193 Works

Data from: Phenotypic evolution shaped by current enzyme function in the bioluminescent courtship signals of sea fireflies

Nicholai M. Hensley, Emily A. Ellis, Gretchen A. Gerrish, Elizabeth Torres, John P. Frawley, Todd H. Oakley & Trevor J. Rivers
Mating behaviours are diverse and noteworthy, especially within species radiations where they may contribute to speciation. Studying how differences in mating behaviours arise between species can help us understand how diversity is generated at multiple biological levels. The bioluminescent courtship displays of cypridinid ostracods (or sea fireflies) are an excellent system for this since amazing variety evolves while using a conserved biochemical mechanism. We find that the evolution of one aspect in this behavioural phenotype...

Data from: Dermal denticle assemblages in coral reef sediments correlate with conventional shark surveys

Erin Dillon, Kevin Lafferty, Douglas McCauley, Darcy Bradley, Richard Norris, Jennifer Caselle, Graziella DiRenzo, Jonathan Gardner & Aaron O'Dea
It is challenging to assess long-term trends in mobile, long-lived, and relatively rare species such as sharks. Despite ongoing declines in many coastal shark populations, conventional surveys might be too fleeting and too recent to describe population trends over decades to millennia. Placing recent shark declines into historical context should improve management efforts as well as our understanding of past ecosystem dynamics. A new paleoecological approach for surveying shark abundance on coral reefs is to...

Data from: Laboratory culture of the California Sea Firefly Vargula tsujii (Ostracoda: Cypridinidae): developing a model system for the evolution of marine bioluminescence

Jessica A. Goodheart, Geetanjali Minsky, Mira N. Brynjegard-Bialik, Michael S. Drummond, J. David Munoz, Timothy R. Fallon, Darrin T. Schultz, Jing-Ke Weng, Elizabeth Torres & Todd H. Oakley
Bioluminescence, or the production of light by living organisms via chemical reaction, is widespread across Metazoa. Laboratory culture of bioluminescent organisms from diverse taxonomic groups is important for determining the biosynthetic pathways of bioluminescent substrates, which may lead to new tools for biotechnology and biomedicine. Some bioluminescent groups may be cultured, including some cnidarians, ctenophores, and brittle stars, but those use luminescent substrates (luciferins) obtained from their diets, and therefore are not informative for determination...

Social context, but not individual personality, alters immigrant viability in a spider with mixed social structure

Jessica Purcell, Spencer Ingley, Jonathan Pruitt & Inon Scharf
Immigrant viability is a major determinant of the realized rate of gene flow across populations. For social organisms, the social context in which immigrants disperse across contrasting environments may have important implications for their viability post dispersal. Here, we use social spiders whose individual personalities as well as group personality compositions vary across sites to test whether the strength of selection against immigrants (i.e. mortality rates) differs depending on whether spiders are transplanted (1) as...

Causes of delayed outbreak responses and their impacts on epidemic spread

Yun Tao, Matthew Ferrari, Katriona Shea, William Probeert, Michael Runge, Kevin Lafferty & Michael Tildesley
Livestock diseases have devastating consequences economically, socially, and politically across the globe. In certain systems, pathogens remain viable after host death, which enables residual transmissions from infected carcasses. Rapid culling and carcass disposal are well-established strategies for stamping out an outbreak and limiting its impact, however, wait-times for these procedures, i.e., response delays, are typically farm-specific and time-varying due to logistical constraints. Failing to incorporate variable response delays in epidemiological models may understate outbreak projections...

Putative resistance and tolerance mechanisms have little impact on disease progression for an emerging salamander pathogen

Mark Wilber, Edward Carter, Matthew Gray & Cheryl Briggs
1. Resistance and tolerance are unique host defense strategies that can limit the impacts of a pathogen on a host. However, for most wildlife-pathogen systems there are still fundamental uncertainties regarding 1) how changes in resistance and tolerance can affect disease outcomes and 2) the mechanisms underlying resistance and tolerance in host populations. 2. Here, we first compared observed patterns of resistance and tolerance and their effects on disease outcomes among salamander species that are...

Land use impacts on parasitic infection: A cross-sectional epidemiological study on the role of irrigated agriculture in schistosome infection in a dammed landscape

Andrea Lund, David Rehkopf, Susanne Sokolow, M. Moustapha Sam, Nicolas Jouanard, Anne-Marie Schacht, Simon Senghor, Assane Fall, Gilles Riveau, Giulio De Leo & David Lopez-Carr
Background: Water resources development promotes agricultural expansion and food security. But are these benefits offset by increased infectious disease risk? Dam construction on the Senegal River in 1986 was followed by agricultural expansion and increased transmission of human schistosomes. Yet the mechanisms linking these processes at the individual and household levels remain unclear. We investigated the association between household land use and schistosome infection in children. Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional household survey data (n =...

Data from: The genetic basis and experimental evolution of inbreeding depression in Caenorhabditis elegans

Ivo M. Chelo, S. Carvalho, M. Roque, S. R. Proulx & Henrique Teotónio
Determining the genetic basis of inbreeding depression is important for understanding the role of selection in the evolution of mixed breeding systems. Here, we investigate how androdioecy (a breeding system characterized by partial selfing and outcrossing) and dioecy (characterized by obligatory outcrossing) influence the experimental evolution of inbreeding depression in Caenorhabditis elegans. We derived inbred lines from ancestral and evolved populations and found that the dioecious lineages underwent more extinction than androdioecious lineages. For both...

Data from: Sources of intraspecific variation in the collective tempo and synchrony of ant societies

Grant Doering, Kirsten Sheehy, James Lichtenstein, Brian Drawert, Linda Petzold & Jonathan Pruitt
Populations of independently oscillating agents can sometimes synchronize. In the context of animal societies, conspicuous synchronization of activity is known in some social insects. However, the causes of variation in synchrony within and between species have received little attention. We repeatedly assessed the short-term activity cycle of ant colonies (Temnothorax rugatulus) and monitored the movements of individual workers and queens within nests. We detected persistent differences between colonies in the waveform properties of their collective...

Data from: The importance of street trees to urban avifauna

Eric Wood & Sevan Esaian
Street trees are public resources planted in a municipality’s right-of-way and are a considerable component of urban forests throughout the world. Street trees provide numerous benefits to people. However, many metropolitan areas have a poor understanding of the value of street trees to wildlife, which presents a gap in our knowledge of conservation in urban ecosystems. Greater Los Angeles (LA) is a global city harboring one of the most diverse and extensive urban forests on...

Habitat complexity dampens selection on prey activity level

Carl Keiser, Spencer Ingley, Benjamin Toscano, Inon Scharf & Jonathan Pruitt
Conspecific prey individuals often exhibit persistent differences in behavior (i.e., animal personality) and consequently vary in their susceptibility to predation. How this form of selection varies across environmental contexts is essential to predicting ecological and evolutionary dynamics, yet remains currently unresolved. Here, we use three separate predator–prey systems (sea star–snail, wolf spider–cricket, and jumping spider–cricket) to independently examine how habitat structural complexity influences the selection that predators impose on prey behavioral types. Prior to conducting...

Kelp forests at the end of the earth: 45 years later

Alan Friedlander, Enric Ballesteros, Tom Bell, Jennifer Caselle, Claudio Campagna, Mathias Hune, Alex Munoz, Pelayo Salinas-De-Leon, Enric Sala & Paul Dayton
The kelp forests of southern South America are some of the least disturbed on the planet. The remoteness of this region has, until recently, spared it from many of the direct anthropogenic stressors that have negatively affected these ecosystems elsewhere. Re-surveys of 11 locations at the easternmost extent of Tierra del Fuego originally conducted in 1973 showed no significant differences in the densities of adult and juvenile Macrocystis pyrifera kelp or kelp holdfast diameter between...

Assessing the repeatability, robustness to disturbance, and parent‐offspring colony resemblance of collective behavior

David Fisher, James Lichtenstein, Raul Costa-Pereira, Justin Yeager & Jonathan Pruitt
Groups of animals possess phenotypes such as collective behaviour, which may determine the fitness of group members. However, the stability and robustness to perturbations of collective phenotypes in natural conditions is not established. Furthermore, whether group phenotypes are transmitted from parent to offspring groups with fidelity is required for understanding how selection on group phenotypes contributes to evolution, but parent-offspring resemblance at the group level is rarely estimated. We evaluated the repeatability, robustness to perturbation,...

Data from: Benefits and challenges of scaling up expansion of marine protected area networks in the Verde Island Passage, Central Philippines

Vera Horigue, Robert L. Pressey, Morena Mills, Jana Brotanková, Reniel Cabral & Serge Andrefouet
Locally-established marine protected areas (MPAs) have been proven to achieve local-scale fisheries and conservation objectives. However, since many of these MPAs were not designed to form ecologically-connected networks, their contributions to broader-scale goals such as complementarity and connectivity can be limited. In contrast, integrated networks of MPAs designed with systematic conservation planning are assumed to be more effective—ecologically, socially, and economically—than collections of locally-established MPAs. There is, however, little empirical evidence that clearly demonstrates the...

Data from: Regulation of reproductive processes with Dynamic Energy Budgets

Erik B. Muller, Konstadia Lika, Roger M. Nisbet, Irvin R. Schultz, Jerome Casas, Andre Gergs, Cheryl A. Murphy, Diane Nacci & Karen H. Watanabe
1. Linking organismal level processes to underlying suborganismal mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and organ level constitutes a major challenge for predictive ecological risk assessments. This challenge can be addressed with the simple bioenergetic models in the family of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB), which consist of a small number of state equations quantifying universal processes, such as feeding, maintenance, development, reproduction and growth. 2. Motivated by the need for process-based models to evaluate the impact...

Data from: Spatial patterns of self-recruitment of a coral reef fish in relation to island-scale retention mechanisms

Ricardo Beldade, Sally J. Holbrook, Russell J. Schmitt, Serge Planes & Giacomo Bernardi
Oceanographic features influence the transport and delivery of marine larvae, and physical retention mechanisms, such as eddies, can enhance self-recruitment (i.e. the return of larvae to their natal population). Knowledge of exact locations of hatching (origin) and settlement (arrival) of larvae of reef animals provides a means to compare observed patterns of self-recruitment ‘connectivity’ with those expected from water circulation patterns. Using parentage inference based on multiple sampling years in Moorea, French Polynesia, we describe...

Data from: Large-scale recovery of an endangered amphibian despite ongoing exposure to multiple stressors

Roland A. Knapp, Gary M. Fellers, Patrick M. Kleeman, David A. W. Miller, Vance T. Vredenburg, Erica Bree Rosenblum & Cheryl J. Briggs
Amphibians are one of the most threatened animal groups, with 32% of species at risk for extinction. Given this imperiled status, is the disappearance of a large fraction of the Earth’s amphibians inevitable, or are some declining species more resilient than is generally assumed? We address this question in a species that is emblematic of many declining amphibians, the endangered Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog (Rana sierrae). Based on >7,000 frog surveys conducted across Yosemite National...

Impacts of rodent eradication on seed predation and plant community biomass on a tropical atoll

Ana Miller-Ter Kuile, Devyn Orr, An Bui, Rodolfo Dirzo, Maggie Klope, Douglas McCauley, Carina Motta & Hillary Young
Invasive rodent eradications are frequently undertaken to curb island biodiversity loss. However, the breadth of rodents’ ecological impact, even after eradication, is not always fully recognized. For example, the most widespread invasive rodent, the black rat (Rattus rattus), while omnivorous, eats predominantly seeds and fruit. Yet, the effects of seed predation release after eradication on plant communities and ecological functions are not well understood, posing a gap for island restoration. We examined the role of...

Data from: Missing the people for the trees: identifying coupled natural-human system feedbacks driving the ecology of Lyme disease

Andrew J. MacDonald, Ashley E. Larsen & Andrew J. Plantinga
1. Infectious diseases are rapidly emerging and many are increasing in incidence across the globe. Processes of land-use change, notably habitat loss and fragmentation, have been widely implicated in emergence and spread of zoonoses such as Lyme disease, yet evidence remains equivocal. 2. Here we discuss and apply an innovative approach from the social sciences, instrumental variables, that seeks to tease out causality from observational data. Using this approach, we revisit the effect of forest...

Data from: Integral Projection Models for host-parasite systems with an application to amphibian chytrid fungus

Mark Q. Wilber, Kate E. Langwig, Auston Marm Kilpatrick, Hamish I. McCallum & Cheryl J. Briggs
Host–parasite models are typically constructed under either a microparasite or macroparasite paradigm. However, this has long been recognized as a false dichotomy because many infectious disease agents, including most fungal pathogens, have attributes of both microparasites and macroparasites. We illustrate how Integral Projection Models (IPMs) provide a novel modelling framework to represent both types of pathogens. We build a simple host–parasite IPM that tracks both the number of susceptible and infected hosts and the distribution...

Data from: Climate modifies response of non-native and native species richness to nutrient enrichment

Habacuc Flores-Moreno, Peter B. Reich, Eric M. Lind, Lauren L. Sullivan, Eric W. Seabloom, Laura Yahdjian, Andrew S. MacDougall, Lara G. Reichmann, Juan Alberti, Selene Báez, Jonathan D. Bakker, Marc W. Cadotte, Maria C. Caldeira, Enrique J. Chaneton, Carla M. D'Antonio, Philip A. Fay, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Oscar Iribarne, Kevin P. Kirkman, Johannes M. H. Knops, Kimberly J. La Pierre, Ramesh Laungani, Andrew D. B. Leakey … & Elizabeth T. Borer
Ecosystem eutrophication often increases domination by non-natives and causes displacement of native taxa. However, variation in environmental conditions may affect the outcome of interactions between native and non-native taxa in environments where nutrient supply is elevated. We examined the interactive effects of eutrophication, climate variability and climate average conditions on the success of native and non-native plant species using experimental nutrient manipulations replicated at 32 grassland sites on four continents. We hypothesized that effects of...

Data from: Divergence in pollen performance between Clarkia sister species with contrasting mating systems supports predictions of sexual selection

Susan J. Mazer, Brandon Thomas Hendrickson, Joseph P. Chellew, Lynn J. Kim, Jasen W. Liu, Jasper Shu, Manju V. Sharma & Susan Mazer
Animal taxa that differ in the intensity of sperm competition often differ in sperm production or swimming speed, arguably due to sexual selection on postcopulatory male traits affecting siring success. In plants, closely related self- and cross-pollinated taxa similarly differ in the opportunity for sexual selection among male gametophytes after pollination, so traits such as the proportion of pollen on the stigma that rapidly enters the style and mean pollen tube growth rate (PTGR) are...

Reductions in the dietary niche of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) from the Holocene to the Anthropocene.

Emma Elliott Smith, M. Tim Tinker, Emily Whistler, Douglas Kennett, René Vellanoweth, Diane Gifford-Gonzalez, Mark Hylkema & Seth Newsome
The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a marine mammal hunted to near extinction during the 1800s. Despite their well-known importance as a keystone species, we know little about historical sea otter ecology. Here, we characterize the ecological niche of ancient southern sea otters (E. lutris nereis) using d13C and d15N analysis of bones recovered from archaeological sites spanning ~7,000 to 350 years before present (N=112 individuals) at five regions along the coast of California. These...

Triennial migration and philopatry in the critically endangered soupfin shark (Galeorhinus galeus)

Andrew Nosal, Daniel Cartamil, Arnold Ammann, Lyall Bellquist, Noah Ben-Aderet, Kayla Blincow, Echelle Burns, Eric Chapman, Ryan Freedman, Peter Klimley, Ryan Logan, Christopher Lowe, Brice Semmens, Connor White & Philip Hastings
Globally, one-quarter of shark and ray species is threatened with extinction due to overfishing. Effective conservation and management can facilitate population recoveries; however, these efforts depend on robust data on movement patterns and stock structure, which are lacking for many threatened species, including the Critically Endangered soupfin shark (Galeorhinus galeus), a circumglobal coastal-pelagic species. Using passive acoustic telemetry, we continuously tracked 34 mature female soupfin sharks, surgically implanted with coded acoustic transmitters, for seven years...

Juan José Arreola y su estética del zigzag

Sara Poot Herrera
pp. 77-90 The work of Juan José Arreola, taken as a whole, represents a fluid and continuous coming and going between life and literature, reality and fiction. It is a back and forth trip, a zig zag between official and popular culture, literary genres, orality and writing, because Arreola is above all a thinker and a man of culture through multiple facets that accompanied him throughout his career: essayist, narrator, chronicler, biographer, philologist, teacher, actor,...

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