
    1
  • Auburn University
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  • Harvard University
    1