12 Works

Data from: A combinatorial analysis using observational data identifies species that govern ecosystem functioning

Benoît Jaillard, Philippe Deleporte, Michel Loreau & Cyrille Violle
Understanding the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning has so far resulted from two main approaches: the analysis of species' functional traits, and the analysis of species interaction networks. Here we propose a third approach, based on the association between combinations of species or of functional groups, which we term assembly motifs, and observed ecosystem functioning. Each assembly motif describes a biotic environment in which species interactions have particular effects on a given ecosystem function....

Data from: The mechanics of predator-prey interactions: first principles of physics predict predator-prey size ratios

Sebastien Portalier, Gregor Fussmann, Michel Loreau & Mehdi Cherif
1. Robust predictions of predator-prey interactions are fundamental for the understanding of food webs, their structure, dynamics, resistance to species loss, response to invasions and ecosystem function. Most current food web models measure parameters at the food web level to predict patterns at the same level. Thus, they are sensitive to the quality of the data, and may be ineffective in predicting non-observed interactions and disturbed food webs. There is a need for mechanistic models...

Data from: Dry-season decline in tree sapflux is correlated with leaf turgor loss point in a tropical rainforest

Isabelle Maréchaux, Damien Bonal, Megan K. Bartlett, Benoît Burban, Sabrina Coste, Elodie A. Courtois, Maguy Dulormne, Jean-Yves Goret, Eléonore Mira, Ariane Mirabel, Lawren Sack, Clément Stahl & Jerome Chave
1. Water availability is a key determinant of forest ecosystem function and tree species distributions. While droughts are increasing in frequency in many ecosystems, including in the tropics, plant responses to water supply vary with species and drought intensity, and are therefore difficult to model. Based on physiological first principles, we hypothesized that trees with a lower turgor loss point (πtlp), i.e., a more negative leaf water potential at wilting, would maintain water transport for...

Data from: Social conformity and propagation of information in collective u-turns of fish schools

Valentin Lecheval, Li Jiang, Pierre Tichit, Clément Sire, Charlotte K. Hemelrijk & Guy Theraulaz
Moving animal groups such as schools of fish or flocks of birds often undergo sudden collective changes of their travelling direction as a consequence of stochastic fluctuations in heading of the individuals. However, the mechanisms by which these behavioural fluctuations arise at the individual level and propagate within a group are still unclear. In the present study, we combine an experimental and theoretical approach to investigate spontaneous collective U-turns in groups of rummy-nose tetra (Hemigrammus...

Data from: Nitrogen addition does not reduce the role of spatial asynchrony in stabilizing grassland communities

Yunhai Zhang, Jinchao Feng, Michel Loreau, Nianpeng He, Xingguo Han & Lin Jiang
While nitrogen (N) amendment is known to affect the stability of ecological communities, whether this effect is scale‐dependent remains an open question. By conducting a field experiment in a temperate grassland, we found that both plant richness and temporal stability of community biomass increased with spatial scale, but N enrichment reduced richness and stability at the two scales considered. Reduced local‐scale stability under N enrichment arose from N‐induced reduction in population stability, which was partly...

Data from: Seasonality, alarm pheromone and serotonin: insights on the neurobiology of honeybee defence from winter bees

Morgane Nouvian, Nina Deisig, Judith Reinhard & Martin Giurfa
Honeybees maintain their colony throughout the cold winters, a strategy that enables them to make the most of early spring flowers. During this period, their activity is mostly limited to thermoregulation, while foraging and brood rearing are stopped. Less is known about seasonal changes to the essential task of defending the colony against intruders, which is regulated by the sting alarm pheromone. We studied the stinging responsiveness of winter bees exposed to this scent or...

Data from: Habitat choice meets thermal specialization: competition with specialists may drive suboptimal habitat preferences in generalists

Staffan Jacob, Estelle Laurent, Bart Haegeman, Romain Bertrand, Jerome G. Prunier, Delphine Legrand, Julien Cote, Alexis S. Chaine, Michel Loreau, Jean Clobert & Nicolas Schtickzelle
Limited dispersal is classically considered as a prerequisite for ecological specialization to evolve, such that generalists are expected to show greater dispersal propensity compared with specialists. However, when individuals choose habitats that maximize their performance instead of dispersing randomly, theory predicts dispersal with habitat choice to evolve in specialists, while generalists should disperse more randomly. We tested whether habitat choice is associated with thermal niche specialization using microcosms of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, a species...

Data from: Melanin-based colouration and host-parasite interactions under global change

Jessica Côte, Amandine Boniface, Simon Blanchet, Andrew Hendry, Julien Gasparini & Lisa Jacquin
The role of parasites in shaping melanin-based colour polymorphism, and the consequences of colour polymorphism for disease resistance, remain debated. Here we review recent evidence of the links between melanin-based colouration and the behavioural and immunological defences of vertebrates against their parasites. First we propose that (1) differences between colour morphs can result in variable exposure to parasites, either directly (certain colours might be more or less attractive to parasites) or indirectly (variations in behaviour...

Data from: Eradicating abundant invasive prey could cause unexpected and varied biodiversity outcomes: the importance of multi-species interactions

Miguel Lurgi, Euan G. Ritchie & Damien A. Fordham
1. Abundant and widely-distributed invasive prey can negatively affect co-occurring native species by competing for food and/or shelter, removing vegetation cover and reducing habitat complexity (changing predation risk), and by sustaining elevated abundances of invasive mesopredators. However, information regarding the community and trophic consequences of controlling invasive prey, and their temporal dynamics, remain poorly understood. 2. We used multi-species ecological network models to simulate the consequences of changing European rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus abundance in an...

Data from: Impact of local forest composition on soil fungal communities in a mixed boreal forest

Mélissande Nagati, Mélanie Roy, Sophie Manzi, Franck Richard, Annie Desrochers, Monique Gardes & Yves Bergeron
sequencesfungal ITS sequencesSoil chemical analysesSoil chemical analysessoilchar.csvfunguild resultsfunguild.csvdescription of samplescarsample.csvR codeR_code

Data from: Drivers of vegetative dormancy across herbaceous perennial plant species

Richard P. Shefferson, Tiiu Kull, Michael J. Hutchings, Marc-André Selosse, Hans Jacquemyn, Kimberly M. Kellett, Eric S. Menges, Richard B. Primack, Juha Tuomi, Kirsi Alahuhta, Sonja Hurskainen, Helen M. Alexander, Derek S. Anderson, Rein Brys, Emilia Brzosko, Slavomir Dostálik, Katharine Gregg, Zdeněk Ipser, Anne Jäkäläniemi, Jana Jersáková, W. Dean Kettle, Melissa K. McCormick, Ana Mendoza, Michael T. Miller, Asbjørn Moen … & Dennis F. Whigham
Vegetative dormancy, that is the temporary absence of aboveground growth for ≥ 1 year, is paradoxical, because plants cannot photosynthesise or flower during dormant periods. We test ecological and evolutionary hypotheses for its widespread persistence. We show that dormancy has evolved numerous times. Most species displaying dormancy exhibit life‐history costs of sprouting, and of dormancy. Short‐lived and mycoheterotrophic species have higher proportions of dormant plants than long‐lived species and species with other nutritional modes. Foliage...

Data from: The evolution of chemical defenses along invasion routes: Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coccinellidae: Coleoptera) as a case study

Alexandra Magro, Felipe Ramon-Portugal, Benoît Facon, Christine Ducamp & Jean-Louis Hemptinne
The Evolution of Increased Competitive Ability (EICA) hypothesis (Blossey & Nötzold, 1995) postulates that escaping from coevolved enemies increases invaders fitness by energy reallocation from defenses and immunity to growth and reproduction. In this context, we evaluated the evidence of evolutionary change in invasive populations of Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coccinellidae: Coleoptera). We measured egg defenses – cocktail of hydrocarbons on the egg’s surface flagging egg toxicity, and the concentration of the main alkaloid harmonine -...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Paul Sabatier University
    12
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    7
  • McGill University
    2
  • Sorbonne University
    2
  • University of Montpellier
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1
  • University of Antwerp
    1
  • University of Sussex
    1
  • Princeton University
    1