10 Works

Data from: Functional anatomy of the cervical region in the late Miocene amphicyonid Magericyon anceps (Carnivora, Amphicyonidae): implications for its feeding behaviour

Gema Siliceo, Manuel J. Salesa, Mauricio Antón, Stéphane Peigné & Jorge Morales
We describe the skull and neck morphology of the late Miocene amphicyonid Magericyon anceps, focusing on aspects related to functional anatomy. This species, recorded only from the Vallesian sites of Batallones-1 and Batallones-3 (Madrid, Spain), is the last known amphicyonid in the fossil record of Western Europe, with the Batallones populations being one of the best-known of the family. The morphology of its skull and cervical vertebrae allows us to infer aspects of its associated...

Data from: Nest decoration as social signals by males and females: greenery and feathers in starling colonies

Juan G. Rubalcaba, Daniel Fuentes, José P. Veiga & Vicente Polo
The expression of elaborated displays provides reliable information to conspecifics about the quality of the signaler. Competition for breeding resources or mates is predicted to affect the expression of signals in both males and females; however, the literature has been typically focused on male behaviors. The spotless starling is an interesting example where both sexes decorate the nest to signal their condition and social status: males add green plants at the beginning of the breeding...

Data from: Extreme genetic structure in a social bird species despite high dispersal capacity

Francisco Morinha, José A. Dávila, Bastos Estela, João A. Cabral, Óscar Frías, José L. González, Paulo Travassos, Diogo Carvalho, Borja Milá & Guillermo Blanco
Social barriers have been shown to reduce gene flow and contribute to genetic structure among populations in species with high cognitive capacity and complex societies, such as cetaceans, apes and humans. In birds, high dispersal capacity is thought to prevent population divergence unless major geographic or habitat barriers induce isolation patterns by dispersal, colonization or adaptation limitation. We report that Iberian populations of the red-billed chough, a social, gregarious corvid with high dispersal capacity, show...

Data from: Comparative landscape genetics of pond-breeding amphibians in Mediterranean temporal wetlands: the positive role of structural heterogeneity in promoting gene flow

Jorge Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, Joao Gonçalves, Emilio Civantos & Iñigo Martínez-Solano
Comparative landscape genetics studies can provide key information to implement cost-effective conservation measures favoring a broad set of taxa. These studies are scarce, particularly in Mediterranean areas, which include diverse but threatened biological communities. Here we focus on Mediterranean wetlands in central Iberia and perform a multi-level, comparative study of two endemic pond-breeding amphibians, a salamander (Pleurodeles waltl) and a toad (Pelobates cultripes). We genotyped 411 salamanders from 20 populations and 306 toads from 16...

Data from: Routine habitat switching alters the likelihood and persistence of infection with a pathogenic parasite

David R. Daversa, Andrea Manica, Jaime Bosch, Jolle W. Jolles & Trenton W. J. Garner
1.Animals switch habitats on a regular basis, and when habitats vary in suitability for parasitism, routine habitat switching alters the frequency of parasite exposure and may affect post-infection parasite proliferation. However, the effects of routine habitat switching on infection dynamics are not well understood. 2.We performed infection experiments, behavioural observations, and field surveillance to evaluate how routine habitat switching by adult alpine newts (Ichthyosaura alpestris) influences infection dynamics of the pathogenic parasite, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd)....

Data from: Cuckoos host range is associated positively with distribution range and negatively with evolutionary uniqueness

Federico Morelli, Yanina Benedetti, Anders P. Moller, Wei Liang & Luis M. Carrascal
1. The evolutionary distinctiveness (ED) score is a measure of phylogenetic isolation that quantifies the evolutionary uniqueness of a species. 2. Here, we compared the ED score of parasitic and non-parasitic cuckoo species worldwide, to understand whether parental care or parasitism represent the largest amount of phylogenetic uniqueness. Next, we focused only on 46 cuckoo species characterized by brood parasitism with a known number of host species, we explored the associations among ED score, number...

Data from: Aerobic power and flight capacity in birds: a phylogenetic test of the heart-size hypothesis

Roberto F. Nespolo, Cesar González-Lagos, Jaiber J. Solano-Iguaran, Magnus Elfwing, Alvaro Garitano-Zavala, Santiago Mañosa, Juan Carlos Alonso & Jordi Altamiras
Flight capacity is one of the most important innovations in animal evolution; it only evolved in insects, birds, mammals and the extinct pterodactyls. Given that powered flight represents a demanding aerobic activity, an efficient cardiovascular system is essential for the continuous delivery of oxygen to the pectoral muscles during flight. It is well known that the limiting step in the circulation is stroke volume (the volume of blood pumped from the ventricle to the body...

Data from: Carnivoran resource and habitat use in the context of a Late Miocene faunal turnover episode

Laura Domingo, M. Soledad Domingo, Paul L. Koch, Jorge Morales & M. Teresa Alberdi
We investigate resource and habitat use by apex predators through stable isotope analysis at two Spanish Late Miocene localities: Los Valles de Fuentidueña (~9.6 Ma, LVF) and Cerro de los Batallones (~9.1 Ma, BAT). The temporal window represented by LVF and BAT was crucial in the shaping of the current Iberian mammalian structure because it corresponds to the initial stages of a faunal turnover episode and regional environmental change at ~9.5–8.5 Ma (Vallesian–Turolian transition), associated...

Data from: Maternal programming of offspring antipredator behavior in a seabird

Judith Morales, Alberto Lucas & Alberto Velando
Predation risk is an important environmental factor for animal populations, expected to trigger maternal effects to prepare offspring for living in an environment with predators. Yet, evidence of adaptive anticipatory maternal effects in wild animals is still weak. Here, we explored this question in a wild colony of yellow-legged gulls, Larus michahellis. To this aim, prior to laying we exposed mothers to either mink decoys or non-predator rabbit decoys and explored the antipredator behavior of...

Data from: Reliable effective number of breeders/adult census size ratios in seasonal-breeding species: opportunity for integrative demographic inferences based on capture-mark-recapture data and multilocus genotypes

Gregorio Sánchez-Montes, Jinliang Wang, Arturo H. Ariño, José Luis Vizmanos & Íñigo Martínez-Solano
The ratio of the effective number of breeders (Nb) to the adult census size (Na), Nb/ Na, approximates the departure from the standard capacity of a population to maintain genetic diversity in one reproductive season. This information is relevant for assessing population status, understanding evolutionary processes operating at local scales and unraveling how life-history traits affect these processes. However, our knowledge on Nb/Na ratios in nature is limited because estimation of both parameters is challenging....

Registration Year

  • 2017
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Affiliations

  • Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales
    10
  • Institute for Game and Wildlife Research
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  • Zoological Society of London
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • University of Lisbon
    1
  • King Juan Carlos University
    1
  • University of Barcelona
    1
  • University of Paris-Sud
    1
  • University Austral de Chile
    1