19 Works

Data from: A cost for high levels of sperm competition in rodents: increased sperm DNA fragmentation

Javier DelBarco-Trillo, Olga García-Álvarez, Ana Soler, Maximiliano Tourmente, Julian Garde & Eduardo R. S. Roldan
Sperm competition, a prevalent evolutionary process in which the spermatozoa of two or more males compete for the fertilization of the same ovum, leads to morphological and physiological adaptations, including increases in energetic metabolism that may serve to propel sperm faster but that may have negative effects on DNA integrity. Sperm DNA damage is associated with reduced rates of fertilization, embryo and foetal loss, offspring mortality, and mutations leading to genetic disease. We tested whether...

Data from: Divergent trophic responses to biogeographic and environmental gradients

Miguel G. Matias, Cátia Lúcio Pereira, Pedro Miguel Raposeiro, Vítor Gonçalves, Ana Mafalda Cruz, Ana Cristina Costa & Miguel Bastos Araújo
Following environmental changes, communities disassemble and reassemble in seemingly unpredictable ways. Whether species respond to such changes individualistically or collectively (e.g. as functional groups) is still unclear. To address this question, we used an extensive new dataset for the lake communities in the Azores' archipelago to test whether: 1) individual species respond concordantly within trophic groups; 2) trophic groups respond concordantly to biogeographic and environmental gradients. Spatial concordance in individual species distributions within trophic groups...

Data from: Joint effects of habitat, zooplankton, host stage structure and diversity on amphibian chytrid

Jessica L. Hite, Jaime Bosch, Saioa Fernández-Beaskoetxea, Daniel Medina & Spencer R. Hall
Why does the severity of parasite infection differ dramatically across habitats? This question remains challenging to answer because multiple correlated pathways drive disease. Here, we examined habitat–disease links through direct effects on parasites and indirect effects on parasite predators (zooplankton), host diversity and key life stages of hosts. We used a case study of amphibian hosts and the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, in a set of permanent and ephemeral alpine ponds. A field experiment showed...

Data from: Heritability of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis burden and its genetic correlation with development time in a population of Common toad (Bufo spinosus)

Gemma Palomar, Jaime Bosch & José Manuel Cano
Despite the important threat that emerging pathogens pose for the conservation of biodiversity as well as human health, very little is known about the adaptive potential of host species to withstand infections. We studied the quantitative genetic architecture responsible for the burden of the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in a population of common toads in conjunction with other life-history traits (i.e. body size and development rate) which may be affected by common selective pressures. We...

Data from: Patterns and biases in climate change research on amphibians and reptiles: a systematic review

Maiken Winter, Wolfgang Fiedler, Wesley M. Hochachka, Arnulf Koehncke, Shai Meiri & Ignacio De La Riva
Climate change probably has severe impacts on animal populations, but demonstrating a causal link can be difficult because of potential influences by additional factors. Assessing global impacts of climate change effects may also be hampered by narrow taxonomic and geographical research foci. We review studies on the effects of climate change on populations of amphibians and reptiles to assess climate change effects and potential biases associated with the body of work that has been conducted...

Data from: Rapid postglacial diversification and long-term stasis within the songbird genus Junco: phylogeographic and phylogenomic evidence

Guillermo Friis, Pau Aleixandre, Ricardo Rodriguez-Estrella, Adolfo G. Navarro-Sigüenza & Borja Milá
Natural systems composed of closely-related taxa that vary in the degree of phenotypic divergence and geographic isolation, provide an opportunity to investigate the rate of phenotypic diversification and the relative roles of selection and drift in driving lineage formation. The genus Junco (Aves: Emberizidae) of North America includes parapatric northern forms that are markedly divergent in plumage pattern and color, in contrast to geographically isolated southern populations in remote areas that show moderate phenotypic divergence....

Data from: Hybridization during altitudinal range shifts: nuclear introgression leads to extensive cyto-nuclear discordance in the fire salamander

Ricardo Pereira, Iñigo Martínez-Solano, David Buckley & Ricardo J. Pereira
Ecological models predict that, in the face of climate change, taxa occupying steep altitudinal gradients will shift their distributions, leading to the contraction or extinction of the high-elevation (cold-adapted) taxa. However, hybridization between eco-morphologically divergent taxa commonly occurs in nature and may lead to alternative evolutionary outcomes, such as genetic merger or gene flow at specific genes. We evaluate this hypothesis by studying patterns of divergence and gene flow across three replicate contact zones between...

Data from: Phylogeographic analysis reveals northerly refugia for the riverine amphibian Triturus dobrogicus (Caudata: Salamandridae)

Judit Vörös, Peter Mikulíček, Ágnes Major, Ernesto Recuero & Jan W. Arntzen
We investigated the recent evolutionary history of the Danube crested newt, Triturus dobrogicus through reconstructions of: (1) the number and position of refugia at the last glacial maximum, (2) the role of major central European rivers in pattern of post-glacial dispersal, and (3) the present-day distribution pattern. We analysed sequences of mitochondrial DNA (ND2, 1065 bp) and six microsatellite loci in 363 T. dobrogicus individuals from 58 populations covering the range of the species. Our...

Data from: The oxidative cost of reproduction depends on early development oxidative stress and sex in a bird species

Ana Angela Romero Haro, Gabriele Sorci, Carlos Alonso-Alvarez, G. Sorci & A. A. Romero-Haro
In the early 2000’s, a new component of the cost of reproduction was proposed: oxidative stress. Since then the oxidative cost of reproduction hypothesis has, however, received mixed support. Different arguments have been provided to explain this. Among them, the lack of a life history perspective on most experimental tests was suggested. We manipulated the levels of a key intracellular antioxidant (glutathione) in captive zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) during a short period of early life...

Data from: Climate forcing of an emerging pathogenic fungus across a montane multi-host community

Frances C. Clare, Julia B. Halder, Olivia Daniel, Jon Bielby, Mikhail A. Semenov, Thibaut Jombart, Adeline Loyau, Dirk S. Schmeller, Andrew A. Cunningham, Marcus Rowcliffe, Trenton W.J. Garner, Jaime Bosch & Matthew C. Fisher
Changes in the timings of seasonality as a result of anthropogenic climate change are predicted to occur over the coming decades. While this is expected to have widespread impacts on the dynamics of infectious disease through environmental forcing, empirical data are lacking. Here, we investigated whether seasonality, specifically the timing of spring ice-thaw, affected susceptibility to infection by the emerging pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) across a montane community of amphibians that are suffering declines...

Data from: The strength of the association between heterozygosity and probability of interannual local recruitment increases with environmental harshness in blue tits

Esperanza S. Ferrer, Vicente García-Navas, Juan José Sanz & Joaquín Ortego
The extent of inbreeding depression and the magnitude of heterozygosity–fitness correlations (HFC) have been suggested to depend on the environmental context in which they are assayed, but little evidence is available for wild populations. We combine extensive molecular and capture–mark–recapture data from a blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) population to (1) analyze the relationship between heterozygosity and probability of interannual adult local recruitment and (2) test whether environmental stress imposed by physiologically suboptimal temperatures and rainfall...

Data from: Sexual and natural selection in the evolution of extended phenotypes: the use of green nesting material in starlings

Juan G. Rubalcaba, Vicente Polo, Rafael Maia, Dustin R. Rubenstein, José P. Veiga, J. P. Veiga, R. Maia, D. R. Rubenstein, J. G. Rubalcaba & V. Polo
Although sexual selection is typically considered the predominant force driving the evolution of ritualized sexual behaviors, natural selection may also play an important and often underappreciated role. The use of green aromatic plants among nesting birds has been interpreted as a component of extended phenotype that evolved either via natural selection due to potential sanitary functions, or via sexual selection as a signal of male attractiveness. Here we compared both hypotheses using comparative methods in...

Data from: Environmental constraints and call evolution in torrent dwelling frogs

Sandra Goutte, Alain Dubois, Samuel David Howard, Rafael Marquez, Jodi J. Rowley, J. Maximilian Dehling, Philippe Grandcolas, Xiong Rongchuan, Frédéric Legendre, Samuel D. Howard & Jodi J. L. Rowley
While acoustic signals are important for communication in many taxa, signal propagation is affected by environmental properties. Strong environmental constraints should drive call evolution, favoring signals with greater transmission distance and content integrity in a given calling habitat. Yet, few empirical studies have verified this prediction, possibly due to a shortcoming in habitat characterization, which is often too broad. Here we assess the potential impact of environmental constraints on the evolution of advertisement call in...

Data from: Migratory connectivity and effects of winter temperatures on migratory behaviour of the European robin Erithacus rubecula: a continent-wide analysis

Roberto Ambrosini, José Cuervo, Chris Du Feu, Wolfgang Fiedler, Musitelli Federica, Diego Rubolini, Beatrice Sicurella, Fernando Spina, Nicola Saino, Anders Møller & Federica Musitelli
1. Many partially migratory species show phenotypically divergent populations in terms of migratory behaviour, with climate hypothesized to be a major driver of such variability through its differential effects on sedentary and migratory individuals. 2. Based on long-term (1947–2011) bird ringing data, we analysed phenotypic differentiation of migratory behaviour among populations of the European robin Erithacus rubecula across Europe. 3. We showed that clusters of populations sharing breeding and wintering ranges varied from partial (British...

Data from: The role of selection and historical factors in driving population differentiation along an elevational gradient in an island bird

Joris A. M. Bertrand, Boris Delahaie, Yann X. C. Bourgeois, Thomas Duval, Ricardo García-Jiménez, Josselin Cornuault, Benoit Pujol, Christophe Thébaud & Borja Mila
Adaptation to local environmental conditions and the range dynamics of populations can influence evolutionary divergence along environmental gradients. Thus, it is important to investigate patterns of both phenotypic and genetic variation among populations to reveal the respective roles of these two types of factors in driving population differentiation. Here, we test for evidence of phenotypic and genetic structure across populations of a passerine bird (Zosterops borbonicus) distributed along a steep elevational gradient on the island...

Data from: Microhabitat selection in the common lizard: implications of biotic interactions, age, sex, local processes, and model transferability among populations

Miguel Peñalver-Alcázar, Pedro Aragón, Merel C. Breedveld & Patrick S. Fitze
Modeling species' habitat requirements are crucial to assess impacts of global change, for conservation efforts and to test mechanisms driving species presence. While the influence of abiotic factors has been widely examined, the importance of biotic factors and biotic interactions, and the potential implications of local processes are not well understood. Testing their importance requires additional knowledge and analyses at local habitat scale. Here, we recorded the locations of species presence at the microhabitat scale...

Data from: Predicting forest management effects on oak–rodent mutualisms

Teresa Morán-López, Thorsten Wiegand, Juan Manuel Morales, Fernando Valladares & Mario Díaz
Wood mice Apodemus sylvaticus are the main dispersers of acorns in highly managed Mediterranean holm-oak woodlands. Mice mobilize and cache acorns to store them for winter consumption. They carry acorns away from potential competitors, face predation risks during mobilization, and cache acorns in areas where pilfering risks are low. However, mice can act either as net predators or as moderately efficient dispersers, depending on the way landscape management affects intraspecific competition for acorns and shelter...

Data from: Fungal disease incidence along tree diversity gradients depends on latitude in European forests

Diem Nguyen, Bastien Castagneyrol, Helge Bruelheide, Filippo Bussotti, Virginie Guyot, Hervé Jactel, Bogdan Jaroszewicz, Fernando Valladares, Jan Stenlid & Johanna Boberg
European forests host a diversity of tree species that are increasingly threatened by fungal pathogens, which may have cascading consequences for forest ecosystems and their functioning. Previous experimental studies suggest that foliar and root pathogen abundance and disease severity decrease with increasing tree species diversity, but evidences from natural forests are rare. Here, we tested whether foliar fungal disease incidence was negatively affected by tree species diversity in different forest types across Europe. We measured...

Data from: MHC-I provides both quantitative resistance and susceptibility to blood parasites in blue tits in the wild

Juan Rivero-De Aguilar, Helena Westerdahl, Josue Martínez-De La Puente, Gustavo Tomas, Javier Martínez, Santiago Merino & H. Westerdahl
Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are central for the adaptive immune response against parasites. Here, we investigated potential associations among MHC-I alleles and blood parasite infections in a natural breeding population of a passerine bird, the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus, in central Spain. We screened both infection status (presence/absence of infection) and infection intensity to the pathogenic blood parasites Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon. Three MHC-I alleles (UA104, UA108 and UA117) were associated with higher or lower...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    19

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    19

Affiliations

  • Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales
    19
  • Institute for Game and Wildlife Research
    3
  • Spanish National Research Council
    3
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • University of Copenhagen
    2
  • Imperial College London
    2
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Oviedo
    1