139 Works

Expanding the Restaurant Value Chain through Digital Delivery: a Significant Disruptor in the U.S. Restaurant Industry

Mark Traynor, Andrew Moreo & Sorcha O'Neill

Cave-adapted evolution in the North American Amblyopsid fishes inferred using phylogenomics and geometric morphometrics

Pamela Hart, Matthew Niemiller, Edward Burress, Jonathan Armbruster, William Ludt & Prosanta Chakrabarty
Cave adaptation has evolved repeatedly across the Tree of Life, famously leading to pigmentation and eye degeneration and loss, yet its macroevolutionary implications remain poorly understood. We use the North American amblyopsid fishes, a family spanning a wide degree of cave adaptation, to examine the impact of cave specialization on the modes and tempo of evolution. We reconstruct evolutionary relationships using ultraconserved element loci, estimate the ancestral histories of eye-state, and examine the impact of...

Evidence of repertoire sharing and stability despite a high turnover rate in a duetting neotropical wren

Esmeralda Quirós-Guerrero, Maria Joao Janeiro, Will Cresswell & Christopher Templeton
In songbirds, the spatial pattern of song sharing among individuals is influenced by the song learning and dispersal strategies within each species. In birds where females and males sing and create joint acoustic displays (duets), the processes defining the patterns of song sharing become more complex as there might be different selection pressures shaping the behaviour of each sex. To provide further insight into the vocal development and the dispersal strategy of duetting tropical species,...

Coregonus spp. opsin amplicon sequence alignments

Katherine Eaton & Trevor Krabbenhoft
Local adaptation can drive diversification of closely related species across environmental gradients and promote convergence of distantly related taxa that experience similar conditions. We examined a potential case of adaptation to novel visual environments in a species flock (Great Lakes salmonids, genus Coregonus) using a new amplicon genotyping protocol on the Oxford Nanopore Flongle. Five visual opsin genes were sequenced for individuals of C. artedi, C. hoyi, C. kiyi, and C. zenithicus. Comparisons revealed species-specific...

Demographic responses to climate change in a threatened Arctic species

Kylee D. Dunham, Anna M. Tucker, David N. Koons, Asheber Abebe, F. Stephen Dobson & James B. Grand
The Arctic is undergoing rapid and accelerating change in response to global warming, altering biodiversity patterns and ecosystem function across the region. For Arctic endemic species, our understanding of the consequences of such change remains limited. Spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri), a large Arctic sea duck, use remote regions in the Bering Sea, Arctic Russia, and Alaska throughout the annual cycle making it difficult to conduct comprehensive surveys or demographic studies. Listed as Threatened under the...

Data from: Microsatellites reveal origin and genetic diversity of Eurasian invasions by one of the world's most notorious marine invader, Mnemiopsis leidyi (Ctenophora)

Thorsten Reusch, Sören Bolte, Maximiliane Sparwel, Anthony Moss & Jamileh Javidpour
Marine invasions take place at an increasing rate. When occurring in blooms, zooplanktivorous comb jellies of the genus Mnemiopsis are able to cause pelagic regime shifts in coastal areas, and may cause the collapse of commercially important fish populations. Using microsatellites, developed for the first time in the phylum Ctenophora, we show that Mnemiopsis leidyi has colonized Eurasia from two source regions. Our preliminary data set included 4 sites within the putative source region (US...

Data from: Population genetic data of a model symbiotic cnidarian system reveal remarkable symbiotic specificity and vectored introductions across ocean basins

Daniel J. Thornhill, Yu Xiang, Min Zhong, Scott R. Santos & D. Tye Pettay
The Aiptasia-Symbiodinium symbiosis is a promising model for experimental studies of cnidarian-dinoflagellate associations, yet relatively little is known regarding the genetic diversity of either symbiotic partner. To address this we collected Aiptasia from 17 localities throughout the world and examined the genetic diversity of both anemones and their endosymbionts. Based on newly-developed SCAR markers, Aiptasia consisted of two genetically-distinct populations, one Aiptasia lineage from Florida and a second network of Aiptasia genotypes found at other...

Data from: Sibling species of mutualistic Symbiodinium clade G from bioeroding sponges in the western Pacific and western Atlantic oceans

Blake D. Ramsby, Malcolm S. Hill, Daniel J. Thornhill, Sieuwkje F. Steenuizen, Michelle Achlatis, Allison M. Lewis, Todd C. LaJeunesse & Sieuwkje F. Steenhuizen
Dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium associate with a broad array of metazoan and protistian hosts. Symbiodinium-based symbioses involving bioeroding sponge hosts have received less attention than those involving scleractinian hosts. Certain species of common Cliona harbor high densities of an ecologically restricted group of Symbiodinium, referred to as Clade G. The relationships of these unusual Clade G Symbiodinium with Foraminifera, sponges, and black coral (Antipatharia) are rarely studied. Nonetheless, analyses of genetic evidence indicate that...

The utility of reptile blood transcriptomes in molecular ecology

Tonia S Schwartz, Damien S Waits, Dasia Y Simpson, Amanda M Sparkman & Anne M Bronikowski
Reptiles and other non-mammalian vertebrates have transcriptionally active nucleated red blood cells. If blood transcriptomes can provide quantitative data to address questions relevant to molecular ecology, this could circumvent the need to euthanize animals to assay tissues. This would allow longitudinal sampling of animals’ responses to treatments, as well as sampling of protected taxa. We developed and annotated blood transcriptomes from six reptile species. We found on average 25,000 proteins are being transcribed in the...

Data from: Island- and lake-like parallel adaptive radiations replicated in rivers

Edward D. Burress, Lubomír Piálek, Jorge R. Casciotta, Adriana Almirón, Milton Tan, Jonathan W. Armbruster & Oldřich Říčan
Parallel adaptive radiations have arisen following the colonization of islands by lizards and lakes by fishes. In these classic examples, adaptive radiation is a response to the ecological opportunities afforded by the colonization of novel ecosystems and similar adaptive landscapes that favor the evolution of similar suites of ecomorphs despite independent evolutionary histories. Here, we demonstrate that parallel adaptive radiations of cichlid fishes arose in South American rivers. Speciation-assembled assemblages of pike cichlids (Crenicichla) have...

Data from: Phylogenomics of pike cichlids (Cichlidae: Crenicichla): the rapid evolution and trophic diversification of an incipient species flock

Edward D. Burress, Fernando Alda, Alejandro Duarte, Marcelo Loureiro, Jonathan W. Armbruster & Prosanta Chakrabarty
The rapid rise of phenotypic and ecological diversity in independent lake-dwelling groups of cichlids is emblematic of the East African Great Lakes. In this study, we show that similar ecologically-based diversification has occurred in pike cichlids (Crenicichla) throughout the Uruguay River drainage of South America. We collected genomic data from nearly 500 ultraconserved element (UCEs) loci and >260,000 base pairs across 33 species, to obtain a phylogenetic hypothesis for the major species-groups and to evaluate...

Data from: Ecosystem carbon density and allocation across a chronosequence of longleaf pine forests

Lisa J. Samuelson, Thomas A. Stokes, John R. Butnor, Kurt H. Johnsen, Carlos A. Gonzalez-Benecke, Timothy A. Martin, , Pete H. Anderson, Michael R. Ramirez, John C. Lewis & Wendell P. Cropper
Forests can partially offset greenhouse gas emissions and contribute to climate change mitigation, mainly through increases in live biomass. We quantified carbon (C) density in 20 managed longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests ranging in age from five to 118 years located across the southeastern USA and estimated above and belowground C trajectories. Ecosystem C stock (all pools including soil C) and aboveground live tree C increased nonlinearly with stand age and the modeled asymptotic...

Data from: Ectoparasites and fitness of female Columbian ground squirrels

Shirley Raveh, Peter Neuhaus & F. Stephen Dobson
Parasites play an important role in the evolution of host traits via natural selection, coevolution and sexually selected ornaments used in mate choice. These evolutionary scenarios assume fitness costs for hosts. To test this assumption, we conducted an ectoparasite removal experiment in free-living Columbian ground squirrels (Urocittelus columbianus) in four populations over three years. Adult females were randomly chosen to be either experimentally treated with anti-parasite treatments (spot-on solution and flea powder, N = 61)...

Data from: Plasma dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity and measures of body composition in apparently healthy people

Heidi A. Kluess, Leslie E. Neidert, Katherine S. Wainright, Chen Zheng & Jeganathan Ramesh Babu
Aim: Based on its regulatory action on glucagon-like peptide 1, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) has increasingly been linked to Type 2 diabetes. However, there is no evidence as to how this normal modulatory enzyme leads to pathology. It is thought that DPP-IV is affected by the development of obesity, which is a common precursor to Type 2 diabetes. Little is known about the relationship between DPP-IV activity in plasma and specific body composition measures. Main...

Data from: Kin effects on energy allocation in group-living ground squirrels

Vincent A. Viblanc, Claire Saraux, Jan O. Murie & F. Stephen Dobson
The social environment has potent effects on individual phenotype and fitness in group-living species. We asked whether the presence of kin might act on energy allocation, a central aspect of life-history variation. Using a 22-year data set on reproductive and somatic allocations in Columbian ground squirrels (Urocitellus columbianus), we tested the effects of co-breeding and non-breeding kin on the fitness and energy allocation balance between reproduction and personal body condition of individual females. Greater numbers...

Data from: The effect of locomotion on the mobilization of minerals from the maternal skeleton

Wendy R. Hood & Michael Hobensack
Bone is a dynamic tissue from which minerals are deposited or withdrawn according to the body’s demand. During late pregnancy and lactation, female mammals mobilize mineral from bone to support the ossification of offspring skeleton(s). Conversely, in response to mechanical loading, minerals are deposited in bone enabling it to develop a stronger architecture. Despite their central importance to reproductive performance and skeletal integrity, the interactions between these potentially opposing forces remains poorly understood. It is...

Data from: Are thyroid hormones mediators of incubation temperature-induced phenotypes in birds?

Sarah E. DuRant, Amanda W. Carter, Robert J. Denver, Gary R. Hepp & William A. Hopkins
Incubation temperature influences a suite of traits in avian offspring. However, the mechanisms underlying expression of these phenotypes are unknown. Given the importance of thyroid hormones in orchestrating developmental processes, we hypothesized that they may act as an upstream mechanism mediating the effects of temperature on hatchling phenotypic traits such as reduced growth and thermoregulation. We found that plasma T3, but not T4 concentrations, differed among newly-hatched wood ducks (Aix sponsa) from different embryonic incubation...

Data from: Na+/K+‐ATPase gene duplications in clitellate annelids are associated with freshwater colonization

Kevin M. Horn, Bronwyn W. Williams, Christer Erséus, Kenneth M. Halanych, Scott R. Santos, Michel Des Châtelliers Creuzé & Frank E. Anderson
Major habitat transitions, such as those from marine to freshwater habitats or from aquatic to terrestrial habitats, have occurred infrequently in animal evolution and may represent a barrier to diversification. Identifying genomic events associated with these transitions can help us better understand mechanisms that allow animals to cross these barriers and diversify in new habitats. Study of the Capitella telata and Helobdella robusta genomes allows examination of one such habitat transition (marine to freshwater) in...

Data from: Geographic variation in thermal sensitivity of early life traits in a widespread reptile

Brooke L. Bodensteiner, Daniel A. Warner, John B. Iverson, Carrie L. Milne-Zelman, Timothy S. Mitchell, Jeanine M. Refsnider & Fredric J. Janzen
Taxa with large geographic distributions generally encompass diverse macroclimatic conditions, potentially requiring local adaptation and/or phenotypic plasticity to match their phenotypes to differing environments. These eco-evolutionary processes are of particular interest in organisms with traits that are directly affected by temperature, such as embryonic development in oviparous ectotherms. Here we examine the spatial distribution of fitness-related early-life phenotypes across the range of a widespread vertebrate, the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta). We quantified embryonic and hatchling...

Data from: Phylogenomic resolution of the Hemichordate and Echinoderm clade

Johanna T. Cannon, Kevin M. Kocot, Damien S. Waits, David A. Weese, Billie J. Swalla, Scott R. Santos & Kenneth M. Halanych
Ambulacraria, comprising Hemichordata and Echinodermata, is closely related to Chordata, making it integral to understanding chordate origins and polarizing chordate molecular and morphological characters. Unfortunately, relationships within Hemichordata and Echinodermata have remained unresolved, compromising our ability to extrapolate findings from the most closely related molecular and developmental models outside of Chordata (e.g., the acorn worms Saccoglossus kowalevskii and Ptychodera flava and the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). To resolve long-standing phylogenetic issues within Ambulacraria, we sequenced...

Data from: The evolution of life cycle complexity in aphids: ecological optimization, or historical constraint?

Nate B. Hardy, Daniel A. Peterson & Carol D. Von Dohlen
For decades, biologists have debated why many parasites have obligate multi-host life cycles. Here, we use comparative phylogenetic analyses of aphids to evaluate the roles of ecological optimization and historical constraint in the evolution of life cycle complexity. If life cycle complexity is adaptive, it should be evolutionarily labile, i.e., change in response to selection. We provide evidence that this is true in some aphids (aphidines), but not others (non-aphidines) – groups that differ in...

Data from: Spider phylogenomics: untangling the spider tree of life

Jason Bond, Nicole L. Garrison, Juanita Rodriguez, Ingi Agnarsson, Jonathan A. Coddington, Charles E. Griswold, Christopher A. Hamilton, Marshal Hedin, Kevin Kocot, Joel M. Ledford & Jason E. Bond
Spiders (Order Araneae) are massively abundant generalist arthropod predators that are found in nearly every ecosystem on the planet and have persisted for over 380 million years. Spiders have long served as evolutionary models for studying complex mating and web spinning behaviors, key innovation and adaptive radiation hypotheses, and have been inspiration for important theories like sexual selection by female choice. Unfortunately, past major attempts to reconstruct spider phylogeny typically employing the “usual suspect” genes...

Data from: Phylogenomic analysis of Wolbachia strains reveals patterns of genome evolution and recombination

Xu Wang, Xiaozhu Wang, Xiao Xiong, Wenqi Cao, Chao Zhang & John Werren
Wolbachia are widespread intracellular bacteria that mediate many important biological processes in arthropod species. In this study, we identified 210 conserved single-copy genes in 33 genome-sequenced Wolbachia strains in the A, B, C, D, E and F supergroups. Phylogenomic analysis with these core genes indicate that all 33 Wolbachia strains maintain the supergroup relationship classified previously based on the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) genes. Using an interclade recombination screening method, 14 inter-supergroup recombination events were...

Data from: Alternative reproductive tactics and lifetime reproductive success in a polygynandrous mammal

Adele Balmer, Bertram Zinner, Jamieson C. Gorrell, David W. Coltman, Shirley Raveh & F. Stephen Dobson
The widespread occurrence of alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) highlights the diverse ways in which sexual selection can operate within a population. We studied ARTs in Columbian ground squirrels (Urocitellus columbianus), evaluating paternity, lifetime reproductive success, and life histories. Reproductively mature male Columbian ground squirrels displayed either a territorial or satellite (non-territorial) tactic. Territorial males secured a higher proportion of copulations, were more likely to mate at earlier positions in females’ mating sequences and sired more...

Balanced polymorphisms and their divergence in a Heliconius butterfly

James Ogilvie, Steven Van Belleghem, Ryan Range, Riccardo Papa, Owen McMillan, Mathieu Chouteau & Brian Counterman
The evolution of mimicry in similarly defended prey is well described by Müllerian mimicry theory, which predicts the convergence of warning patterns in order to gain the most protection from predators. However, despite this prediction, we can find great diversity of color patterns amongst Müllerian mimics such as Heliconius butterflies in the neotropics. Furthermore, some species have evolved the ability to maintain multiple distinct warning patterns in single populations, a phenomenon known as polymorphic mimicry....

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