4 Works

Data from: A journey on plate tectonics sheds light on European crayfish phylogeography

Lucian Pârvulescu, Jorge L. Pérez-Moreno, Cristian Panaiotu, Lucian Drăguț, Anne Schrimpf, Ioana‐Diana Popovici, Claudia Zaharia, András Weiperth, Blanka Gál, Christoph D. Schubart & Heather Bracken-Grissom
Crayfish can be used as model organisms in phylogeographic and divergence time studies if reliable calibrations are available. This study presents a comprehensive investigation into the phylogeography of the European stone crayfish (Austropotamobius torrentium) and includes samples from previously unstudied sites. Two mitochondrial markers were used to reveal evolutionary relationships among haplogroups throughout the species’ distributional range and to estimate the divergence time by employing both substitution rates and geological calibration methods. Our haplotype network...

Climate and mating systems as drivers of global diversity of parental care in frogs

Balázs Vági, Zsolt Végvári, András Liker, Robert P. Freckleton & Tamás Székely
Aim Amphibians exhibit unusually diverse reproductive modes, including a wide array of parental care strategies. The evolutionary drivers of this diversity, however, remain unclear. Here we investigate three major factors which may predict interspecific variation in parental care strategies: climate, intrasexual selection and social environment. We hypothesise that some care forms evolved to cope with harsh conditions such as dry or unpredictable habitats. We contrast this prediction with the hypothesis that parental roles have coevolved...

Data from: A unified model for optimizing riverscape conservation

Tibor Erõs, Jesse R. O'Hanley & István Czeglédi
1.Spatial prioritization tools provide a means of finding efficient trade-offs between biodiversity protection and the delivery of ecosystem services. Although a large number of prioritization approaches have been proposed in the literature, most are specifically designed for terrestrial systems. When applied to river ecosystems, they often fail to adequately account for the essential role that landscape connectivity plays in maintaining both biodiversity and ecosystem services. This is particularly true of longitudinal connectivity, which in many...

Plant dispersal syndromes are unreliable as predictors of zoochory and long-distance dispersal by ungulates and waterbirds

Andy J. Green, Christophe Baltzinger & Ádám Lovas-Kiss
Plant dispersal syndromes are allocated based on diaspore morphology and used to predict mechanisms of dispersal. Many authors assume that only angiosperms with endozoochory, epizoochory or anemochory syndromes have a long-distance dispersal (LDD) mechanism. Too much faith is often placed in classical syndromes to explain historical dispersal events and to predict future ones. The “endozoochory syndrome” is actually a “frugivory syndrome” and has often diverted attention from endozoochory by non-frugivores (e.g. waterbirds and large herbivores)...

Registration Year

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Affiliations

  • Danube Research Institute
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  • University of Bath
    1
  • National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment
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  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
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  • University of Kent
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  • University of Regensburg
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  • University of Koblenz and Landau
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  • Florida International University
    1
  • Balaton Limnological Institute
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  • University of Bucharest
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