14 Works

Data from: Conservation planning for offsetting the impacts of development: a case study of biodiversity and renewable energy in the Mojave Desert

Jason Kreitler, Carrie A. Schloss, Oliver Soong, Lee Hannah & Frank W. Davis
Balancing society's competing needs of development and conservation requires careful consideration of tradeoffs. Renewable energy development and biodiversity conservation are often considered beneficial environmental goals. However, the direct footprint and disturbance of renewable energy can displace species' habitat and negatively impact populations and communities if sited without ecological consideration. To mitigate residual impacts, offsets have emerged as a potentially useful tool after trying to avoid, minimize, or restore affected sites. Yet where many species or...

Data from: Inclusive fitness and differential productivity across the life course determine intergenerational transfers in a small-scale human society

Paul L. Hooper, Michael Gurven, Jeffrey Winking & Hillard S. Kaplan
Transfers of resources between generations are an essential element in current models of human life-history evolution accounting for prolonged development, extended lifespan and menopause. Integrating these models with Hamilton's theory of inclusive fitness, we predict that the interaction of biological kinship with the age-schedule of resource production should be a key driver of intergenerational transfers. In the empirical case of Tsimane’ forager–horticulturalists in Bolivian Amazonia, we provide a detailed characterization of net transfers of food...

Data from: The microscopic network structure of mussel (Mytilus) adhesive plaques

Emmanouela Filippidi, Daniel G. DeMartini, Paula Malo De Molina, Eric W. Danner, Juntae Kim, Matthew E. Helgeson, J. Herbert Waite & Megan T. Valentine
Marine mussels of the genus Mytilus live in the hostile intertidal zone, attached to rocks, bio-fouled surfaces and each other via collagen-rich threads ending in adhesive pads, the plaques. Plaques adhere in salty, alkaline seawater, withstanding waves and tidal currents. Each plaque requires a force of several newtons to detach. Although the molecular composition of the plaques has been well studied, a complete understanding of supra-molecular plaque architecture and its role in maintaining adhesive strength...

Data from: Benefits and challenges of scaling up expansion of marine protected area networks in the Verde Island Passage, Central Philippines

Vera Horigue, Robert L. Pressey, Morena Mills, Jana Brotanková, Reniel Cabral & Serge Andrefouet
Locally-established marine protected areas (MPAs) have been proven to achieve local-scale fisheries and conservation objectives. However, since many of these MPAs were not designed to form ecologically-connected networks, their contributions to broader-scale goals such as complementarity and connectivity can be limited. In contrast, integrated networks of MPAs designed with systematic conservation planning are assumed to be more effective—ecologically, socially, and economically—than collections of locally-established MPAs. There is, however, little empirical evidence that clearly demonstrates the...

Data from: Simulating regimes of chemical disturbance and testing impacts in the ecosystem using a novel programmable dosing system

Mark Anthony Browne, Paul R. Brooks, Robert Clough, Andrew S. Fisher, Mariana Mayer Pinto & Tasman P. Crowe
Pollution is a global issue at the frontier between ecology, environmental science, management, engineering and policy. Legislation requires experiments to determine how much contamination an ecosystem can absorb before there are structural or functional changes. Yet, existing methods cannot realistically simulate regimes of chemical disturbance and determine impacts to assemblages in ecosystems. This is because they lack ecologically relevant species and biotic interactions, are logistically difficult to set-up, and lack environmentally relevant regimes of chemical...

Data from: Sexual selection has minimal impact on effective population sizes in species with high rates of random offspring mortality: an empirical demonstration using fitness distributions

Alison Pischedda, Urban Friberg, Andrew D. Stewart, Paige M. Miller & William R. Rice
The effective population size (Ne) is a fundamental parameter in population genetics that influences the rate of loss of genetic diversity. Sexual selection has the potential to reduce Ne by causing the sex-specific distributions of individuals that successfully reproduce to diverge. To empirically estimate the effect of sexual selection on Ne, we obtained fitness distributions for males and females from an outbred, laboratory-adapted population of Drosophila melanogaster. We observed strong sexual selection in this population...

Data from: Systematics of organic-walled microfossils from the ca. 780–740 Ma Chuar Group, Grand Canyon, Arizona

Susannah M. Porter & Leigh Anne Riedman
he ca. 780–740 Ma Chuar Group, Grand Canyon, Arizona, provides an exceptional record of life during the diversification of crown-group eukaryotes, just prior to the first Cryogenian glaciation. We document in detail the assemblage of organic-walled microfossils preserved in fine-grained siliciclastics throughout the unit. In contrast with earlier studies, we primarily used SEM to document fossil morphologies, augmented by transmitted light microscopy, FIB-SEM, and TEM. This resulted in the discovery of new species and the...

Data from: Marine biodiversity in Juan Fernández and Desventuradas Islands, Chile: global endemism hotspots

Alan M. Friedlander, Enric Ballesteros, Jennifer E. Caselle, Carlos F. Gaymer, Alvaro T. Palma, Ignacio Petit, Eduardo Varas, Alex Muñoz Wilson & Enric Sala
The Juan Fernández and Desventuradas islands are among the few oceanic islands belonging to Chile. They possess a unique mix of tropical, subtropical, and temperate marine species, and although close to continental South America, elements of the biota have greater affinities with the central and south Pacific owing to the Humboldt Current, which creates a strong biogeographic barrier between these islands and the continent. The Juan Fernández Archipelago has ~ 700 people, with the major...

Data from: Large wildlife removal drives immune defense increases in rodents

Hillary S. Young, Rodolfo Dirzo, Kristofer M. Helgen, Douglas J. McCauley, Charles L. Nunn, Paul Snyder, Kari E. Veblen, Serena Zhao & Vanessa O. Ezenwa
Anthropogenic disturbances involving land use change, climate disruption, pollution, and invasive species have been shown to impact immune function of wild animals. These immune changes have direct impacts on the fitness of impacted animals and, also, potentially indirect effects on other species and on ecological processes, notably involving the spread of infectious disease. Here, we investigate whether the selective loss of large wildlife can also drive changes in immune function of other consumer species. Using...

Data from: Characterizing driver-response relationships in marine pelagic ecosystems for improved ocean management

Mary E. Hunsicker, Carrie V. Kappel, Kimberly A. Selkoe, Benjamin S. Halpern, Courtney Scarborough, Lindley Mease & Alisan Amrhein
Scientists and resources managers often use methods and tools that assume ecosystem components respond linearly to environmental drivers and human stressor. However, a growing body of literature demonstrates that many relationships are non-linear, where small changes in a driver prompt a disproportionately large ecological response. Here we aim to provide a comprehensive assessment of the relationships between drivers and ecosystem components to identify where and when non-linearities are likely to occur. We focus our analyses...

Data from: A mid-Oligocene (Whitneyan) rhinocerotid from northeastern California

Jen A. Bright, Bruce H. Tiffney & André R. Wyss
Rhinoceroses were important in North American mammal faunas from the late middle Eocene to the Miocene, but the group’s poor sampling outside the High Plains and eastern Rocky Mountain regions during their early evolution significantly hinders understanding of their biogeography. This limited geographic sampling is particularly true of early–middle Oligocene time, with the vast majority of Whitneyan localities occurring in the White River Badlands of South Dakota. Thus, any rhinocerotid from outside the High Plains...

Data from: The Centennial Trends Greater Horn of Africa precipitation dataset

Chris C. Funk, Sharon E. Nicholson, Martin Landsfeld, Douglas Klotter, Pete Peterson & Laura Harrison
East Africa is a drought prone, food and water insecure region with a highly variable climate. This complexity makes rainfall estimation challenging, and this challenge is compounded by low rain gauge densities and inhomogeneous monitoring networks. The dearth of observations is particularly problematic over the past decade, since the number of records in globally accessible archives has fallen precipitously. This lack of data coincides with an increasing scientific and humanitarian need to place recent seasonal...

Data from: DNA extraction method affects the detection of a fungal pathogen in formalin-fixed specimens using qPCR

Andrea J. Adams, John P. LaBonte, Morgan L. Ball, Kathryn L. Richards-Hrdlicka, Mary H. Toothman & Cheryl J. Briggs
Museum collections provide indispensable repositories for obtaining information about the historical presence of disease in wildlife populations. The pathogenic amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has played a significant role in global amphibian declines, and examining preserved specimens for Bd can improve our understanding of its emergence and spread. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) enables Bd detection with minimal disturbance to amphibian skin and is significantly more sensitive to detecting Bd than histology; therefore, developing effective qPCR...

Data from: Seascape drivers of Macrocystis pyrifera population genetic structure in the northeast Pacific

Mattias L. Johansson, Filipe Alberto, Daniel C. Reed, Peter T. Raimondi, Nelson C. Coelho, Mary A. Young, Patrick T. Drake, Christopher A. Edwards, Kyle Cavanaugh, Jorge Assis, Lydia B. Ladah, Tom W. Bell, James A. Coyer, David A. Siegel & Ester A. Serrão
At small spatial and temporal scales, genetic differentiation is largely controlled by constraints on gene flow, while genetic diversity across a species' distribution is shaped on longer temporal and spatial scales. We assess the hypothesis that oceanographic transport and other seascape features explain different scales of genetic structure of giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera. We followed a hierarchical approach to perform a microsatellite-based analysis of genetic differentiation in Macrocystis across its distribution in the northeast Pacific....

Registration Year

  • 2015
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    14
  • Stanford University
    2
  • University of California System
    2
  • United States Geological Survey
    2
  • Plymouth University
    1
  • Utah State University
    1
  • Duke University
    1
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1