353 Works

Data from: Collective behavior and colony persistence of social spiders depends on their physical environment

Ambika Kamath, Skylar D. Primavera, Colin M. Wright, Grant N. Doering, Kirsten A. Sheehy, Noa Pinter-Wollman & Jonathan N. Pruitt
The physical environment occupied by group-living animals can profoundly affect their cooperative social interactions and therefore their collective behavior and success. These effects can be especially apparent in human-modified habitats, which often harbor substantial variation in the physical environments available within them. For nest-building animal societies, this influence of the physical environment on collective behavior can be mediated by the construction of nests—nests could either buffer animal behavior from changes in the physical environment or...

The release of inertial instability near an idealized zonal jet

Callum Thompson & David M. Schultz
Inertial instability is a hydrodynamic instability that occurs in strong anticyclonic flow and is typically diagnosed by negative absolute vorticity in the Northern Hemisphere. As such, inertial instability is often observed on the anticyclonic-shear side of jet streams, yet the release of the instability in this environment is still poorly understood. We simulate the release of inertial instability near an idealized midlatitude zonal jet compared a control simulation with no instability. We find that the...

Data for: Sex-specific differences in swimming, aerobic metabolism, and recovery from exercise in adult coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) across ecologically relevant temperatures

Krista Kraskura, Emily Hardison & Erika Eliason
Adult female Pacific salmon can have highermigrationmortality rates thanmales, particularly at warm temperatures. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain a mystery. Given the importance of swimming energetics on fitness, we measured critical swim speed, swimming metabolism, cost of transport, aerobic scope (absolute and factorial) and exercise recovery in adult female and male coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) held for 2 days at 3 environmentally relevant temperatures (9oC, 14oC, 18oC) in fresh water. Critical swimming performance...

Data on Authorship Gender in Ranked, Unranked, and Interdisciplinary Philosophy Journals (JSTOR Database, 1900-2010)

Sherri Conklin, Nicole Hassoun, Michael Nekrasov & Jevin West
This data includes information on authorship gender in Leiter Ranked, Unranked, and Interdisciplinary Philosophy Journals between 1900 & 2010.

“Take my word for it”: Group Texts and Testimonials Enhance State and Federal Student Aid Applications

Jason Jabbari, Stephen Roll, Sam Bufe & Jessica McKay

Spatial uncertainty in herbarium data: Simulated displacement but not error distance alters estimates of phenological sensitivity to climate in a widespread California wildflower

Devin Gamble & Susan Mazer
Herbarium records provide a broad spatial and temporal range with which to investigate plant responses to environmental change. Research on plant phenology and its sensitivity to climate has advanced with the increasing availability of digitized herbarium specimens, but limitations of specimen-derived data can undermine the inferences derived from such research. One issue that has received little attention is collection site uncertainty (i.e., error distance), a measure of confidence in the location from which a specimen...

Effect of thermal variation on the cardiac thermal limits of a eurythermal marine teleost (Girella nigricans)

Gail D. Schwieterman, Emily A. Hardison & Erika J. Eliason
Although most animals live in complex, thermally variable environments, the impact of this variability on specific physiological systems is still unresolved. The ectotherm heart is known to change in both structure and function to ensure appropriate oxygen delivery under different thermal regimes, but the plasticity of the upper thermal limits of the heart under stable or variable thermal acclimation conditions remains unknown. To investigate the role of thermal variability on cardiac acclimation potential, we acclimated...

LOOKing for Multi-word Expressions in American Sign Language

Lynn Hou
Usage-based linguistics postulates that multi-word expressions constitute a substantial part of language structure and use, and are formed through repeated chunking and stored as exemplar wholes. They are also re-used to produce new sequences by means of schematization. While there is extensive research on multi-word expressions in many spoken languages, little is known about the status of multi-word expressions in the mainstream U.S. variety of American Sign Language (ASL). This paper investigates recurring multi-word expressions,...

Perceptions of seaweed aquaculture in Santa Barbara and Ventura counties

Sydney Rilum, Janelle Gaun, Madeline McEwen & Laurel Wee
Marine seaweed aquaculture provides sustainable forms of food, fertilizers, and pharmaceuticals while potentially contributing to nutrient mitigation, habitat creation, and short-term carbon sequestration. The industry in the United States is underdeveloped due to a combination of economic, social, and regulatory constraints. These constraints exist in California where there is an insufficient understanding of how the public and key stakeholder groups perceive seaweed aquaculture, which appears to limit political support for or against further developing the...

Data from: To treat or Not to Treat? Experimental Pathogen Exposure, Treatment, and Release of a Threatened Amphibian

Andrea Adams, Jessie Bushell & Robert Grasso
Species reintroductions may mitigate the effects of severe amphibian declines, but chytridiomycosis—the often-deadly amphibian disease caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd)—can hinder these efforts. Exposing amphibians to the pathogen ex-situ may improve disease outcomes post-release. We experimentally inoculated the federally threatened California red-legged frog (Rana draytonii) ex situ, cleared Bd infections, then released them to the wild for monitoring in an area where Bd is present. Ex situ, previously-exposed frogs had lower Bd...

Literatura Digital Brasileira: uma abordagem sistêmica

Rejane Rocha
A emergência e a popularização dos novos meios (MANOVICH, 2005) têm alterado substancialmente a produção, a circulação, a leitura e os parâmetros de avaliação e crítica dos objetos culturais, dentre eles a literatura. O desenvolvimento do projeto (CNPq 405609/2018-3) Repositório da literatura digital brasileira, nos últimos três anos, evidenciou e especificou essas alterações no contexto brasileiro, gerando dados, informações e pesquisas a ele atreladas que sugerem o delineamento inicial de um sistema literário (EVEN-ZOHAR, 2017)...

Additional file 1 of A haplotype-resolved genome assembly of the Nile rat facilitates exploration of the genetic basis of diabetes

Huishi Toh, Chentao Yang, Giulio Formenti, Kalpana Raja, Lily Yan, Alan Tracey, William Chow, Kerstin Howe, Lucie A. Bergeron, Guojie Zhang, Bettina Haase, Jacquelyn Mountcastle, Olivier Fedrigo, John Fogg, Bogdan Kirilenko, Chetan Munegowda, Michael Hiller, Aashish Jain, Daisuke Kihara, Arang Rhie, Adam M. Phillippy, Scott A. Swanson, Peng Jiang, Dennis O. Clegg, Erich D. Jarvis … & Yury V. Bukhman
Additional file 1: Figure S1. Venn diagram of gene lists linked to type 2 diabetes by different types of evidence. Figure S2. Heterozygosity inferred by comparing the paternal and maternal scaffolded contigs, shown on the paternal scaffolds. Figure S3. Length distributions of structural variants. Figure S4. Functional classification of duplicated genes. Figure S5. Sequence alignment of Nile rat Gckr proteins to 113 mammalian orthologs. Figure S6. Missing Nile rat Hadh gene present in alternate haplotype...

BBOBS_Noise_Properties_Review

Helen Janiszewski, Zachary Eilon, Joshua Russell, Brennan Brunsvik, James Gaherty, Stephen Mosher, William Hawley & Sloan Coats
We present a new compilation and analysis of broadband ocean bottom seismometer noise properties from 15 years of seismic deployments. We compile a comprehensive dataset of representative four-component (seismometer and pressure gauge) noise spectra and cross-spectral properties (coherence, phase, and admittance) for 551 unique stations spanning 18 US-led experiments. This is matched with a comprehensive compilation of metadata parameters related to instrumentation and environmental properties for each station. We systematically investigate the similarity of noise...

Additional file 1 of Comprehensive analysis of TCGA data reveals correlation between DNA methylation and alternative splicing

Shuting Lin, Soojin Yi & Peng Qiu
Additional file 1. Multi-cancer CpG-exon correlations. This file contains 36,470 CpG-exon correlations across all the cancer types, for CpG-exon pairs that show significant correlations in more than one cancer type.

Additional file 1 of Modeling the metabolic evolution of mixotrophic phytoplankton in response to rising ocean surface temperatures

Logan M. Gonzalez, Stephen R. Proulx & Holly V. Moeller
Additional file 1: Provides additional figures and analytical results for equations used in this study.

Modeling the metabolic evolution of mixotrophic phytoplankton in response to rising ocean surface temperatures

Logan M. Gonzalez, Stephen R. Proulx & Holly V. Moeller
Abstract Background Climate change is expected to lead to warming in ocean surface temperatures which will have unequal effects on the rates of photosynthesis and heterotrophy. As a result of this changing metabolic landscape, directional phenotypic evolution will occur, with implications that cascade up to the ecosystem level. While mixotrophic phytoplankton, organisms that combine photosynthesis and heterotrophy to meet their energetic and nutritional needs, are expected to become more heterotrophic with warmer temperatures due to...

Modeling the metabolic evolution of mixotrophic phytoplankton in response to rising ocean surface temperatures

Logan M. Gonzalez, Stephen R. Proulx & Holly V. Moeller
Abstract Background Climate change is expected to lead to warming in ocean surface temperatures which will have unequal effects on the rates of photosynthesis and heterotrophy. As a result of this changing metabolic landscape, directional phenotypic evolution will occur, with implications that cascade up to the ecosystem level. While mixotrophic phytoplankton, organisms that combine photosynthesis and heterotrophy to meet their energetic and nutritional needs, are expected to become more heterotrophic with warmer temperatures due to...

BEDMAP2 - Ice thickness, bed and surface elevation for Antarctica - standardised shapefiles and geopackages

Peter Fretwell, Hamish Pritchard, David Vaughan, Jonathan Bamber, N. Barrand, R.E. Bell, C Bianchi, Robert Bingham, Donald Blankenship, G. Casassa, Ginny Catania, D. Callens, H Conway, Alison Cook, Hugh Corr, D Damaske, V. Damn, Fausto Ferraccioli, Rene Forsberg, S. Fujita, Y. Gim, P. Gogineni, J. Griggs, Richard Hindmarsh, P. Holmlund … & Julien Bodart
We present here the Bedmap2 ice thickness, bed and surface elevation aggregated points and survey lines. The aggregated points consist of statistically-summarised shapefile points (centred on a continent-wide 500 m x 500 m grid) that reports the average values of ice thickness, bed and surface elevation from the full-resolution survey data and information on their distribution. The points presented here correspond to the additional points to Bedmap1 used for the gridding of Bedmap2. The data...

Dimethylxanthine REMPI Measurements for Maya Pottery Extracts

Mattanjah De Vries
Raw data of measurements on pottery extracts by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy at dual wavelengths, resonant for two methylxanthine derivatives, trimethylxanthine at 281.1 nm and dimethylxanthine at 281.5 nm.

Supplementary methods, tables, figures, and equations from Changes in invertebrate food web structure between high- and low-productivity environments are driven by intermediate but not top-predator diet shifts

Ana Miller-ter Kuile, Austen Apigo, An Bui, Kirsten Butner, Jasmine N. Childress, Stephanie Copeland, Bartholomew P. DiFiore, Elizabeth S. Forbes, Maggie Klope, Carina I. Motta, Devyn Orr, Katherine A. Plummer, Daniel L. Preston & Hillary S. Young
Predator–prey interactions shape ecosystem stability and are influenced by changes in ecosystem productivity. However, because multiple biotic and abiotic drivers shape the trophic responses of predators to productivity, we often observe patterns, but not mechanisms, by which productivity drives food web structure. One way to capture mechanisms shaping trophic responses is to quantify trophic interactions among multiple trophic groups and by using complementary metrics of trophic ecology. In this study, we combine two diet-tracing methods:...

Positive interactions between corals and damselfish increase coral resistance to temperature stress

Andrew Shantz, Mark Ladd, Leila Ezzat, Russell Schmitt, Sally Holbrook, Rebecca Vega Thurber, Deron Burkepile & Emily Schmeltzer
By the century’s end, many tropical seas will reach temperatures exceeding most coral species’ thermal tolerance on an annual basis. The persistence of corals in these regions will therefore depend on their abilities to tolerate recurrent thermal stress. Although ecologists have long recognized that positive interspecific interactions can ameliorate environmental stress to expand the realized niche of plants and animals, coral bleaching studies have largely overlooked how interactions with community members outside of the coral...

Supplementary methods, tables, figures, and equations from Changes in invertebrate food Web structure between high- and low-productivity environments are driven by intermediate but not top-predator diet shifts

Ana Miller-ter Kuile, Austen Apigo, An Bui, Kirsten Butner, Jasmine N. Childress, Stephanie Copeland, Bartholomew P. DiFiore, Elizabeth S. Forbes, Maggie Klope, Carina I. Motta, Devyn Orr, Katherine A. Plummer, Daniel L. Preston & Hillary S. Young
Predator–prey interactions shape ecosystem stability and are influenced by changes in ecosystem productivity. However, because multiple biotic and abiotic drivers shape the trophic responses of predators to productivity, we often observe patterns, but not mechanisms, by which productivity drives food Web structure. One way to capture mechanisms shaping trophic response is to quantify trophic interactions among multiple trophic groups and by using complementary metrics of trophic ecology. In this study, we combine two diet-tracing methods:...

Supplementary material from \"Changes in invertebrate food web structure between high- and low-productivity environments are driven by intermediate but not top-predator diet shifts\"

Ana Miller-ter Kuile, Austen Apigo, An Bui, Kirsten Butner, Jasmine N. Childress, Stephanie Copeland, Bartholomew P. DiFiore, Elizabeth S. Forbes, Maggie Klope, Carina I. Motta, Devyn Orr, Katherine A. Plummer, Daniel L. Preston & Hillary S. Young
Predator–prey interactions shape ecosystem stability and are influenced by changes in ecosystem productivity. However, because multiple biotic and abiotic drivers shape the trophic responses of predators to productivity, we often observe patterns, but not mechanisms, by which productivity drives food web structure. One way to capture mechanisms shaping trophic responses is to quantify trophic interactions among multiple trophic groups and by using complementary metrics of trophic ecology. In this study, we combine two diet-tracing methods:...

Depolarization block in olfactory sensory neurons expands the dimensionality of odor encoding

David Tadres, Philip Wong, Thuc To, Jeff Moehlis & Matthieu Louis
Upon strong and prolonged excitation, neurons can undergo a silent state called depolarization block that is often associated with disorders such as epileptic seizures. Here we show that neurons in the peripheral olfactory system undergo depolarization block as part of their normal physiological function. Typically, olfactory sensory neurons enter depolarization block at odor concentrations three orders of magnitude above their detection threshold, thereby defining receptive fields over concentration bands. The silencing of high-affinity olfactory sensory...

Global hotspots of shark interactions with industrial longline fisheries

Echelle S. Burns, Darcy Bradley & Lennon R. Thomas
We find shark catch risk hotspots in all ocean basins, with notable high-risk areas off Southwest Africa and in the Eastern Tropical Pacific. These patterns are mostly driven by more common species such as blue sharks, though risk areas for less common, Endangered and Critically Endangered species are also identified. Clear spatial patterns of shark fishing risk identified here can be leveraged to develop spatial management strategies for threatened populations. Sharks are susceptible to industrial...

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