10 Works

Data from: Relationships between forest cover and fish diversity in the Amazon River floodplain

Caroline C. Arantes, Kirk O. Winemiller, Miguel Petrere, Leandro Castello, Laura L. Hess, Carlos E.C. Freitas & Carlos E. C. Freitas
1.Habitat degradation leads to biodiversity loss and concomitant changes in ecosystem processes. Tropical river floodplains are highly threatened by land cover changes and support high biodiversity and important ecosystems services, but the extent to which changes in floodplain land cover affect fish biodiversity remains unknown. 2.We combined fish and environmental data collected in situ and satellite-mapped landscape features to evaluate how fish species with different ecological strategies and assemblage structures respond to deforestation in floodplains...

Data from: Use of a rostral appendage during social interactions in the Ecuadorian Anolis proboscis

Diego R. Quirola, Andrés Mármol, Omar Torres-Carvajal, Andrea Narvaez, Fernando Ayala-Varela & Ignacio T. Moore
The use of sexually selected characters in inter- and intra-sexual interactions has long been of interest to evolutionary biologists. Recently, a distinction between sexually selected traits as ornaments versus weapons has been advanced. We investigated the behaviour of an enigmatic lizard with a prominent sexually dimorphic trait in an effort to describe whether the trait was the product of sexual selection and further whether it functioned as a weapon or an ornament. The subject of...

Data from: Life histories and invasions: accelerated laying rate and incubation time in an invasive lizard, Anolis sagrei

Tamara L. Fetters & Joel W. McGlothlin
Faster life histories are correlated with greater invasion success across taxa. However, comparisons of life-history traits across native and invasive ranges are rare, and thus it is unknown whether invasions lead directly to evolutionary shifts in life histories. Here we compare life history traits of three invasive populations of brown anoles (Anolis sagrei) to a representative native population. In a common garden, we measured a number of reproductive traits including egg-laying rate and incubation period....

Data from: Changing measurements or changing movements? Sampling scale and movement model identifiability across generations of biologging technology

Leah R. Johnson, Philipp H. Boersch-Supan, Richard A. Phillips & Sadie J. Ryan
1. Animal movement patterns contribute to our understanding of variation in breeding success and survival of individuals, and the implications for population dynamics. 2. Over time, sensor technology for measuring movement patterns has improved. Although older technologies may be rendered obsolete, the existing data are still valuable, especially if new and old data can be compared to test whether a behavior has changed over time. 3. We used simulated data to assess the ability to...

Data from: A bird-like skull in a Triassic diapsid reptile increases heterogeneity of the morphological and phylogenetic radiation of Diapsida

Adam C. Pritchard & Sterling J. Nesbitt
The Triassic Period saw the first appearance of numerous amniote lineages (e.g. Lepidosauria, Archosauria, Mammalia) that defined Mesozoic ecosystems following the end Permian Mass Extinction, as well as the first major morphological diversification of crown-group reptiles. Unfortunately, much of our understanding of this event comes from the record of large-bodied reptiles (total body length > 1 m). Here we present a new species of drepanosaurid (small-bodied, chameleon-like diapsids) from the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation of...

Data from: Variable drivers of primary versus secondary nesting: density-dependence and drought effects on greater sage-grouse

Erik J. Blomberg, Daniel Gibson, Michael T. Atamian & James S. Sedinger
Organisms seek to maximize fitness by balancing reproductive allocations against mortality risk, given selection pressures inherent to the environment. However, environmental conditions are often dynamic and unpredictable, which complicates the ability to achieve such a balance, and may require reproductive adjustments depending on prevailing conditions. We evaluated the effects of density-dependent, density-independent (drought), and individual (age, body condition) factors on nesting decisions of female greater sage-grouse in the American Great Basin. We obtained relocations and...

Data from: The earliest bird-line archosaurs and the assembly of the dinosaur body plan

Sterling J. Nesbitt, Richard J. Butler, Martin D. Ezcurra, Paul M. Barrett, Michelle R. Stocker, Kenneth D. Angielczyk, Roger M. H. Smith, Christian A. Sidor, Grzegorz Niedźwiedzki, Andrey G. Sennikov & Alan J. Charig
The relationship between dinosaurs and other reptiles is well established, but the sequence of acquisition of dinosaurian features has been obscured by the scarcity of fossils with transitional morphologies. The closest extinct relatives of dinosaurs either have highly derived morphologies or are known from poorly preserved or incomplete material. Here we describe one of the stratigraphically lowest and phylogenetically earliest members of the avian stem lineage (Avemetatarsalia), Teleocrater rhadinus gen. et sp. nov., from the...

Data from: Exposure to dairy manure leads to greater antibiotic resistance and increased mass-specific respiration in soil microbial communities

Carl Wepking, Bethany Avera, Brian Badgley, John E. Barrett, Josh Franklin, Katharine F. Knowlton, Partha P. Ray, Crystal Smitherman & Michael S. Strickland
Intensifying livestock production to meet the demands of a growing global population coincides with increases in both the administration of veterinary antibiotics and manure inputs to soils. These trends have the potential to increase antibiotic resistance in soil microbial communities. The effect of maintaining increased antibiotic resistance on soil microbial communities and the ecosystem processes they regulate is unknown. We compare soil microbial communities from paired reference and dairy manure-exposed sites across the USA. Given...

Data from: Transcriptomic imprints of adaptation to fresh water: parallel evolution of osmoregulatory gene expression in the Alewife

Jonathan P. Velotta, Jill L. Wegrzyn, Samuel Ginzburg, Lin Kang, Sergiusz Czesny, Rachel J. O'Neill, Stephen D. McCormick, Pawel Michalak & Eric T. Schultz
Comparative approaches in physiological genomics offer an opportunity to understand the functional importance of genes involved in niche exploitation. We used populations of Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) to explore the transcriptional mechanisms that underlie adaptation to fresh water. Ancestrally anadromous Alewives have recently formed multiple, independently derived, landlocked populations, which exhibit reduced tolerance of saltwater and enhanced tolerance of fresh water. Using RNA-seq, we compared transcriptional responses of an anadromous Alewife population to two landlocked populations...

Data from: Diversity and stability of egg-bacterial assemblages: the role of paternal care in the glassfrog Hyalinobatrachium colymbiphyllum

Myra C. Hughey, Jesse Delia & Lisa K. Belden
Embryos of oviparous organisms must cope with harsh environments and are especially susceptible to disease, considering that many immune mechanisms do not develop until later in life. Parents may transmit symbiotic microflora to eggs, which can contribute to embryo immune defense. Despite the importance of symbiotic microbes for immune function and survival of adult amphibians, vertical transfer of symbionts in amphibians has received less attention than in other taxa. Here, we test the role of...

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  • Virginia Tech
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  • Field Museum of Natural History
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  • Institute of Paleontology A A Borisyak
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  • Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture
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  • University of Maine
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  • Texas A&M University
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  • University of Nevada Reno
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  • British Antarctic Survey
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  • La Trobe University
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  • Federal University of Amazonas
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