31 Works

Data from: Sperm is a sexual ornament in rose bitterling

Carl Smith, Rowena Spence & Martin Reichard
In many taxa, odour cues mediate mating decisions. A key question is what these odours comprise, where they are produced, and what they signal. Using rose bitterling, fish that spawn in the gills of freshwater mussels, we investigated the role of sperm cues on female oviposition decisions using individuals of known MHC genotype. Male bitterling frequently released sperm prior to female oviposition and females responded with an increased probability of oviposition and released a greater...

Data from: Model selection with overdispersed distance sampling data

Eric J. Howe, Stephen T. Buckland, Marie-Lyne Després-Einspenner & Hjalmar S. Kühl
1. Distance sampling (DS) is a widely-used framework for estimating animal abundance. DS models assume that observations of distances to animals are independent. Non-independent observations introduce overdispersion, causing model selection criteria such as AIC or AICc to favour overly complex models, with adverse effects on accuracy and precision. 2. We describe, and evaluate via simulation and with real data, estimators of an overdispersion factor (c ̂), and associated adjusted model selection criteria (QAIC) for use...

Data from: Quantification and decomposition of environment-selection relationships

Darren Clarke Hunter, Josephine M. Pemberton, Jill G. Pilkington & Michael B. Morrissey
In nature, selection varies across time in most environments, but we lack an understanding of how specific ecological changes drive this variation. Ecological factors can alter phenotypic selection coefficients through changes in trait distributions or individual mean fitness, even when the trait-absolute fitness relationship remains constant. We apply and extend a regression-based approach in a population of Soay sheep (Ovis aries) and suggest metrics of environment-selection relationships that can be compared across studies. We then...

Data from: Incorporating non-equilibrium dynamics into demographic history inferences of a migratory marine species

Emma L. Carroll, Rachael Alderman, John L. Bannister, Martine Bérubé, Peter B. Best, Laura Boren, C. Scott Baker, Rochelle Constantine, Ken Findlay, Robert Harcourt, Louisiane Lemaire, Per J. Palsbøll, Nathalie J. Patenaude, Victoria J. Rowntree, Jon Seger, Debbie Steel, Luciano O. Valenzuela, Mandy Watson & Oscar E. Gaggiotti
Understanding how dispersal and gene flow link geographically separated populations over evolutionary history is challenging, particularly in migratory marine species. In southern right whales (SRWs, Eubalaena australis), patterns of genetic diversity are likely influenced by the glacial climate cycle and recent history of whaling. Here we use a dataset of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences (n=1,327) and nuclear markers (17 microsatellite loci, n=222) from major wintering grounds to investigate circumpolar population structure, historical demography, and effective...

Data from: Assessing cetacean surveys throughout the Mediterranean Sea: a gap analysis in environmental space

Laura Mannocci, Jason J. Roberts, Patrick N. Halpin, Matthieu Authier, Olivier Boisseau, Mohamed Nejmeddine Bradai, Ana Cañadas, Carla Chicote, Léa David, Nathalie Di-Méglio, Caterina M. Fortuna, Alexandros Frantzis, Manel Gazo, Tilen Genov, Philip S. Hammond, Drasko Holcer, Kristin Kaschner, Dani Kerem, Giancarlo Lauriano, Tim Lewis, Giuseppe Notarbartolo Di Sciara, Simone Panigada, Juan Antonio Raga, Aviad Scheinin, Vincent Ridoux … & Joseph Vella
Heterogeneous data collection in the marine environment has led to large gaps in our knowledge of marine species distributions. To fill these gaps, models calibrated on existing data may be used to predict species distributions in unsampled areas, given that available data are sufficiently representative. Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility of mapping cetacean densities across the entire Mediterranean Sea using models calibrated on available survey data and various environmental covariates. We aggregated 302,481...

Data from: Patterns of phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation in the wide elevation range of the alpine plant Arabis alpina

Pierre De Villemereuil, Médéric Mouterde, Oscar E. Gaggiotti & Irène Till-Bottraud
Local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity are two important characteristics of alpine plants to overcome the threats caused by global changes. Among alpine species, Arabis alpina is characterised by an unusually wide altitudinal amplitude, ranging from 800 to 3,100 m of elevation in the French Alps. Two non‐exclusive hypotheses can explain the presence of A. alpina across this broad ecological gradient: adaptive phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation, making this species especially useful to better understand these...

Data from: Inter- and intra-specific genomic divergence in Drosophila montana shows evidence for cold adaptation

Darren J. Parker, R. Axel W. Wiberg, Urmi Trivedi, Venera I. Tyukmaeva, Karim Gharbi, Roger K. Butlin, Anneli Hoikkala, Maaria Kankare & Michael G. Ritchie
D. montana gff fileGenome annotation file for D. montana genome (Accession number: LUVX00000000)D.mont_freeze_v1.4.gff.txt

Data from: A 2.6‐g sound and movement tag for studying the acoustic scene and kinematics of echolocating bats

Laura Stidsholt, Mark Johnson, Kristian Beedholm, Lasse Jakobsen, Kathrin Kugler, Signe Brinkløv, Angeles Salles, Cynthia F. Moss & Peter Teglberg Madsen
1. To study sensorimotor behaviour in wild animals, it is necessary to synchronously record the sensory inputs available to the animal, and its movements. To do this, we have developed a biologging device that can record the primary sensory information and the associated movements during foraging and navigating in echolocating bats. 2. This 2.6 -gram tag records the sonar calls and echoes from an ultrasonic microphone, while simultaneously sampling fine-scale movement in three dimensions from...

Data from: Reticulate evolution within a spruce (Picea) species complex revealed by population genomic analysis

Yongshuai Sun, Richard J. Abbott, Zhiqiang Lu, Kangshan Mao, Lei Zhang, Xiaojuan Wang, Dafu Ru & Jianquan Liu
The role of reticulation in the rapid diversification of organisms is attracting greater attention in evolutionary biology. Here, we report a population genomics approach to test the role of hybridization and introgression in the evolution of the Picea likiangensis species complex. Based on 84,793 SNPs detected in transcriptomes of 82 trees collected from 35 localities, we identified 18 hybrids (including backcrosses) distributed within the range boundaries of the four taxa. Coalescent simulations, for each pair...

Data from: Completing the hybridization triangle: the inheritance of genetic incompatibilities during homoploid hybrid speciation in ragworts (Senecio).

Adrian C. Brennan, Simon J. Hiscock & Richard J. Abbott
A new homoploid hybrid lineage needs to establish a degree of reproductive isolation from its parent species if it is to persist as an independent entity, but the role hybridization plays in this process is known in only a handful of cases. The homoploid hybrid ragwort species, Senecio squalidus, (Oxford ragwort) originated following the introduction of hybrid plants to the UK approximately 320 years ago. The source of the hybrid plants was from a naturally...

Data from: Social effects on fruit fly courtship song

Lucas Marie-Orleach, Nathan W. Bailey & Michael G. Ritchie
Courtship behaviour in Drosophila has often been described as a classic innate behavioural repertoire, but more recently extensive plasticity has been described. In particular, prior exposure to acoustic signals of con- or heterspecific males can change courtship traits in both sexes that are liable to be important in reproductive isolation. However, it is unknown whether male courtship song itself is socially plastic. We examined courtship song plasticity of two species in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup....

Data from: Monogamy promotes altruistic sterility in insect societies

Nicholas G. Davies & Andy Gardner
Monogamy is associated with sibling-directed altruism in multiple animal taxa, including insects, birds, and mammals. Inclusive-fitness theory readily explains this pattern by identifying high relatedness as a promoter of altruism. In keeping with this prediction, monogamy should promote the evolution of voluntary sterility in insect societies if sterile workers make for better helpers. However, a recent mathematical population-genetics analysis failed to identify a consistent effect of monogamy on voluntary worker sterility. Here, we revisit that...

Data from: Opposing patterns of intraspecific and interspecific differentiation in sex chromosomes and autosomes

Peter A. Moran, Sonia Pascoal, Timothée Cezard, Judith E. Risse, Michael G. Ritchie & Nathan W. Bailey
Linking intraspecific and interspecific divergence is an important challenge in speciation research. X chromosomes are expected to evolve faster than autosomes and disproportionately contribute to reproductive barriers, and comparing genetic variation on X and autosomal markers within and between species can elucidate evolutionary processes that shape genome variation. We performed RADseq on a 16-population transect of two closely-related Australian cricket species, Teleogryllus commodus and T. oceanicus, covering allopatry and sympatry. This classic study system for...

Data from: Vestigial singing behaviour persists after the evolutionary loss of song in crickets

Will T. Schneider, Christian Rutz, Berthold Hedwig & Nathan W. Bailey
The evolutionary loss of sexual traits is widely predicted. Because sexual signals can arise from the coupling of specialised motor activity with morphological structures, disruption to a single component could lead to overall loss of function. Opportunities to observe this process and characterise any remaining signal components are rare, but could provide insight into the mechanisms, indirect costs, and evolutionary consequences of signal loss. We investigated the recent evolutionary loss of a long-range acoustic sexual...

Data from: Isolation rearing does not constrain social plasticity in a family-living lizard

Julia L. Riley, Côme Guidou, Caroline Fryns, Johann Mourier, Stephan T. Leu, Daniel W.A. Noble, Richard W. Byrne, Martin J. Whiting & Daniel W A Noble
An animal’s social environment can be both dynamic and complex. Thus, social species often garner fitness benefits through being plastic in their social behavior. Yet, social plasticity can be constrained by an individual’s experience. We examined the influence of early social environment on social behavior in the tree skink (Egernia striolata), a family-living lizard. In the first phase of this study, we reared juveniles in two different social environments for 1.5 years: either in isolation...

Data from: A non-parametric maximum test for the Behrens–Fisher problem

Anke Welz, Graeme D. Ruxton & Markus Neuhäuser
Non-normality and heteroscedasticity are common in applications. For the comparison of two samples in the non-parametric Behrens–Fisher problem, different tests have been proposed, but no single test can be recommended for all situations. Here, we propose combining two tests, the Welch t test based on ranks and the Brunner–Munzel test, within a maximum test. Simulation studies indicate that this maximum test, performed as a permutation test, controls the type I error rate and stabilizes the...

Data from: Sexual signal loss: the link between behavior and rapid evolutionary dynamics in a field cricket

Marlene Zuk, Nathan W. Bailey, Brian Gray & John T. Rotenberry
1. Sexual signals may be acquired or lost over evolutionary time, and are tempered in their exaggeration by natural selection. 2. In the Pacific field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus, a mutation (“flatwing”) causing loss of the sexual signal, the song, spread in < 20 generations in two of three Hawaiian islands where the crickets have been introduced. Flatwing (as well as some normal-wing) males behave as satellites, moving towards and settling near calling males to intercept...

Data from: Quantifying uncertainty due to fission-fusion dynamics as a component of social complexity

Gabriel Ramos-Fernandez, Andrew J. King, Jacinta C. Beehner, Thore J. Bergman, Margaret C. Crofoot, Anthony Di Fiore, Julia Lehmann, Colleen M. Schaffner, Noah Snyder-Mackler, Klaus Zuberbühler, Filippo Aureli & Denis Boyer
Groups of animals (including humans) may show flexible grouping patterns, in which temporary aggregations or subgroups come together and split, changing composition over short temporal scales, i.e. fission and fusion). A high degree of fission-fusion dynamics may constrain the regulation of social relationships, introducing uncertainty in interactions between group members. Here we use Shannon's entropy to quantify the predictability of subgroup composition for three species known to differ in the way their subgroups come together...

Data from: Local weather and body condition influence habitat use and movements on land of molting female southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina)

Laureline L. Chaise, Iris Prinet, Camille Toscani, Susan L. Gallon, William Paterson, Dominic J. McCafferty, Marc Théry, André Ancel & Caroline Gilbert
Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) are known to move and aggregate while moulting, but little is known about their behaviour on land during this time. In this study, 60 adult females were monitored (23 with GPS tags) during four moulting seasons, between 2012 and 2016 at Kerguelen Archipelago, Indian Ocean. Population surveys were recorded each year (N = 230 daily counts) and habitat use was analysed in relation to the stage of the moult and...

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi diversity data from a grassland microcosm experiment [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

D. Johnson, P.J. Vandenkoornhuyse, J.R. Leake, L. Gilbert, , J.P Grime, J.P.W. Young & D.J. Read
These arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi diversity data were collected in 2000 as part of an investigation in an unfertilized limestone grassland soil supporting different synthesized vascular plant assemblages that had developed for three years. The experimental treatments comprised: bare soil; monocultures of the non mycotrophic sedge Carex flacca; monocultures of the mycotrophic grass Festuca ovina; and a species-rich mixture of four forbs, four grasses and four sedges. The experiment was undertaken in microcosms, set up...

Data from: Variations in age- and sex-specific survival rates help explain population trend in a discrete marine mammal population

Mònica Arso Civil, Barbara Cheney, Nicola J. Quick, Valentina Islas-Villanueva, Jeff A. Graves, Vincent M. Janik, Paul M. Thompson & Phillip S. Hammond
1. Understanding the drivers underlying fluctuations in the size of animal populations is central to ecology, conservation biology and wildlife management. Reliable estimates of survival probabilities are key to population viability assessments, and patterns of variation in survival can help inferring the causal factors behind detected changes in population size. 2. We investigated whether variation in age and sex-specific survival probabilities could help explain the increasing trend in population size detected in a small, discrete...

Data from: Killer whales (Orcinus orca) in Iceland show weak genetic structure among diverse isotopic signatures and observed movement patterns

Sara B. Tavares, Filipa I.P. Samarra, Sonia Pascoal, Jeff A. Graves, Patrick J.O. Miller, Filipa I. P. Samarra & Patrick J. O. Miller
Local adaption through ecological niche specialization can lead to genetic structure between and within populations. In the Northeast Pacific, killer whales (Orcinus orca) of the same population have uniform specialized diets that are non-overlapping with other sympatric, genetically divergent and socially isolated killer whale ecotypes. However, killer whales in Iceland show intra-population variation of isotopic niches and observed movement patterns: some individuals appear to specialise on herring and follow it year-round while others feed upon...

Data from: Cultural revolutions reduce complexity in the songs of humpback whales

Jenny A. Allen, Ellen C. Garland, Rebecca A. Dunlop & Michael J. Noad
Much evidence for non-human culture comes from vocally learned displays, such as the vocal dialects and song displays of birds and cetaceans. While many oscine birds use song complexity to assess male fitness, the role of complexity in humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) song is uncertain due to population-wide conformity to one song pattern. Although songs change gradually each year, the eastern Australian population also completely replaces their song every few years in cultural ‘revolutions’. Revolutions...

Mathematically modelled daily water saturation profiles for sites on the Namoi River floodplain in south-east Australia at different distances from the river

C.M. Evans, D.G. Dritschel & M.B. Singer
This dataset comprises mathematically modelled data of soil-water saturation, along vertical profiles, at 6 sites near the Namoi River, south-eastern Australia. The vertical profiles span the soil surface down to 10m deep, divided into 944 intervals. The 6 sites are located at different distances from the Namoi River and are split between 2 locations (Old Mollee and Yarral East). The distances from the river channel at each location are, Old Mollee: 50m, 140m and 320m,...

Data from: Early development of vocal interaction rules in a duetting songbird

Karla D. Rivera-Cáceres, Esmeralda Quirós-Guerrero, Marcelo Araya-Salas, Christopher N. Templeton & William A. Searcy
Exchange of vocal signals is an important aspect of animal communication. Although birdsong is the premier model for understanding vocal development, the development of vocal interaction rules in birds and possible parallels to humans have been little studied. Many tropical songbirds engage in complex engage in vocal interactions in the form of duets between mated pairs. In some species duets show precise temporal coordination and follow rules (duet codes) governing which song type one bird...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    31

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    31

Affiliations

  • University of St Andrews
    31
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • University of Edinburgh
    3
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • Duke University
    2
  • Sichuan University
    2
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • Lanzhou University
    2
  • Macquarie University
    2
  • University College Cork
    2