144 Works

Data from: Seasonal change in trophic niche of adfluvial arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) and coexisting fishes in a high-elevation lake system

Kyle A. Cutting, Wyatt F. Cross, Michelle L. Anderson & Elizabeth G. Reese
Introduction of non-native species is a leading threat to global aquatic biodiversity. Competition between native and non-native species is often influenced by changes in food availability or suitable habitat conditions. We investigated diet breadth and degree of trophic niche overlap for a fish assemblage of native and non-native species inhabiting a shallow, high elevation lake system. This assemblage includes one of the last remaining post-glacial endemic populations of adfluvial Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) in the...

Data from: Age-specific infectious period shapes dynamics of pneumonia in bighorn sheep

Raina K. Plowright, Kezia R. Manlove, Thomas E. Besser, David J. Páez, Kimberly R. Andrews, Patrick E. Matthews, Lisette P. Waits, Peter J. Hudson & E. Frances Cassirer
Superspreading, the phenomenon where a small proportion of individuals contribute disproportionately to new infections, has profound effects on disease dynamics. Superspreading can arise through variation in contacts, infectiousness or infectious periods. The latter has received little attention, yet it drives the dynamics of many diseases of critical public health, livestock health and conservation concern. Here, we present rare evidence of variation in infectious periods underlying a superspreading phenomenon in a free-ranging wildlife system. We detected...

Data from: Forest structure provides the income for reproductive success in a southern population of Canada lynx

Megan K. Kosterman, John R. Squires, Joseph D. Holbrook, Daniel H. Pletscher & Mark Hebblewhite
Understanding intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of reproductive success is central to advancing animal ecology and characterizing critical habitat. Unfortunately, much of the work examining drivers of reproductive success is biased toward particular groups of organisms (e.g., colonial birds, large herbivores, capital breeders). Long-lived mammalian carnivores that are of conservation concern, solitary, and territorial present an excellent situation to examine intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of reproductive success, yet they have received little attention. Here, we used...

Data from: Modelling misclassification in multi-species acoustic data when estimating occupancy and relative activity

Wilson J Wright, Kathryn M Irvine, Emily S Almberg & Andrea R Litt
1. Surveying wildlife communities provides data for informing conservation and management decisions that affect multiple species. Autonomous recording units (ARUs) can efficiently gather community data for a variety of taxa, but generally require software algorithms to classify each recorded call to a species. Species classification errors are possible during this process and result in both false negative and false positive detections. Available approaches for analysing ARU data do not model the species classification probabilities, meaning...

Incorporating evaporative water loss into bioenergetic models of hibernation to test for relative influence of host and pathogen traits on white-nose syndrome

Catherine Haase, Nathan Fuller, C. Reed Hranac, David Hayman, Liam McGuire, Kaleigh Norquay, Kirk Silas, Craig Willis, Raina Plowright & Sarah Olson
Hibernation consists of extended durations of torpor interrupted by periodic arousals. The ‘dehydration hypothesis’ proposes that hibernating mammals arouse to replenish water lost through evaporation during torpor. Arousals are energetically expensive, and increased arousal frequency can alter survival throughout hibernation. Yet we lack a means to assess the effect of evaporative water loss (EWL), determined by animal physiology and hibernation microclimate, on torpor bout duration and subsequent survival. White-nose syndrome (WNS), a devastating disease impacting...

Data from: Translocation with targeted vaccination is the most effective strategy to protect an island endemic bird threatened by West Nile virus

Victoria Bakker, T. Sillett, Walter Boyce, Daniel Doak, T. Winston Vickers, William Reisen, Brian Cohen, Michael Hallworth & Scott Morrison
Aim Invasive pathogens are a growing conservation challenge and often occur in tandem with rapid environmental transformation, such as climate change, drought, and habitat loss. Climate change appears to have facilitated the spread of West Nile virus (WNV), a cause of widespread avian mortality. WNV is considered the primary threat to island scrub-jays (Aphelocoma insularis), endemic to Santa Cruz Island, California. Two approaches have been proposed to safeguard island scrub-jays: (1) vaccination and (2) conservation...

Montana surveys of codling moth damage to apple fruit 2019-2020

Rachel Leisso, Chase Anderson, Tracy Novak, Katrina Mendrey, Olivia Soller & Zach Miller
Codling moth (Cydia pomonella) is the major insect pest of pome fruit (apples and pears) in Montana. This dataset reports codling moth damage to apple fruit ("strikes") in Montana orchards where site managers were not applying pesticides to control codling moth. Data was collected in August or September of 2019 and 2020. Certain sites east of the continental divide have nominally lower incidence of codling moth damage to fruit than sites west of the divide....

Habitat Selection by a Threatened Desert Amphibian

Ross Hinderer
Aim. Habitat degradation and fragmentation are major drivers of amphibian declines. The loss of environmental features that allow for movement between water sources may be particularly detrimental for amphibians in arid environments. Climate changes will increase the importance of microhabitats to amphibians. Enhancing areas to facilitate movement may be a necessary conservation strategy for many animal species that depend on wetlands, including federally-threatened Chiricahua leopard frogs (Lithobates chiricahuensis). Habitat preferences of this frog species are...

Body mass and hibernation microclimate may predict bat susceptibility to white-nose syndrome

Catherine Haase, Nathan Fuller, Yvonne Dzal, C. Reed Hranac, David Hayman, Cori Lausen, Kirk Silas, Sarah Olson & Raina Plowright
In multi-host disease systems, differences in mortality between species may reflect variation in host physiology, morphology, and behavior. In systems where the pathogen can persist in the environment, microclimate conditions, and the adaptation of the host to these conditions, may also impact mortality. White-nose syndrome is an emerging disease of hibernating bats caused by an environmentally persistent fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans. We assessed the effects of body mass, torpid metabolic rate, evaporative water loss, and hibernaculum...

Data from: Improving learner-driven teaching practices through reflective assessment

Matthew T. Regan, Scott W. H. Young & Sara Mannheimer
Objective: Reflective assessment is an effective method of teacher evaluation, serving as an approach for, assessing teaching practices, generating insights, and connecting with colleagues, ultimately supporting meaningful transformation of teaching practice. In this paper, three librarians model a reflective assessment approach in evaluating and improving their experiences implementing learner-driven teaching practices in credit-bearing courses in topics related to library and information studies. Methods: Following a model of reflective assessment, we ask ourselves how our practice...

Communicating risk in human-wildlife interactions: how stories and images move minds

Sara Guenther & Elizabeth Shanahan
Effectively communicating risk is critical to reducing conflict in human-wildlife interactions. Using a survey experiment fielded in the midst of contentious public debate over flying fox management in urban and suburban areas of Australia, we find that stories with characters (i.e., narratives) are more effective than descriptive information at mobilizing support for different forms of bat management, including legal protection, relocation, and habitat restoration. We use conditional process analysis to show that narratives, particularly with...

Disentangling interactions among mercury, immunity, and infection in a Neotropical bat community

Daniel Becker, Kelly Speer, Jennifer Korstian, Dmitriy Volokhov, Hannah Droke, Alexis Brown, Catherene Baijnauth, Ticha Padgett-Stewart, Hugh Broders, Raina Plowright, Thomas Rainwater, Brock Fenton, Nancy Simmons & Matthew Chumchal
Contaminants such as mercury are pervasive and can have immunosuppressive effects on wildlife. Impaired immunity could be important for forecasting pathogen spillover risks, as many land-use changes that generate mercury contamination also bring wildlife into close contact with humans and domestic animals. However, the interactions among contaminants, immunity, and infection are difficult to study in natural systems, and empirical tests of possible directional relationships remain rare. We capitalized on extreme mercury variation in a diverse...

Repository Analytics and Metrics Portal (RAMP) 2021 data

Jonathan Wheeler & Kenning Arlitsch
The Repository Analytics and Metrics Portal (RAMP) is a web service that aggregates use and performance use data of institutional repositories. The data are a subset of data from RAMP, the Repository Analytics and Metrics Portal (http://rampanalytics.org), consisting of data from all participating repositories for the calendar year 2021. For a description of the data collection, processing, and output methods, please see the "methods" section below. The record will be revised periodically to make new...

Repository Analytics and Metrics Portal (RAMP) 2020 data

Jonathan Wheeler & Kenning Arlitsch
Version update: The originally uploaded versions of the CSV files in this dataset included an extra column, "Unnamed: 0," which is not RAMP data and was an artifact of the process used to export the data to CSV format. This column has been removed from the revised dataset. The data are otherwise the same as in the first version. The Repository Analytics and Metrics Portal (RAMP) is a web service that aggregates use and performance...

Code in support of: Physical and chemical mechanisms that influence the electrical conductivity of lignin-derived biochar

Seth Kane, Rachel Ulrich, Abigail Harrington, Nicholas P. Stadie & Cecily Ryan
Lignin-derived biochar is a promising, sustainable alternative to petroleum-based carbon powders (e.g., carbon black) for electrode and energy storage applications. Prior studies of these biochars demonstrate that high electrical conductivity and good capacitive behavior are achievable. These studies also show high variability in electrical conductivity between biochars (~10^-2-10^2 S/cm). The underlying mechanisms that lead to desirable electrical properties in these lignin-derived biochars are poorly understood. In this work, we examine the causes of the variation...

Influence of biomimicry structures on ecosystem function in a Rocky Mountain incised stream

James Reinert, Lindsey Albertson & James Junker
Rising levels of stream degradation have motivated a boom in restoration projects across the globe. However, post-restoration monitoring is still frequently lacking and does not always incorporate biotic responses to changes in the physical template. Beaver mimicry structures (BMS) are becoming a popular tool to restore degraded streams throughout the American West, but relatively little is known about how these installations influence both biotic and abiotic factors, with consequences for ecosystem functioning. We monitored basal...

Interspecific variation in evaporative water loss and temperature response, but not metabolic rate, among hibernating bats

Liam McGuire, Nathan Fuller, Yvonne Dzal, Catherine Haase, Brandon Klüg-Baerwald, Kirk Silas, Raina Plowright, Cori Lausen, Craig Willis & Sarah Olson
Hibernation is widespread among mammals in a variety of environmental contexts. However, few experimental studies consider interspecific comparisons, and for many unstudied (or understudied) species we must assume the underlying physiology of hibernation is comparable to the relatively few species that have been studied in detail. Studies of interspecific variation provide insight into general patterns of hibernation strategies. We studied 13 species of free-living bats, including populations spread over thousands of kilometers and diverse habitats....

Interspecific trait variability and local soil conditions modulate grassland model community responses to climate

Franklin Alongi, Jana Rüthers, Justyna Giejsztowt, Katrina LaPaglia & Anke Jentsch
High elevation grasslands provide critical services in agriculture and ecosystem stabilization. However, these ecosystems face elevated risks of disturbance due to predicted soil and climate changes. We experimentally exposed model grassland communities, comprised of three species grown on either local or reference soil, to varied climatic environments along an elevational gradient in the European Alps, measuring the effects on species and community traits. Although species-specific biomass varied across soil and climate, species’ proportional contributions to...

Wildfire severity alters drivers of interaction beta-diversity in plant-bee networks

Laura A. Burkle, R. Travis Belote & Jonathan A. Myers
Spatial variation in species interactions (interaction β-diversity) and its ecological drivers are poorly understood, despite their relevance to community assembly, conservation, and ecosystem functioning. We investigated effects of wildfire severity on patterns and four proximate ecological drivers of interaction β-diversity in plant-bee communities across three localities in the Northern Rocky Mountains (Montana, USA). Wildfires decreased interaction β-diversity but increased interaction frequency (number of visits) and richness (number of links). After controlling for interaction frequency and...

Loss of an apex predator in the wild induces physiological changes in prey

Neil Hammerschlag, Chris Fallows, Michael Meyer, Simon Seakamela, Samantha Orndorff, Stephen Kirkman, Deon Kotze & Scott Creel
Predators can impact prey via predation or risk effects, which can initiate trophic cascades. Given widespread population declines of apex predators, understanding and predicting the associated ecological consequences is a priority. When predation risk is relatively unpredictable or uncontrollable by prey, the loss of predators is hypothesized to release prey from stress; however, there are few tests of this hypothesis in the wild. A well-studied predator-prey system between white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) and Cape fur...

Heterogeneity in risk-sensitive allocation of somatic reserves in a long-lived mammal

Rachel Smiley, Rachel Smiley, Brittany L. Wagler, Tayler LaSharr, Kristin Denryter, Thomas Stephenson, Alyson Courtemanch, Tony Mong, Daryl Lutz, Doug McWhirter, Doug Brimeyer, Patrick Hnilicka, Blake Lowrey & Kevin Monteith
Patterns of food quality and availability, when combined with energetic demands in seasonal environments, shape resource acquisition and allocation by animals and hold consequences for life-history strategies. In long-lived species with extensive maternal care, regulation of somatic reserves of energy and protein can occur in a risk-sensitive manner, wherein resources are preferentially allocated to support survival at the cost of investment in reproduction. We investigated how Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), an alpine mammal...

Chickensplash: splash trial videos

Caitlin Carmody, Rebecca Mueller, Benjamin Grodner, Ondrej Chlumsky, James Wilking & Scott McCalla
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends against washing raw chicken due to the risk of transferring dangerous food-borne pathogens through splashed drops of water. Many cooks continue to wash raw chicken despite this warning, however, and there is a lack of scientific research assessing the extent of microbial transmission in splashed droplets. Here we use large agar plates to confirm that bacteria can be transferred from the surface of raw chicken through splashing. We...

Locations of GPS-collared moose and geographic correlates, as well as for random points within study area

Richard Harris, Braden Burkholder, Nicholas DeCesare, Vanna Boccardori & Robert Garrott
Moose are among the many species that are vulnerable to both direcdt and indirect effects of climate change. Habitat selection is one framework to assist investigators in disentangling the various factors (including weather) that ultimately dictate how animals respond to their environment. We investigated patterns of winter habitat selecdtion by adult female moose in southerwestern MOntana, USA, during 2007-2010, and how that selection was affected by snow (quantified by snow water equivalent) and winter temperatures....

Global distribution and climate sensitivity of the tropical montane forest nitrogen cycle

Justin Gay, Jack Brookshire & Bryce Currey
Tropical forests are pivotal to global climate and biogeochemical cycles, yet the geographic distribution of nutrient limitation to plants and microbes across the biome is unresolved. One long-standing generalization is that tropical montane forests are nitrogen (N)-limited whereas lowland forests tend to be N-rich. However, empirical tests of this hypothesis have yielded equivocal results. Here we evaluate the topographic signature of the ecosystem-level tropical N cycle by examining climatic and geophysical controls of surface soil...

Data from: Pathogen spillover driven by rapid changes in bat ecology. Dataset A: Register of Hendra virus spillovers to horses

Peggy Eby, Alison Peel, Andrew Hoegh, Wyatt Madden, John Giles, Peter Hudson & Raina Plowright

Registration Year

  • 2022
    36
  • 2021
    23
  • 2020
    32
  • 2019
    11
  • 2018
    10
  • 2017
    8
  • 2016
    10
  • 2015
    5
  • 2014
    5
  • 2013
    2

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    141
  • Text
    2
  • Other
    1

Affiliations

  • Montana State University
    144
  • Pennsylvania State University
    16
  • Griffith University
    15
  • UNSW Sydney
    11
  • Cornell University
    11
  • Johns Hopkins University
    10
  • Center for Large Landscape Conservation
    10
  • United States Geological Survey
    9
  • University of Montana
    6
  • University of Arizona
    5