69 Works

Data from: Head-to-head comparison of three experimental methods of quantifying competitive fitness in C. elegans

Timothy A. Crombie, Sayran Saber, Ayush Shekhar Saxena, Robyn Egan & Charles F. Baer
Organismal fitness is relevant in many contexts in biology. The most meaningful experimental measure of fitness is competitive fitness, when two or more entities (e.g., genotypes) are allowed to compete directly. In theory, competitive fitness is simple to measure: an experimental population is initiated with the different types in known proportions and allowed to evolve under experimental conditions to a predefined endpoint. In practice, there are several obstacles to obtaining robust estimates of competitive fitness...

Data from: The complete mitochondrial genome of the sea urchin, Echinometra sp. EZ

Remi N. Ketchum, Melissa B. DeBiasse, Joseph F. Ryan, John A. Burt & Adam M. Reitzel
The complete mitogenome of Echinometra sp. EZ has been described and fully annotated in this study. Cytochrome subunit one phylogenetic analysis of six Echinometra species confirms that our sample is E. sp. EZ. The mitogenome is 15,698 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs, and a non-coding region with an identical organization to other Echinoidea. The E. sp. EZ mitogenome shared ~99.1% identity to the published Echinometra mathaei mitogenome, differing...

Data from: Phenotypic and transcriptomic responses to salinity stress across genetically and geographically divergent Tigriopus californicus populations

Melissa B. De Biasse, Yasmeen Kawji, Morgan W. Kelly & Melissa B. DeBiasse
Species inhabiting the North American west coast intertidal must tolerate an extremely variable environment, with large fluctuations in both temperature and salinity. Uncovering the mechanisms for this tolerance is key to understanding species’ persistence. We tested for differences in salinity tolerance between populations of Tigriopus californicus copepods from locations in northern (Bodega Reserve) and southern (San Diego) California known to differ in temperature, precipitation, and humidity. We also tested for differences between populations in their...

Data from: A selective fungal transport organ (mycangium) maintains coarse phylogenetic congruence between fungus-farming ambrosia beetles and their symbionts

James Skelton, Andrew J. Johnson, Michelle A. Jusino, Craig C. Bateman, You Li & Jiri Hulcr
Thousands of species of ambrosia beetles excavate tunnels in wood to farm fungi. They maintain associations with particular lineages of fungi, but the phylogenetic extent and mechanisms of fidelity are unknown. We test the hypothesis that selectivity of their mycangium enforces fidelity at coarse phylogenetic scales, while permitting promiscuity among closely related fungal mutualists. We confirm a single evolutionary origin of the Xylosandrus complex – a group of several xyleborine genera that farm fungi in...

Data from: Defaunation and fragmentation erode small mammal diversity dimensions in tropical forests

Ricardo S. Bovendorp, Fernanda T. Brum, Robert A. McCleery, Benjamin Baiser, Rafael Loyola, Marcus V. Cianciaruso & Mauro Galetti
Forest fragmentation and defaunation are considered the main drivers of biodiversity loss, yet the synergistic effects of landscape changes and biotic interactions on assemblage structure have been poorly investigated. Here, we use an extensive dataset of 283 assemblages and 105 species of small mammals to understand how defaunation of medium and large mammals and forest fragmentation change the community composition and diversity of rodents and marsupials in tropical forests of South America. We used structured...

Data from: Irreproducible text-book 'knowledge': the effects of color bands on zebra finch fitness

Daiping Wang, Wolfgang Forstmeier, Malika Ihle, Mehdi Khadraoui, Sofia Jerónimo, Katrin Martin & Bart Kempenaers
Many fields of science currently experience a heated debate about the extent of publication bias against null-findings. Here, we show a case where putatively well-established text-book knowledge cannot be confirmed. Across four decades, zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) studies have reported effects of bands of certain colors on male or female attractiveness and further on behavior, physiology, life-history and fitness. Only 8 out of 39 publications presented exclusively null-findings. Here, we analyze the results of eight...

Data from: Standing geographic variation in eclosion time and the genomics of host race formation in Rhagoletis pomonella fruit flies

Meredith M. Doellman, Scott P. Egan, Gregory J. Ragland, Peter J. Meyers, Glen R. Hood, Thomas H.Q. Powell, Peter Lazorchak, Daniel A. Hahn, Stewart H. Berlocher, Patrik Nosil, Jeff L. Feder, Jeffrey L. Feder & Thomas H. Q. Powell
Taxa harboring high levels of standing variation may be more likely to adapt to rapid environmental shifts and experience ecological speciation. Here, we characterize geographic and host-related differentiation for 10,241 single nucleotide polymorphisms in Rhagoletis pomonella fruit flies to infer if standing genetic variation in adult eclosion time in the ancestral hawthorn (Crataegus spp.)-infesting host race, as opposed to new mutations, contributed substantially to its recent shift to earlier fruiting apple (Malus domestica). Allele frequency...

Data from: Large birds travel farther in homogeneous environments

Marlee A. Tucker, Olga Alexandrou, , Keith L. Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Chloe Bracis, John N. Brzorad, Evan R. Buechley, David Cabot, Justin M. Calabrese, Carlos Carrapato, André Chiaradia, Lisa C. Davenport, Sarah C. Davidson, Mark Desholm, Christopher R. DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Peter Enggist, William F. Fagan, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Christen H. Fleming, Alastair Franke, John M. Fryxell, Clara García-Ripollés … & João Paulo Silva
Aim: Animal movement is an important determinant of individual survival, population dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function. Yet it is still unclear how local movements are related to resource availability and the spatial arrangement of resources. Using resident bird species and migratory bird species outside of the migratory period, we examined how the distribution of resources affect the movement patterns of both large terrestrial birds (e.g., raptors, bustards, hornbills) and waterbirds (e.g., cranes, storks, ducks,...

Data from: Competition and coexistence in plant communities: intraspecific competition is stronger than interspecific competition

Peter B. Adler, Danielle Smull, Karen H. Beard, Ryan T. Choi, Tucker Furniss, Andrew Kulmatiski, Joan M. Meiners, Andrew T. Tredennick & Kari E. Veblen
Theory predicts that intraspecific competition should be stronger than interspecific competition for any pair of stably coexisting species, yet previous literature reviews found little support for this pattern. We screened over 5400 publications and identified 39 studies that quantified phenomenological intraspecific and interspecific interactions in terrestrial plant communities. Of the 67% of species pairs in which both intra- and interspecific effects were negative (competition), intraspecific competition was, on average, four to five-fold stronger than interspecific...

Data from: Risk taking of educated nematodes

Denis S. Willett, Hans T. Alborn, Lukasz L. Stelinski & David I. Shapiro-Ilan
Nematode parasites rely on successful host infection to perpetuate their species. Infection by individual nematode parasites can be risky, however; any one individual could be killed by the host's immune response. Here we use a model system to show that environmental cues and parasite past experience can be used by entomopathogenic nematodes to reduce individual risk of infection. Past parasite experience can more than double the infective virulence (number of host invaders) of a given...

Data from: Terrestrial species adapted to sea dispersal: differences in propagule dispersal of two Caribbean mangroves

Richard G.J. Hodel, L. Lacey Knowles, Stuart F. McDaniel, Adam C. Payton, Jordan F. Dunaway, Pam S. Soltis, Douglas E. Soltis, Richard G. J. Hodel & Pamela S. Soltis
A central goal of comparative phylogeography is to understand how species-specific traits interact with geomorphological history to govern the geographic distribution of genetic variation within species. One key biotic trait with an immense impact on the spatial patterns of intraspecific genetic differentiation is dispersal. Here we quantify how species-specific traits directly related to dispersal affect genetic variation in terrestrial organisms with adaptations for dispersal by sea, not land—the mangroves of the Caribbean. We investigate the...

Data from: Allele phasing has minimal impact on phylogenetic reconstruction from targeted nuclear gene sequences in a case study of Artocarpus

Heather Rose Kates, Matthew G. Johnson, Elliot M. Gardner, Nyree J.C. Zerega, Norman J. Wickett & Nyree J. C. Zerega
Premise of the study: Untapped information about allelic diversity within populations and individuals (i.e. heterozygosity) could improve phylogenetic resolution and accuracy. Many phylogenetic reconstructions ignore heterozygosity because it is difficult to assemble allele sequences and combine allelic data across unlinked loci and it is unclear how reconstruction methods accommodate variable sequences. We review the common methods of including heterozygosity in phylogenetic studies and present a novel method for assembling allele sequences from target enriched Illumina...

Data from: Impacts of inference method and dataset filtering on phylogenomic resolution in a rapid radiation of ground squirrels (Xerinae: Marmotini)

Bryan S. McLean, Kayce C. Bell, Julia M. Allen, Kristofer M. Helgen, Joseph A. Cook & Julie M Allen
Phylogenomic datasets are illuminating many areas of the Tree of Life. However, the large size of these datasets alone may be insufficient to resolve problematic nodes in the most rapid evolutionary radiations, because inferences in zones of extraordinarily low phylogenetic signal can be sensitive to the model and method of inference, as well as the information content of loci employed. We used a dataset of >3,950 ultraconserved element (UCE) loci from a classic mammalian radiation,...

Data from: Globally consistent impact of tropical cyclones on the structure of tropical and subtropical forests

Thomas Ibanez, Gunnar Keppel, Christophe Menkes, Thomas W. Gillespie, Matthieu Lengaigne, Morgan Mangeas, Gonzalo Rivas-Torres & Philippe Birnbaum
1. Tropical cyclones (TCs) are large-scale disturbances that regularly impact tropical forests. Although long-term impacts of TCs on forest structure have been proposed, a global test of the relationship between forest structure and TC frequency and intensity is lacking. We test on a pantropical scale whether TCs shape the structure of tropical and subtropical forests in the long-term. 2. We compiled forest structural features (stem density, basal area, mean canopy height and maximum tree size)...

Data from: Odor alters color preference in a foraging jumping spider

Michael E. Vickers & Lisa A. Taylor
In many prey taxa with aposematic coloration, prey defenses also involve signals in other modalities (odors, sounds, etc.), yet the selective forces that have driven multimodality in warning displays are not well understood. One potential hypothesis that has recently received support in the avian literature (but has yet to be examined in invertebrates) is that different signal components may interact synergistically, such that one component of a signal (odor) may trigger a predator’s aversion to...

Data from: Collective aggressiveness of an ecosystem engineer is associated with coral recovery

Jonathan N. Pruitt, Carl N. Keiser, Brett T. Banka, John S. Liedle, Andrew J. Brooks, Russ J. Schmitt & Sally J. Holbrook
The ecological impacts of animal groups may be different and predictable depending on their collective behavior. Farmerfish (Stegastes nigricans) live in social groups and collectively defend gardens of palatable algae. These gardens also serve as settlement and nursery habitats for corals because farmerfish mob corallivores that attempt to forage on corals within their gardens. We detected large among-colony differences in farmerfish collective aggression towards intruder fish that persist across years. We further found that the...

Data from: Temperature drives Zika virus transmission: evidence from empirical and mathematical models

Blanka Tesla, Leah Demakovsky, Erin Mordecai, Sadie Ryan, Matthew Bonds, Calistus Ngonghala, Melinda Brindley & Courtney Murdock
Temperature is a strong driver of vector-borne disease transmission. Yet, for emerging arboviruses we lack fundamental knowledge on the relationship between transmission and temperature. Current models rely on the untested assumption that Zika virus responds similarly to dengue virus, potentially limiting our ability to accurately predict the spread of Zika. We conducted experiments to estimate the thermal performance of Zika virus (ZIKV) in field-derived Aedes aegypti across eight constant temperatures. We observed strong, unimodal effects...

Data from: The evolution of anti-bat sensory illusions in moths

Juliette J. Rubin, Chris A. Hamilton, Chris J. W. McClure, Brad A. Chadwell, Akito Y. Kawahara & Jesse R. Barber
Prey transmit sensory illusions to redirect predatory strikes, creating a discrepancy between what a predator perceives and reality. We use the acoustic arms race between bats and moths to investigate the evolution and function of a sensory illusion. The spinning hindwing tails of silk moths (Saturniidae) divert bat attack by reflecting sonar to create a misleading echoic target. We characterized geometric morphometrics of moth hindwings across silk moths, mapped these traits onto a new, robust...

Data from: Rapid evolution and the genomic consequences of selection against interspecific mating

Martha O. Burford Reiskind, Paul Labadie, Irka Bargielowski, L. Philip Lounibos & Michael H. Reiskind
While few species introduced into a new environment become invasive, those that do provide critical information on ecological mechanisms that determine invasions success and the evolutionary responses that follow invasion. Aedes albopictus (the Asian tiger mosquito) was introduced into the naturalized range of Aedes aegypti (the yellow fever mosquito) in the USA in the mid-1980s, resulting in the displacement of A. aegypti in much of the southeastern USA. The rapid displacement was likely due to...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    69

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    68
  • Text
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Affiliations

  • University of Florida
    69
  • University of Georgia
    4
  • Michigan State University
    4
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    3
  • Florida Museum of Natural History
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • University of Montana
    2
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • Rice University
    2
  • Stanford University
    2