65 Works

Data from: A keystone mutualism underpins resilience of a coastal ecosystem to drought

Christine Angelini, John N. Griffin, Johan Van De Koppel, Leon P. M. Lamers, Alfons J. P. Smolders, Marlous Derksen-Hooijberg, Tjisse Van Der Heide & Brian R. Silliman
Droughts are increasing in severity and frequency, yet the mechanisms that strengthen ecosystem resilience to this stress remain poorly understood. Here, we test whether positive interactions in the form of a mutualism between mussels and dominant cordgrass in salt marshes enhance ecosystem resistance to and recovery from drought. Surveys spanning 250 km of southeastern US coastline reveal spatially dispersed mussel mounds increased cordgrass survival during severe drought by 5- to 25-times. Surveys and mussel addition...

Data from: Ecosystem carbon density and allocation across a chronosequence of longleaf pine forests

Lisa J. Samuelson, Thomas A. Stokes, John R. Butnor, Kurt H. Johnsen, Carlos A. Gonzalez-Benecke, Timothy A. Martin, , Pete H. Anderson, Michael R. Ramirez, John C. Lewis & Wendell P. Cropper
Forests can partially offset greenhouse gas emissions and contribute to climate change mitigation, mainly through increases in live biomass. We quantified carbon (C) density in 20 managed longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests ranging in age from five to 118 years located across the southeastern USA and estimated above and belowground C trajectories. Ecosystem C stock (all pools including soil C) and aboveground live tree C increased nonlinearly with stand age and the modeled asymptotic...

Data from: Seasonal patterns in δ2H values of multiple tissues from Andean birds provide insights into elevational migration

Mariana Villegas, Seth D. Newsome & John G. Blake
Elevational migration is a widespread phenomenon in tropical avifauna but it is difficult to identify using traditional approaches. Hydrogen isotope (δ2H) values of precipitation decrease with elevation so δ2H analysis of multiple bird tissues with different isotopic incorporation rates may be a reliable method for characterizing seasonal elevational migration. Here we compare δ2H values in metabolically inert (feathers and claws) and metabolically active (whole blood) tissues to examine whether an upslope migration occurs prior to...

Data from: Experimental evidence of genome-wide impact of ecological selection during early stages of speciation-with-gene-flow

Scott P. Egan, Gregory J. Ragland, Lauren Assour, Thomas H. Q. Powell, Glen R. Hood, Scott Emrich, Patrik Nosil, Jeffrey L. Feder & Thomas H.Q. Powell
Theory predicts that speciation-with-gene-flow is more likely when the consequences of selection for population divergence transitions from mainly direct effects of selection acting on individual genes to a collective property of all selected genes in the genome. Thus, understanding the direct impacts of ecologically based selection, as well as the indirect effects due to correlations among loci, is critical to understanding speciation. Here, we measure the genome-wide impacts of host-associated selection between hawthorn and apple...

Data from: Resource quality affects weapon and testis size and the ability of these traits to respond to selection in the leaf-footed cactus bug, Narnia femorata

Daniel A. Sasson, Patricio R. Munoz, Salvador A. Gezan & Christine W. Miller
The size of weapons and testes can be central to male reproductive success. Yet, the expression of these traits is often extremely variable. Studies are needed that take a more complete organism perspective, investigating the sources of variation in both traits simultaneously and using developmental conditions that mimic those in nature. In this study, we investigated the components of variation in weapon and testis sizes using the leaf-footed cactus bug, Narnia femorata (Hemiptera: Coreidae) on...

Data from: A global perspective on Campanulaceae: biogeographic, genomic, and floral evolution

Andrew A. Crowl, Nicholas W. Miles, Clayton J. Visger, Kimberly Hansen, Tina Ayers, Rosemarie Haberle & Nico Cellinese
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: The Campanulaceae are a diverse clade of flowering plants encompassing more than 2300 species in myriad habitats from tropical rainforests to arctic tundra. A robust, multigene phylogeny, including all major lineages, is presented to provide a broad, evolutionary perspective of this cosmopolitan clade. METHODS: We used a phylogenetic framework, in combination with divergence dating, ancestral range estimation, chromosome modeling, and morphological character reconstruction analyses to infer phylogenetic placement and timing of...

Data from: High levels of diversity and population structure in the potato late blight pathogen at the Mexico center of origin

Jianan Wang, Sylvia P. Fernândez-Pavía, Meredith M. Larsen, Edith Garay-Serrano, Rosario Gregorio-Cipriano, Gerardo Rodríguez-Alvarado, Niklaus J. Grünwald & Erica M. Goss
Globally destructive crop pathogens often emerge by migrating out of their native ranges. These pathogens are often diverse at their center of origin, and may exhibit adaptive variation in the invaded range via multiple introductions from different source populations. However, source populations are generally unidentified or poorly studied compared to invasive populations. Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight, is one of the most costly pathogens of potato and tomato worldwide. Mexico is the...

Data from: Impacts of worker density in colony-level aggression, expansion, and survival of the acacia-ant Crematogaster mimosae

Juan Carlos Ruiz Guajardo, Dena L. Grossenbacher, Richard K. Grosberg, Todd M. Palmer, Maureen L. Stanton & Juan Carlos Ruiz-Guajardo
Experimental studies assessing the impact of demographic changes on aggression and inter-group competitive outcomes in communities of social species are rare. This gap in our knowledge is important, not only because social species are foundational elements of many terrestrial ecosystems, but because interference competition among social groups often involves decision-like processes influenced by demographic and environmental contexts. In East Africa, the symbiotic ant Crematogaster mimosae is a co-dominant competitor that engages in high-mortality, intra- and...

Data from: The contribution of dominance to phenotype prediction in a pine breeding and simulated population

Janeo Eustáquio De Almeida Filho, J. F. R. Guimarães, F. F. E Silva, M. D. V. De Resende, P. Muñoz, M. Kirst &
Pedigrees and dense marker panels have been used to predict the genetic merit of individuals in plant and animal breeding, accounting primarily for the contribution of additive effects. However, nonadditive effects may also affect trait variation in many breeding systems, particularly when specific combining ability is explored. Here we used models with different priors, and including additive-only and additive plus dominance effects, to predict polygenic (height) and oligogenic (fusiform rust resistance) traits in a structured...

Data from: Tectonic collision and uplift of Wallacea triggered the global songbird radiation

Robert G. Moyle, Carl H. Oliveros, Michael J. Andersen, Peter A. Hosner, Brett W. Benz, Joseph D. Manthey, Scott L. Travers, Rafe M. Brown & Brant C. Faircloth
Songbirds (oscine passerines) are the most species rich and cosmopolitan bird group, comprising almost half of global avian species diversity. Because of their diversity and ubiquity, songbirds are used extensively in studies of evolutionary ecology, diversification, and ethology. Songbirds originated in Australia, but the evolutionary trajectory from a single species in an isolated continent to worldwide proliferation is poorly understood. Prior research suggested songbird diversification scenarios that are largely uncoupled from Earth history, including extensive...

Data from: Revision of Icacinaceae from the Early Eocene London Clay flora based on X-ray micro-CT

Gregory W. Stull, Neil F. Adams, Steven R. Manchester, Dan Sykes & Margaret E. Collinson
The Early Eocene (Ypresian) London Clay Formation contains one of the most important fruit and seed assemblages from the Paleogene, including a large diversity of taxa (>350 spp.) preserved as pyrite permineralizations retaining 3D structure as well as anatomical detail. Despite the importance of the flora for understanding angiosperm biogeographic and evolutionary history, the majority of the fossil material has not been revisited since the original taxonomic treatments by E.M. Reid and M.E.J. Chandler. Given...

Data from: A new resource for the development of SSR markers: millions of loci from a thousand plant transcriptomes

Richard G. Hodel, Matthew A. Gitzendanner, Charlotte C. Germain-Aubrey, Xiaoxian Liu, Andrew A. Crowl, Miao Sun, Jacob B. Landis, Maria Claudia Segovia-Salcedo, Norman A. Douglas, Shichao Chen, Douglas E. Soltis, Pamela S. Soltis & Richard G. J. Hodel
Premise of the study: The One Thousand Plant Transcriptomes Project (1KP, 1000+ assembled plant transcriptomes) provides an enormous resource for developing microsatellite loci across the plant tree of life. We developed loci from these transcriptomes and tested their utility. Methods and Results: Using software packages and custom scripts, we identified microsatellite loci in 1KP transcriptomes. We assessed the potential for cross-amplification and whether loci were biased toward exons, as compared to markers derived from genomic...

Data from: Effects of 16S rDNA sampling on estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice

Julie M. Allen, J. Gordon Burleigh, Jessica E. Light & David L. Reed
Phylogenetic trees can reveal the origins of endosymbiotic lineages of bacteria and detect patterns of co-evolution with their hosts. Although taxon sampling can greatly affect phylogenetic and co-evolutionary inference, most hypotheses of endosymbiont relationships are based on few available bacterial sequences. Here we examined how different sampling strategies of Gammaproteobacteria sequences affect estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in parasitic sucking lice (Insecta: Phthirapatera: Anoplura). We estimated the number of louse endosymbiont lineages using...

Data from: Mutation is a sufficient and robust predictor of genetic variation for mitotic spindle traits in Caenorhabditis elegans

Reza Farhadifar, Jose Miguel Ponciano, Erik C. Andersen, Daniel J. Needleman & Charles F. Baer
Different types of phenotypic traits consistently exhibit different levels of genetic variation in natural populations. There are two potential explanations: either mutation produces genetic variation at different rates, or natural selection removes or promotes genetic variation at different rates. Whether mutation or selection is of greater general importance is a longstanding unresolved question in evolutionary genetics. We report mutational variances (VM) for 19 traits related to the first mitotic cell division in C. elegans, and...

Data from: Molecular phylogeny, revised higher classification, and implications for conservation of endangered Hawaiian leaf-mining moths (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae: Philodoria)

Chris A. Johns, Matthew R. Moore & Akito Y. Kawahara
The leaf-mining moth genus Philodoria Walsingham (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) is composed of 30 described species, all of which are endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. Philodoria is known to feed on 10 families of endemic Hawaiian host plants, with several species recorded only from threatened or endangered hosts. Beyond their dependence on these plants, little is known of their evolutionary history and conservation status. We constructed a molecular phylogeny of Philodoria to assess validity of its current...

Registration Year

  • 2016
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Florida
    65
  • University of California, Berkeley
    5
  • University of California System
    3
  • Duke University
    3
  • United States Department of Agriculture
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  • California Polytechnic State University
    2
  • University of Kansas
    2
  • University of Washington
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  • Princeton University
    2
  • University of Notre Dame
    2