43 Works

Data from: Why do zoos attract crows? A comparative study from Europe and Asia

László Kövér, Szabolcs Lengyel, Makiko Takenaka, Alice Kirchmeir, Florian Uhl, Rachel Miller & Christine Schwab
Crows have successfully colonized many cities and urban zoos have been important in this process. To evaluate why zoos attract crows, we quantified crow numbers and behaviour in three zoos in Europe (Debrecen, Edinburgh, Vienna) and one in Asia (Sapporo). Data were collected in 445 surveys over 297 days in summer 2014 and winter 2014-15. We found that crow numbers were highest in Vienna, intermediate in Debrecen and Edinburgh and lowest in Sapporo, increased significantly...

Data from: EDAPHOLOG monitoring system: automatic, real-time detection of soil microarthropods

Miklós Dombos, Oxána Bánszegi, Katalin Szlávecz & Andrés Kosztolányi
Soil microarthropods as organic matter decomposers play an important role in soil functioning thus providing ecosystem services. However, ecosystem scale investigations on their abundance and dynamics are scarce because their high spatio-temporal heterogeneity requires huge sample size. Processing and identifying large number of individuals are extremely labour-intensive. We prototyped a device called EDAPHOLOG monitoring system that consists of (1) a probe that catches and detects microarthropods and estimates their body size; (2) a data logger...

Data from: Endozoochory of aquatic ferns and angiosperms by mallards in Central Europe

Adam Lovas-Kiss, Balázs Vizi, Orsolya Vincze, Attila Molnár V. & Andy J. Green
1. Modern literature on plant dispersal by birds focuses mainly on the importance of frugivory and scatter-hoarding, yet recent studies show that endozoochory by migratory waterbirds is an important mechanism of long-distance dispersal for a broad range of plants. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical field studies that identify the plants dispersed by waterbirds, and relate them to expectations based on dispersal syndromes. To date, there are no detailed studies of the level of...

WHO LIKES IN THE END? METHODS FOR IMPROVING THE SAFE USE OF THE INTERNET

Viktoria Bene
Nauczyciele, edukatorzy muszą zmierzyć się z nowym wyzwaniem, które spowodowała rewolucja cyfrowa. Przestrzeń cyfrowa, zwłaszcza media społecznościowe, odgrywają ważną rolę w życiu młodych ludzi. Dzięki Internetowi mogą z łatwością uzyskiwać informacje, mają szansę wykorzystać swoją kreatywność i tworzyć blogi lub videoblogi. Z drugiej strony Internet ma „ciemną stronę”, na którą składa się cyberprzemoc, fałszywe wiadomości i problemy z samooceną. Niektórym nauczycielom trudno jest dotrzymać kroku narastającym zmianom i rozmawiać o nich z młodymi ludźmi. Niemniej...

Data from: Brain regions associated with visual cues are important for bird migration

Orsolya Vincze, Csongor I. Vágási, Péter L. Pap, Gergely Osváth & Anders Pape Møller
Long-distance migratory birds have relatively smaller brains than short-distance migrants or residents. Here, we test whether reduction in brain size with migration distance can be generalized across the different brain regions suggested to play key roles in orientation during migration. Based on 152 bird species, belonging to 61 avian families from six continents, we show that the sizes of both the telencephalon and the whole brain decrease, and the relative size of the optic lobe...

Data from: Parental care and the evolution of terrestriality in frogs

Balázs Vági, Zsolt Végvári, András Liker, Robert P. Freckleton & Tamás Székely
Frogs and toads (Anura) exhibit some of the most diverse parental strategies in vertebrates. Identifying the evolutionary origins of parenting is fundamental to understanding the relationships between sexual selection, social evolution and parental care systems of contemporary Anura. Moreover, parenting has been hypothesized to allow the invasion of terrestrial habitats by the ancestors of terrestrial vertebrates. Using comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of frogs and toads based on data from over 1000 species that represent 46 out...

Data from: Global pattern of nest predation is disrupted by climate change in shorebirds

Vojtěch Kubelka, Miroslav Šálek, Pavel Tomkovich, Zsolt Végvári, Robert P. Freckleton & Tamás Székely
Ongoing climate change is thought to disrupt trophic relationships, with consequences for complex interspecific interactions, yet the effects of climate change on species interactions are poorly understood, and such effects have not been documented at a global scale. Using a single database of 38,191 nests from 237 populations, we found that shorebirds have experienced a worldwide increase in nest predation over the past 70 years. Historically, there existed a latitudinal gradient in nest predation, with...

Data from: Light enough to travel or wise enough to stay? Brain size evolution and migratory behaviour in birds

Orsolya Vincze
Brain size relative to body size is smaller in migratory than in non-migratory birds. Two mutually non-exclusive hypotheses had been proposed to explain this association. On the one hand, the ‘energetic trade-off hypothesis’ claims that migratory species were selected to have smaller brains because of the interplay between neural tissue volume and migratory flight. In contrast, the ‘behavioural flexibility hypothesis’ argues that resident species are selected to have higher cognitive capacities, and therefore larger brains,...

Data from: Persistence of an extreme male-biased adult sex ratio in a natural population of polyandrous bird

András Kosztolányi, Zoltan Barta, Clemens Küpper & Tamás Székely
In a number of insects, fishes and birds the conventional sex roles are reversed: males are the main care provider whereas females focus on matings. The reversal of typical sex roles is an evolutionary puzzle, because it challenges the foundations of sex roles, sexual selection and parental investment theory. Recent theoretical models predict that biased parental care may be a response to biased adult sex ratios (ASRs). However, estimating ASR is challenging in natural populations,...

Data from: Do large-seeded herbs have a small range size? The seed mass-distribution range trade-off hypothesis

Judit Sonkoly, Balázs Deák, Orsolya Valkó, Attila Molnár V., Béla Tóthmérész & Péter Török
We aimed to introduce and test the “seed mass–distribution range trade-off” hypothesis, that is, that range size is negatively related to seed mass due to the generally better dispersal ability of smaller seeds. Studying the effects of environmental factors on the seed mass and range size of species, we also aimed to identify habitats where species may be at risk and need extra conservation effort to avoid local extinctions. We collected data for seed mass,...

Patterns of pollination interactions at community-level are related to the type and quantity of floral resources

Péter Török, Edy Fantinato, Judit Sonkoly, Péter Török & Gabriella Buffa
1. A fundamental question in community ecology is how the quantity of floral resources affects pollinator activity and how this relates to the structure and robustness of pollination networks. The issue has been mainly addressed at species level, while at community level several questions are still open. 2. Using a species-rich semi-natural grassland as model ecosystem, we explored the relationship between community-level quantity of floral resources, the number of flower visits at community-level and descriptors...

Avian plumage and eggshell colouration covary with sex-specific contributions to nest building

Jenő Nagy, Mark E. Hauber & Mark C. Mainwaring
Interspecific variation in sex-specific contributions to nest building remain poorly understood. We examine whether the colouration of parents and of eggs influences sex-specific nest building contributions in 521 species of Western Palearctic birds. Having colourful plumage and laying colourful eggs are costly because of the deposition of pigments (in feathers and eggs) and/or forming costly nanostructural substrates (of feathers). We tested the hypotheses that species in which females alone build nests (i) exhibit sexual plumage...

Social groups with diverse personalities mitigate physiological stress in a songbird

Csongor I. Vágási, Attila Fülöp, Gergely Osváth, Péter Pap, Janka Pénzes, Zoltán Benkő, Ádám Lendvai & Zoltán Barta
Social groups often consist of diverse phenotypes, including personality types, and this diversity is known to affect the functioning of the group as a whole. Social selection theory proposes that group composition (i.e. social environment) also influences the performance of individual group members. However, the effect of group behavioural composition on group members remains largely unexplored, and it is still contentious whether individuals benefit more in a social environment with homogeneous or diverse behavioural composition....

Data from: Interspecific variation in the structural properties of flight feathers in birds indicates adaptation to flight requirements and habitat

Peter L. Pap, Gergely Osvath, Krisztina Sandor, Orsolya Vincze, Lorinc Barbos, Attila Marton, Robert L. Nudds & Csongor I. Vagasi
1. The functional significance of intra- and interspecific structural variations in the flight feathers of birds is poorly understood. Here, a phylogenetic comparative analysis of four structural features (rachis width, barb and barbule density and porosity) of proximal and distal primary feathers of 137 European bird species was conducted. 2. Flight type (flapping and soaring, flapping and gliding, continuous flapping or passerine type), habitat (terrestrial, riparian or aquatic), wing characteristics (wing area, S and aspect...

Data from: Cohabitation with farm animals rather than breeding effort increases the infection with feather-associated bacteria in the barn swallow Hirundo rustica

Attila Fülöp, I. Csongor Vágási & Péter László Pap
Feather-associated bacteria are widespread inhabitants of avian plumage. However, the determinants of the between-individual variation in plumage bacterial loads are less well understood. Infection intensities can be determined by ecological factors, such as breeding habitat, and can be actively regulated by hosts via preening. Preening, yet, is a resource intensive activity, and thus might be traded-off against reproductive investment in breeding birds. Here, we studied barn swallows Hirundo rustica to assess the bacterial cost of...

Data from: Higher seed number compensates for lower fruit set in deceptive orchids

Judit Sonkoly, Anna E. Vojtkó, Jácint Tökölyi, Péter Török, Gábor Sramkó, Zoltán Illyés & Attila V. Molnár
1. Floral deception is widespread in orchids, with more than one third of the species being pollinated this way. The evolutionary success of deceptive orchids is puzzling, as species employing this strategy are thought to have low reproductive success (less flowers yielding fruits) because of low pollination rates. However, direct measurements of total seed production in orchids – which is a better measure of reproductive success – are scarce due to the extremely small size...

Data from: Functional diversity supports the biomass-diversity humped-back relationship in phytoplankton assemblages

Péter Török, Enikő T-Krasznai, Viktória B-Béres, István Bácsi, Gábor Borics & Béla Tóthmérész
Modelling the relationship between biomass and diversity in phytoplankton assemblages provides new insights into the mechanisms responsible for the coexistence of species, even in terrestrial ecosystems. We tested the biomass–diversity relationship in lake phytoplankton along a wide biomass gradient using functional species groups. We hypothesized that changes in the taxonomic diversity of the phytoplankton along a biomass gradient are associated with altered functional diversity. For the analyses, in total 768 samples were collected from 30...

Data from: Integrating restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) with morphological cladistic analysis clarifies evolutionary relationships among major species groups of bee orchids

Richard M. Bateman, Gábor Sramkó & Ovidiu Paun
Background and Aims. Bee orchids (Ophrys) have become the most popular model system for studying reproduction via insect-mediated pseudo-copulation and for exploring the consequent, putatively adaptive, evolutionary radiations. However, despite intensive past research, both the phylogenetic structure and species diversity within the genus remain highly contentious. Here, we integrate next-generation sequencing and morphological cladistics techniques to clarify the phylogeny of the genus. Methods. At least two accessions of each of the ten species groups previously...

Data from: Rainy springs linked to poor nestling growth in a declining avian aerial insectivore (Tachycineta bicolor)

Amelia R. Cox, Raleigh J. Robertson, Ádám Z. Lendvai, Kennedy Everitt & Frances Bonier
As species shift their ranges and phenology to cope with climate change, many are left without a ready supply of their preferred food source during critical life stages. Food shortages are often assumed to be driven by reduced total food abundance, but here we propose that climate change may cause short-term food shortages for foraging specialists without affecting overall food availability. We frame this hypothesis around the special case of birds that forage on flying...

Data from: The evolution of parental cooperation in birds

Vladimír Remeš, Robert P. Freckleton, Jácint Tökölyi, András Liker & Tamás Székely
Parents in many animal species care for their offspring. In some species, males care more; in other species, females care more; in still other species, the contribution of the sexes is equal. However, we do not know what explains these differences among species. Using the most comprehensive analyses of parental care to date, here we show that parents cooperate more when sexual selection is not intense and the adult sex ratio of males to females...

Data from: Experimental increase in baseline corticosterone level reduces oxidative damage and enhances innate immune response

Csongor I. Vágási, Laura Pătraș, Péter L. Pap, Orsolya Vincze, Cosmin Mureșan, József Németh & Ádám Z. Lendvai
Glucocorticoid (GC) hormones are significant regulators of homeostasis. The physiological effects of GCs critically depend on the time of exposure (short vs. long) as well as on their circulating levels (baseline vs. stress-induced). Previous experiments, in which chronic and high elevation of GC levels was induced, indicate that GCs impair both the activity of the immune system and the oxidative balance. Nonetheless, our knowledge on how mildly elevated GC levels, a situation much more common...

Data from: Both trait-neutrality and filtering effects are validated by the vegetation patterns detected in the functional recovery of sand grasslands

Péter Török, Gábor Matus, Edina Tóth, Mária Papp, András Kelemen, Judit Sonkoly & Béla Tóthmérész
Neutral theory of species assembly means that species assembly is governed by stochastic dispersal processes and fluctuations in established populations. An alternative theory suggests that assembly is strongly determined by functional trait filtering governed by abiotic and biotic filtering selecting species from the local species pool. To test these assumptions, in the current paper we analysed vegetation changes in the first 12 years of succession after heavy goose grazing on acidic sand. With trait-based analyses...

Data from: Large-brained birds suffer less oxidative damage

Csongor I. Vágási, Orsolya Vincze, Laura Pătraș, Gergely Osváth, Attila Marton, Lőrinc Bărbos, Daniel Sol & Péter L. Pap
Large brains (relative to body size) might confer fitness benefits to animals. Although the putative costs of well-developed brains can constrain the majority of species to modest brain sizes, these costs are still poorly understood. Given that the neural tissue is energetically expensive and demands antioxidants, one potential cost of developing and maintaining large brains is increased oxidative stress (‘oxidation exposure’ hypothesis). Alternatively, because large-brained species exhibit slow-paced life histories, they are expected to invest...

Data from: Roadside verges and cemeteries: comparative analysis of synanthropic orchid habitats in the Mediterranean Archipelago

Réka Fekete, Viktor Löki, Renáta Urgyán, Kristóf Süveges, Ádám Lovas-Kiss, Orsolya Vincze & Molnár V. Attila
Several important habitats have become threatened in the last few centuries in the Mediterranean Basin due to major changes adopted in land use practices. The consequent loss of natural and semi-natural orchid habitats lead to the appreciation of small anthropogenic habitats, such as cemeteries and roadside verges. Colonization of cemeteries and roadside verges by orchids has long been known, but no study to date compared the suitability of these two anthropogenic habitats for orchids. Therefore,...

Data from: Shorebirds as important vectors for plant dispersal in Europe

Ádám Lovas-Kiss, Marta I. Sanchez, David M. Wilkinson, Neil E. Coughlan, Jose A. Alves & Andy J. Green
Shorebirds (Charadriiformes) undergo rapid migrations with potential for long-distance dispersal (LDD) of plants. We studied the frequency of endozoochory by shorebirds in different parts of Europe covering a broad latitudinal range and different seasons. We assessed whether plants dispersed conformed to morphological dispersal syndromes. A total of 409 excreta samples (271 faeces and 138 pellets) were collected from redshank (Tringa totanus), black-winged stilt (Himantopus himantopus), pied avocet (Recurvirostra avosetta), northern lapwing (Vanellus vanellus), Eurasian curlew...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    7
  • 2020
    5
  • 2019
    6
  • 2018
    6
  • 2017
    7
  • 2016
    5
  • 2015
    6
  • 2011
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    42
  • Text
    1

Affiliations

  • University of Debrecen
    43
  • University of Bath
    8
  • Babeș-Bolyai University
    7
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    4
  • MTA Centre for Ecological Research
    4
  • University of Sheffield
    4
  • Hungarian Academy of Sciences
    3
  • University of Pannonia
    3
  • University of Montana
    2
  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
    2