6 Works

Data from: Past and present dynamics of sorghum and pearl millet diversity in Mount Kenya region

Vanesse Labeyrie, Monique Deu, Yann Dussert, Bernard Rono, Françoise Lamy, Charles Marangu, Dan Kiambi, Caroline Calatayud, Geo Coppens D’Eeckenbrugge, Thierry Robert, Christian Leclerc & Geo Coppens D'Eeckenbrugge
Crop populations in smallholder farming systems are shaped by the interaction of biological, ecological and social processes, occurring on different spatiotemporal scales. Understanding these dynamics is fundamental for the conservation of crop genetic resources. In this paper we investigated the processes involved in sorghum and pearl millet diversity dynamics on Mount Kenya. Surveys were conducted in ten sites distributed along two elevation transects and occupied by six ethnolinguistic groups. Varieties of both species grown in...

Data from: Adaptation to climate through flowering phenology: a case study in Medicago truncatula

Concetta Burgarella, Nathalie Chantret, Laurène Gay, Jean-Marie Prosperi, Maxime Bonhomme, Peter Tiffin, Nevin D. Young & Joelle Ronfort
Local climatic conditions likely constitute an important selective pressure on genes underlying important fitness-related traits such as flowering time and in many species flowering phenology and climatic gradients strongly covary. To test whether climate shapes genetic variation on flowering time genes and to identify candidate flowering genes involved in the adaptation to environmental heterogeneity, we used a large M. truncatula core collection to examine the association between nucleotide polymorphisms at 224 candidate genes and both...

Data from: 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing for epidemiological surveys of bacteria in wildlife

Maxime Galan, Maria Razzauti, Emilie Bard, Maria Bernard, Carine Brouat, Nathalie Charbonnel, Alexandre Dehne-Garcia, Anne Loiseau, Caroline Tatard, Lucie Tamisier, Muriel Vayssier-Taussat, Hélène Vignes & Jean-François Cosson
The human impact on natural habitats is increasing the complexity of human-wildlife interactions and leading to the emergence of infectious diseases worldwide. Highly successful synanthropic wildlife species, such as rodents, will undoubtedly play an increasingly important role in transmitting zoonotic diseases. We investigated the potential for recent developments in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to facilitate the multiplexing of the large numbers of samples needed to improve our understanding of the risk of zoonotic disease transmission...

Data from: Partial genotyping at polymorphic markers can improve heritability estimates in sibling groups

J. Gauzere, S. Oddou-Muratorio, L. Gay & E. K. Klein
Accurate estimates of heritability (h²) are necessary to assess adaptive responses of populations and evolution of fitness-related traits in changing environments. For plants, h² estimates generally rely on maternal progeny designs, assuming that offspring are either half-sibs or unrelated. However, plant mating systems often depart from half-sib assumptions, this can bias h² estimates. Here, we investigate how to accurately estimate h² in non-model species through the analysis of sibling designs with a moderate genotyping effort....

Data from: A replicated climate change field experiment reveals rapid evolutionary response in an ecologically important soil invertebrate

Thomas Bataillon, Nicolas Galtier, Aurelien Bernard, Nicolai Cryer, Nicolas Faivre, Sylvain Santoni, Dany Severac, Theis N. Mikkelsen, Klaus S. Larsen, Claus Beier, Jesper G. Sørensen, Martin Holmstrup, Bodil Ehlers, Bodil K. Ehlers & Teis N. Mikkelsen
Whether species can respond evolutionarily to current climate change is crucial for the persistence of many species. Yet, very few studies have examined genetic responses to climate change in manipulated experiments carried out in natural field conditions. We examined the evolutionary response to climate change in a common annelid worm using a controlled replicated experiment where climatic conditions were manipulated in a natural setting. Analyzing the transcribed genome of 15 local populations, we found that...

Data from: Association mapping for phenology and plant architecture in maize shows higher power for developmental traits compared with growth influenced traits

Sophie Bouchet, Pascal Bertin, Thomas Presterl, Philippe Jamin, Denis Coubriche, Brigitte Gouesnard, Jacques Laborde & Alain Charcosset
Plant architecture, phenology and yield components of cultivated plants have repeatedly been shaped by selection to meet human needs and adaptation to different environments. Here we assessed the genetic architecture of 24 correlated maize traits that interact during plant cycle. Overall, 336 lines were phenotyped in a network of 9 trials and genotyped with 50K single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Phenology was the main factor of differentiation between genetic groups. Then yield components distinguished dents from lower yielding...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Genetic Improvement and Adaptation of Mediterranean and Tropical Plants
    6
  • University of Paris-Sud
    2
  • Ecologie, Systématique et Evolution
    1
  • University of Toulouse
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • Aarhus University
    1
  • Bipar
    1
  • Sorbonne University
    1
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    1
  • Ecologie des Forêts Méditerranéennes
    1