26 Works

Distance decay relationships in foliar fungal endophytes are driven by rare taxa

Ryoko Oono, Emilie Lefevre & Anna Rasmussen
Foliar fungal endophytes represent a diverse and species-rich plant microbiome. Their biogeography provides essential clues to their cryptic relationship with hosts and the environment in which they disperse. We present species composition, diversity, and dispersal patterns of endophytic fungi associated with needles of Pinus taeda trees across regional scales in the absence of strong environmental gradients as well as within individual trees. An empirical designation of rare and abundant taxa enlightens us on the structure...

A confidence interval analysis of sampling effort, sequencing depth, and taxonomic resolution of fungal community ecology in the era of high-throughput sequencing.

Ryoko Oono
High-throughput sequencing technology has helped microbial community ecologists explore ecological and evolutionary patterns at unprecedented scales. The benefits of a large sample size still typically outweigh that of greater sequencing depths per sample for accurate estimations of ecological inferences. However, excluding or not sequencing rare taxa may mislead the answers to the questions ‘how and why are communities different?’ This study evaluates the confidence intervals of ecological inferences from high-throughput sequencing data of foliar fungal...

Data from: Prozac in the water: chronic fluoxetine exposure and predation risk interact to shape behaviors in an estuarine crab

Joseph R. Peters, Elise F. Granek, Catherine E. De Rivera & Matthew Rollins
Predators exert considerable top-down pressure on ecosystems by directly consuming prey or indirectly influencing their foraging behaviors and habitat use. Prey is, therefore, forced to balance predation risk with resource reward. A growing list of anthropogenic stressors such as rising temperatures and ocean acidification has been shown to influence prey risk behaviors and subsequently alter important ecosystem processes. Yet, limited attention has been paid to the effects of chronic pharmaceutical exposure on risk behavior or...

Data from: Fear of feces? Trade-offs between disease risk and foraging drive animal activity around raccoon latrines

Sara B. Weinstein, Chad W. Moura, Jon Francis Mendez & Kevin D. Lafferty
Fear of predation alters prey behavior, which can indirectly alter entire landscapes. A parasite-induced ecology of fear might also exist if animals avoid parasite-contaminated resources when infection costs outweigh foraging benefits. To investigate whether animals avoid parasite contaminated sites, and if such avoidance balances disease costs and foraging gains, we monitored animal behavior at raccoon latrines — sites that concentrate both seeds and pathogenic parasite eggs. Using wildlife cameras, we documented over 40 potentially susceptible...

Data from: Limited trophic partitioning among sympatric delphinids off a tropical oceanic atoll

Hillary Young, Katherine Nigro, Douglas J. McCauley, Lisa T. Ballance, Erin M. Oleson & Simone Baumann-Pickering
Understanding trophic relationships among marine predators in remote environments is challenging, but it is critical to understand community structure and dynamics. In this study, we used stable isotope analysis of skin biopsies to compare the isotopic, and thus, trophic niches of three sympatric delphinids in the waters surrounding Palmyra Atoll, in the Central Tropical Pacific: the melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra), Gray’s spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris longirostris), and the common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). δ15N values...

Data from: Transitions between phases of genomic differentiation during stick-insect speciation

Rüdiger Riesch, Moritz Muschick, Dorothea Lindtke, Romain Villoutreix, Aaron A. Comeault, Timothy E. Farkas, Kay Lucek, Elizabeth Hellen, Víctor Soria-Carrasco, Stuart R. Dennis, Clarissa F. De Carvalho, Rebecca J. Safran, Cristina P. Sandoval, Jeff Feder, Regine Gries, Bernard J. Crespi, Gerhard Gries, Zach Gompert & Patrik Nosil
Speciation can involve a transition from a few genetic loci that are resistant to gene flow to genome-wide differentiation. However, only limited data exist concerning this transition and the factors promoting it. Here, we study phases of speciation using data from >100 populations of 11 species of Timema stick insects. Consistent with early phases of genic speciation, adaptive colour-pattern loci reside in localized genetic regions of accentuated differentiation between populations experiencing gene flow. Transitions to...

Data from: Protection of large predators in a marine reserve alters size-dependent prey mortality

Rebecca L. Selden, Steven D. Gaines, Scott L. Hamilton & Robert R. Warner
Where predator–prey interactions are size-dependent, reductions in predator size owing to fishing has the potential to disrupt the ecological role of top predators in marine ecosystems. In southern California kelp forests, we investigated the size-dependence of the interaction between herbivorous sea urchins and one of their predators, California sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher). Empirical tests examined how differences in predator size structure between reserve and fished areas affected size-specific urchin mortality. Sites inside marine reserves had greater...

Data from: Resistance, tolerance and environmental transmission dynamics determine host extinction risk in a load-dependent amphibian disease

Mark Q. Wilber, Roland A. Knapp, Mary Toothman & Cheryl J. Briggs
While disease-induced extinction is generally considered rare, a number of recently emerging infectious diseases with load-dependent pathology have led to extinction in wildlife populations. Transmission is a critical factor affecting disease-induced extinction, but the relative importance of transmission compared to load-dependent host resistance and tolerance is currently unknown. Using a combination of models and experiments on an amphibian species suffering extirpations from the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), we show that while transmission from an...

Data from: Biological and statistical processes jointly drive population aggregation: using host–parasite interactions to understand Taylor's power law

Pieter T. J. Johnson & Mark Q. Wilber
The macroecological pattern known as Taylor's power law (TPL) represents the pervasive tendency of the variance in population density to increase as a power function of the mean. Despite empirical illustrations in systems ranging from viruses to vertebrates, the biological significance of this relationship continues to be debated. Here we combined collection of a unique dataset involving 11 987 amphibian hosts and 332 684 trematode parasites with experimental measurements of core epidemiological outcomes to explicitly...

Data from: Additive effects of pCO2 and temperature on respiration rates of the Antarctic pteropod Limacina helicina antarctica

Umihiko Hoshijima, Juliet M. Wong & Gretchen E. Hofmann
The Antarctic pteropod, Limacina helicina antarctica, is a dominant member of the zooplankton in the Ross Sea and supports the vast diversity of marine megafauna that designates this region as an internationally protected area. Here, we observed the response of respiration rate to abiotic stressors associated with global change – environmentally relevant temperature (-0.8˚C, 4˚C) and pH treatments reflecting current-day and future modeled extremes. Sampling repeatedly over a 14-day period in laboratory experiments and using...

Data from: Phenological responsiveness to climate differs among four species of Quercus in North America

Katharine L. Gerst, Natalie L. Rossington & Susan J. Mazer
1.The timing of the seasonal activity of organisms is a tractable indicator of climate change. Many studies in North America have investigated the role of temperature on the onset date of phenological transitions in temperate deciduous trees and found that the onset of leafing and flowering in numerous species has occurred earlier in recent years, apparently in response to higher temperatures in winter and spring. 2.Few studies have examined the climatic and biogeographic drivers of...

Data from: Spatial separation without territoriality in shark communities

Yannis P. Papastamatiou, Thomas W. Bodey, Alan M. Friedlander, Christopher G. Lowe, Darcy Bradley, Kevin Weng, Victoria Priestley & Jennifer E. Caselle
Spatial separation within predator communities can arise via territoriality but also from competitive interactions between and within species. However, linking competitive interactions to predator distribution patterns is difficult and theoretical models predict different habitat selection patterns dependent on habitat quality and how competition manifests itself. While models generally consider competitors to be either equal in ability, or for one phenotype to have a fixed advantage over the other, few studies consider that an animal may...

Data from: Integrating lipid storage into general representations of fish energetics

Benjamin T. Martin, Ron Heintz, Eric M. Danner & Roger M. Nisbet
Fish, even of the same species, can exhibit substantial variation in energy density (energy per unit wet weight). Most of this variation is due to differences in the amount of storage lipids. In addition to their importance as energy reserves for reproduction and for survival during unfavourable conditions, the accumulation of lipids represents a large energetic flux for many species, so figuring out how this energy flux is integrated with other major energy fluxes (growth,...

Data from: Spatio-temporal models reveal subtle changes to demersal communities following the Exxon Valdez oil spill

Andrew O. Shelton, Mary E. Hunsicker, Eric J. Ward, Blake E. Feist, Rachael Blake, Colette L. Ward, Benjamin C. Williams, Janet T. Duffy-Anderson, Anne B. Hollowed & Alan C. Haynie
Toxic pollutants such as crude oil have direct negative effects for a wide array of marine life. While mortality from acute exposure to oil is obvious, sub-lethal consequences of exposure to petroleum derivatives for growth and reproduction are less evident and sub-lethal effects in fish populations are obscured by natural environmental variation, fishing, and measurement error. We use fisheries independent surveys in the Gulf of Alaska to examine the consequences of the 1989 Exxon Valdez...

Data from: Epidemic and endemic pathogen dynamics correspond to distinct host population microbiomes at a landscape scale

Andrea J. Jani, Roland A. Knapp & Cheryl J. Briggs
Infectious diseases have serious impacts on human and wildlife populations, but the effects of a disease can vary, even among individuals or populations of the same host species. Identifying the reasons for this variation is key to understanding disease dynamics and mitigating infectious disease impacts, but disentangling cause and correlation during natural outbreaks is extremely challenging. This study aims to understand associations between symbiotic bacterial communities and an infectious disease, and examines multiple host populations...

Data from: Single cell genomics of uncultured marine alveolates shows paraphyly of basal dinoflagellates

Jürgen F. H. Strassert, Anna Karnkowska, Elisabeth Hehenberger, Javier Del Campo, Martin Kolisko, Noriko Okamoto, Fabien Burki, Jan Janouškovec, Camille Poirier, Guy Leonard, Steven J. Hallam, Thomas A. Richards, Alexandra Z. Worden, Alyson E. Santoro & Patrick J. Keeling
Marine alveolates (MALVs) are diverse and widespread early-branching dinoflagellates, but most knowledge of the group comes from a few cultured species that are generally not abundant in natural samples, or from diversity analyses of PCR-based environmental SSU rRNA gene sequences. To more broadly examine MALV genomes, we generated single cell genome sequences from seven individually isolated cells. Genes expected of heterotrophic eukaryotes were found, with interesting exceptions like presence of proteorhodopsin and vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase. Phylogenetic...

Data from: Paradoxical escape responses by narwhals (Monodon monoceros)

Terrie M. Williams, Susanna B. Blackwell, Beau Richter, Mikkel-Holger S. Sinding & Mads Peter Heide-Jørgensen
Until recent declines in Arctic sea ice levels, narwhals (Monodon monoceros) have lived in relative isolation from human perturbation and sustained predation pressures. The resulting naïvety has made this cryptic, deep-diving cetacean highly susceptible to disturbance, although quantifiable effects have been lacking. We deployed a submersible, animal-borne electrocardiograph-accelerometer-depth recorder to monitor physiological and behavioral responses of East Greenland narwhals after release from net entanglement and stranding. Escaping narwhals displayed a paradoxical cardiovascular down-regulation (extreme bradycardia...

Data from: Relationships between forest cover and fish diversity in the Amazon River floodplain

Caroline C. Arantes, Kirk O. Winemiller, Miguel Petrere, Leandro Castello, Laura L. Hess, Carlos E.C. Freitas & Carlos E. C. Freitas
1.Habitat degradation leads to biodiversity loss and concomitant changes in ecosystem processes. Tropical river floodplains are highly threatened by land cover changes and support high biodiversity and important ecosystems services, but the extent to which changes in floodplain land cover affect fish biodiversity remains unknown. 2.We combined fish and environmental data collected in situ and satellite-mapped landscape features to evaluate how fish species with different ecological strategies and assemblage structures respond to deforestation in floodplains...

Data from: Male mate choice via cuticular hydrocarbon pheromones drives reproductive isolation between Drosophila species

Michael P. Shahandeh, Alison Pischedda & Thomas L. Turner
Mate discrimination is a key mechanism restricting gene flow between species. While studied extensively with respect to female mate choice, mechanisms of male mate choice between species are far less studied. Thus, we have little knowledge of the relative frequency, importance, or overall contribution of male mate discrimination to reproductive isolation. In the present study, we estimated the relative contributions of male and female choice to reproductive isolation between Drosophila simulans and D. sechellia, and...

Data from: Group elicitations yield more consistent, yet more uncertain experts in understanding risks to ecosystem services in New Zealand bays

Gerald G. Singh, Jim Sinner, Joanne Ellis, Milind Kandlikar, Benjamin S. Halpern, Terre Satterfield & Kai Chan
The elicitation of expert judgment is an important tool for assessment of risks and impacts in environmental management contexts, and especially important as decision-makers face novel challenges where prior empirical research is lacking or insufficient. Evidence-driven elicitation approaches typically involve techniques to derive more accurate probability distributions under fairly specific contexts. Experts are, however, prone to overconfidence in their judgements. Group elicitations with diverse experts can reduce expert overconfidence by allowing cross-examination and reassessment of...

Data from: The index case is not enough: variation among individuals, groups, and social networks modify bacterial transmission dynamics

Carl N. Keiser, Noa Pinter-Wollman, Michael J. Ziemba, Krishna S. Kothamasu & Jonathan N. Pruitt
1.The traits of the index case of an infectious disease outbreak, and the circumstances for their etiology, potentially influence the trajectory of transmission dynamics. However, these dynamics likely also depend on the traits of the individuals with whom the index case interacts. 2.We used the social spider Stegodyphus dumicola to test how the traits of the index case, group phenotypic composition, and group size interact to facilitate the transmission of a GFP-labeled cuticular bacterium. We...

Data from: The role of livestock intensification and landscape structure in maintaining tropical biodiversity

Fredy Alvarado, Federico Escobar, David R. Williams, Víctor Arroyo-Rodríguez & Fernando Escobar-Hernández
1. As tropical cattle ranching continues to expand, successful conservation will require an improved understanding of the relative impacts of different livestock systems and landscape structure on biodiversity. Here, we provide the first empirical and multi-scale assessment of the relative effects of livestock intensification and landscape structure on biodiversity in the threatened tropical dry forests of Mesoamerica. 2. We used a dataset of dung beetles (169 372 individuals from 33 species) collected from twenty 1-km2...

Data from: Molecular clocks indicate turnover and diversification of modern coleoid cephalopods during the Mesozoic Marine Revolution

Alastair R. Tanner, Dirk Fuchs, Inger E. Winkelmann, Thomas P. Gilbert, M. Sabrina Pankey, Angela M. Ribeiro, Kevin M. Kocot, Kenneth M. Halanych, Todd H. Oakley, Rute R. Da Fonseca, Davide Pisani, Jakob Vinther & M. Thomas P. Gilbert
Coleoid cephalopod molluscs comprise squid, cuttlefish and octopuses, and represent nearly the entire diversity of modern cephalopods. Sophisticated adaptations such as the use of colour for camouflage and communication, jet propulsion and the ink sac highlight the unique nature of the group. Despite these striking adaptations, there are clear parallels in ecology between coleoids and bony fishes. The coleoid fossil record is limited, however, hindering confident analysis of the tempo and pattern of their evolution....

Data from: Size, age, and habitat determine effectiveness of Palau's Marine Protected Areas

Alan M. Friedlander, Yimnang Golbuu, Enric Ballesteros, Jennifer E. Caselle, Marine Gouezo, Dawnette Olsudong & Enric Sala
Palau has a rich heritage of conservation that has evolved from the traditional moratoria on fishing, or "bul", to more western Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), while still retaining elements of customary management and tenure. In 2003, the Palau Protected Areas Network (PAN) was created to conserve Palau's unique biodiversity and culture, and is the country's mechanism for achieving the goals of the Micronesia Challenge (MC), an initiative to conserve ?30% of near-shore marine resources within...

Data from: Bias associated with the detectability of the coral-eating pest crown-of-thorns seastar and implications for reef management

Mohsen Kayal, Pauline Bosserelle & Mehdi Adjeroud
Outbreaks of the predator crown-of-thorns seastar (COTS) Acanthaster planci cause widespread coral mortality across the Indo-Pacific. Like many marine invertebrates, COTS is a nocturnal species whose cryptic behaviour during the day can affect its detectability, particularly in structurally complex reef habitats that provide many refuges for benthic creatures. We performed extensive day and night surveys of COTS populations in coral reef habitats showing differing levels of structural complexity and COTS abundance. We tested whether estimations...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    26

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    25
  • Text
    1

Affiliations

  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    26
  • University of California System
    2
  • Alaska Fisheries Science Center
    2
  • University of Hawaii at Manoa
    2
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    2
  • University of British Columbia
    2
  • University of Exeter
    2
  • National Geographic Society
    2
  • Rice University
    1
  • Utah State University
    1