56 Works

Data from: A new ancient lineage of frog (Anura: Nyctibatrachidae: Astrobatrachinae subfam. nov.) endemic to the Western Ghats of Peninsular India

Seenapuram Palaniswamy Vijayakumar, Robert Alexander Pyron, K. P. Dinesh, Varun R. Torsekar, Achyuthan N. Srikanthan, Priyanka Swamy, Edward L. Stanley, David C. Blackburn & Kartik Shanker
The Western Ghats (WG) is an escarpment on the west coast of Peninsular India, housing one of the richest assemblages of frogs in the world, with three endemic families. Here, we report the discovery of a new ancient lineage from a high-elevation massif in the Wayanad Plateau of the southern WG. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that the lineage belongs to Natatanura and clusters with Nyctibatrachidae, a family endemic to the WG/Sri Lanka biodiversity hotspot. Based on...

Data from: Patterns of nitrogen-fixing tree abundance in forests across Asia and America

Duncan N. L. Menge, Ryan A. Chisholm, Stuart J. Davies, Kamariah Abu Salim, David Allen, Mauricio Alvarez, Norm Bourg, Warren Y. Brockelman, Sarayudh Bunyavejchewin, Nathalie Butt, Min Cao, Wirong Chanthorn, Wei-Chun Chao, Keith Clay, Richard Condit, Susan Cordell, João Batista Da Silva, H. S. Dattaraja, Ana Cristina Segalin De Andrade, Alexandre A. Oliveira, Jan Den Ouden, Michael Drescher, Christine Fletcher, Christian P. Giardina, C. V. Savitri Gunatilleke … & Tak Fung
Symbiotic nitrogen (N)‐fixing trees can provide large quantities of new N to ecosystems, but only if they are sufficiently abundant. The overall abundance and latitudinal abundance distributions of N‐fixing trees are well characterised in the Americas, but less well outside the Americas. Here, we characterised the abundance of N‐fixing trees in a network of forest plots spanning five continents, ~5,000 tree species and ~4 million trees. The majority of the plots (86%) were in America...

Altered Gut Microbiome Profile in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Seungbum Kim
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is considered a disease of the pulmonary vasculature. Limited progress has been made in preventing or arresting progression of PAH despite extensive efforts. Our previous studies indicated that PAH could be considered a systemic disease since its pathology involves interplay of multiple organs. This, coupled with increasing implication of the gut and its microbiome in chronic diseases, led us to hypothesize that PAH patients exhibit a distinct gut microbiome that contributes...

Optimizing Coastal Restoration with the Stress Gradient Hypothesis

Hallie S Fischman, Sinead M Crotty & Christine Angelini
Restoration efforts have been escalating worldwide in response to widespread habitat degradation. However, coastal restoration attempts notoriously vary in their ability to establish resilient, high-functioning ecosystems. Conventional restoration attempts disperse transplants in competition-minimizing arrays, yet recent studies suggest that clumping transplants to maximize facilitative interactions may improve restoration success. Here, we modify the Stress Gradient Hypothesis to generate predictions about where each restoration design will perform best across environmental stress gradients. We then test this...

Data from: Preserved collagen reveals species identity in archaeological marine turtle bones from Caribbean and Florida sites

Michael Buckley, Virginia L. Harvey, Michelle J. LeFebvre, Susan D. DeFrance, Casper Toftgaard & Andrew C. Kitchener
Advancements in molecular science are continually improving our understanding of marine turtle biology and evolution. However, there are still considerable gaps in our understanding, such as past marine turtle distributions, which can benefit from advanced zooarchaeological analyses. Here we apply collagen fingerprinting to 130 archaeological marine turtle bone samples up to 2500 years old from the Caribbean and Florida’s Gulf Coast for faunal identification, finding the vast majority of samples (88%) to contain preserved collagen...

Data from: Natural selection and repeated patterns of molecular evolution following allopatric divergence

Yibo Dong, Shichao Chen, Shifeng Cheng, Wenbin Zhou, Qing Ma, Zhiduan Chen, Cheng-Xin Fu, Xin Liu, Yun-Peng Zhao, Pamela S. Soltis, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, Douglas E. Soltis & Jenny Xiang
Background: Geographic speciation is a major force in generating biodiversity. However, how genomes diverge over time after geographic isolation has halted gene flow has remained unclear. We examine genome-wide divergence of putatively single-copy orthologous genes (POGs) from transcriptomes in 20 allopatric species/variety pairs from diverse angiosperm clades. Sixteen of these pairs reflect the well-known eastern Asia – eastern North America floristic disjunction; these species have been isolated for different lengths of time, from the Miocene...

Data from: Snail herbivory affects seedling establishment in a temperate forest in the Ozark region

Anna J. Liang, Claudia Stein, Eleanor Pearson, Jonathan A. Myers, Raelene M. Crandall & Scott A. Mangan
1. Species-specific herbivores are hypothesized to maintain plant diversity by preventing the dominance of any one plant species. However, a large proportion of herbivores have wide host ranges, and these generalists could have similar effects on plant community composition if they exhibit differences in their host preference. Here, we coupled lab and field experiments to test whether a common forest-understory snail (Neohelix alleni), a generalist herbivore, has the potential to influence forest composition through differential...

Data from: Cardiac and skeletal muscle effects in the randomized HOPE-Duchenne trial

Michael Taylor, John Jefferies, Barry Byrne, Joao Lima, Bharath Ambale-Venkatesh, Mohammad R. Ostovaneh, Raj Makkar, Bryan Goldstein, Rachel Ruckdeschel Smith, James Fudge, Konstantinos Malliaras, Brian Fedor, Jeff Rudy, Janice M. Pogoda, Linda Marbán, Deborah D. Ascheim, Eduardo Marbán & Ronald G. Victor
Objective: To assess the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of intracoronary allogeneic cardiosphere-derived cells (CAP-1002) in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods: The Halt Cardiomyopathy Progression (HOPE)-Duchenne trial is a phase I/II, randomized, controlled, open-label trial (NCT02485938). Patients with DMD >12 years old, with substantial myocardial fibrosis, were randomized (1:1) to usual care (control) or global intracoronary infusion of CAP-1002 (75 million cells). Participants were enrolled at 3 US medical centers between January and August...

Data from: Interaction among ploidy, breeding system, and lineage diversification

Rosana Zenil-Ferguson, J. Gordon Burleigh, William A. Freyman, Boris Igic, Itay Mayrose & Emma E. Goldberg
If particular traits consistently affect rates of speciation and extinction, broad macroevolutionary patterns can be interpreted as consequences of selection at high levels of the biological hierarchy. Identifying traits associated with diversification rates is difficult because of the wide variety of characters under consideration and the statistical challenges of testing for associations from comparative phylogenetic data. Ploidy (diploid vs. polyploid states) and breeding system (self-incompatible vs. self-compatible states) are both thought to be drivers of...

Populations of a widespread invader and co-occurring native species vary in phenotypic plasticity

Drew Hiatt & Luke Flory
Phenotypic plasticity can promote plant invasions and enhance impacts on native species but little is known about variation in plasticity among invader populations compared to native species. Variation in plasticity among invader populations could inform more precise predictions of invader spread and impacts across heterogeneous resource environments. We used a common garden experiment with sun and shade treatments to test for variation in plasticity among 12 populations of an invasive grass, and to determine if...

Data from: Allocation of invasive plant management expenditures for conservation: lessons from Florida, USA

Drew Hiatt, Kristina Serbesoff-King, Deah Lieurance, Doria R. Gordon & S. Luke Flory
Although the ecological impacts of biological invasions are well studied, comprehensive analyses of spending on invasive species management are lacking. Such analyses could inform both effective resource allocation and management planning. We evaluated long-term invasive plant management expenditures and their potential geographic, economic, and ecological drivers for freshwater and terrestrial conservation areas in Florida, USA. Average expenditures for managing invaders were approximately US$45M annually, with over 90% of funding provided by the state. Our model...

Data from: Effects of taxon sampling and tree reconstruction methods on phylodiversity metrics

Johanna Jantzen, W. Mark Whitten, Kurt Neubig, Lucas Majure, Douglas Soltis & Pam Soltis
1. The amount and patterns of phylodiversity in a community are often used to draw inferences about the local and historical factors affecting community assembly and can be used to prioritize communities and locations for conservation. Because measures of phylodiversity are based on the topology and branch lengths of phylogenetic trees, which are affected by the number and diversity of taxa in the tree, these analyses may be sensitive to changes in taxon sampling and...

Data from: The biotic interactions hypothesis partially explains bird species turnover along a lowland Neotropical precipitation gradient

Juan Pablo Gomez, Jose Miguel Ponciano, Gustavo Londoño & Scott Robinson
Aim: We evaluated the influence of climate in determining bird communities along precipitation gradients. We argue that mechanisms responsible for community turnover along precipitation gradients are similar to mechanisms operating along temperature and latitudinal gradients. We test the hypothesis that environmental conditions affect community composition in dry forests, whereas biotic interactions affect community composition in wet forests. Location: Low-elevation forests along a precipitation gradient in Colombia where precipitation ranges from 700 – 4000 mm annually...

Data from: Genomics overrules mitochondrial DNA, siding with morphology on a controversial case of species delimitation

Carmen R. Del Pedraza-Marrón, Raimundo Silva, Jonathan Deeds, Steven M. Van Belleghem, Alicia Mastretta-Yanes, Omar Domínguez-Domínguez, Rafael A. Rivero-Vega, Loretta Lutackas, Debra Murie, Daryl Parkyn, Lewis H. Bullock, Kristin Foss, Humberto Ortiz-Zuazaga, Juan Narváez-Barandica, Arturo Acero, Grazielle Gomes & Ricardo Betancur-R.
Species delimitation is a major quest in biology and is essential for adequate management of the organismal diversity. A challenging example comprises the fish species of red snappers in the Western Atlantic. Red snappers have been traditionally recognized as two separate species based on morphology: Lutjanus campechanus (northern red snapper) and L. purpureus (southern red snappers). Recent genetic studies using mitochondrial markers, however, failed to delineate these nominal species, leading to the current lumping of...

Assessing seasonal demographic covariation to understand environmental-change impacts on a hibernating mammal

Maria Paniw, Dylan Childs, Kenneth Armitage, Daniel Blumstein, Julien Martin, Madan Oli & Arpat Ozgul
Natural populations are exposed to seasonal variation in environmental factors that simultaneously affect several demographic rates (survival, development, reproduction). The resulting covariation in these rates determines population dynamics, but accounting for its numerous biotic and abiotic drivers is a significant challenge. Here, we use a factor-analytic approach to capture partially unobserved drivers of seasonal population dynamics. We use 40 years of individual-based demography from yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventer) to fit and project population models that...

Data from: Phylogenomics reveals the evolutionary timing and pattern of butterflies and moths

Akito Y. Kawahara, David Plotkin, Marianne Espeland, Karen Meusemann, Emmanuel F. A. Toussaint, Alexander Donath, France Gimnich, Paul B. Frandsen, Andreas Zwick, Mario Dos Reis, Jesse R. Barber, Ralph S. Peters, Shanlin Liu, Xin Zhou, Christoph Mayer, Lars Podsiadlowski, Caroline Storer, Jayne E. Yack, Bernhard Misof & Jesse W. Breinholt
Butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) are one of the major super-radiations of insects, comprising nearly 160,000 described extant species. As herbivores, pollinators, and prey, Lepidoptera play a fundamental role in almost every terrestrial ecosystem. Lepidoptera are also indicators of environmental change and serve as model organisms for research on mimicry and genetics. They have been central to the development of co-evolutionary hypotheses, such as butterflies with flowering plants, and moths' evolutionary arms race with echolocating bats....

Data from: samc: An R package for connectivity modeling with spatial absorbing Markov chains

Andrew Marx, Chao Wang, Jorge Sefair, Miguel Acevedo & Robert Fletcher
Quantifying landscape connectivity is fundamental to better understand and predict how populations respond to environmental change. Currently, popular methods to quantify landscape connectivity emphasize how landscape features provide resistance to movement. While many tools are available to quantify landscape resistance, these do not discern between two fundamentally different sources of resistance: movement behavior and mortality. To address this issue, we developed the samc package that quantifies landscape connectivity using absorbing Markov chain theory. Within this...

Data from: Higher-level phylogeny and reclassification of Lampyridae (Coleoptera: Elateroidea)

Gavin Martin, Kathrin Stanger-Hall, Marc Branham, Luiz Da Silveira, Sarah Lower, David Hall, Xue-Yan Li, Alan Lemmon, Emily Lemmon & Seth Bybee
Fireflies (Lampyridae) are a diverse family of beetles which exhibit an array of morphologies including varying antennal and photic organ morphologies. Due in part to their morphological diversity, the classification within the Lampyridae has long been in flux. Here we use an anchored hybrid enrichment approach to reconstruct the most extensive molecular phylogeny of Lampyridae to date (436 loci and 98 taxa) and to evaluate firefly higher-level classification. We propose several classification changes supported by...

The biotic interactions hypothesis partially explains bird species turnover along a lowland Neotropical precipitation gradient

Juan Pablo Gomez, Jose Ponciano, Gusatvo Londoño & Scott Robinson
Aim We evaluated the influence of climate in determining bird communities along precipitation gradients. We argue that mechanisms responsible for community turnover along precipitation gradients are similar to mechanisms operating along temperature and latitudinal gradients. We test the hypothesis that environmental conditions affect community composition in dry forests, whereas biotic interactions affect community composition in wet forests. Location Low-elevation forests along a precipitation gradient in Colombia where precipitation ranges from 700 – 4000 mm annually...

Data from: Predator-induced collapse of niche structure and coexistence on islands

Robert M. Pringle, Tyler R. Kartzinel, Todd M. Palmer, Timothy J. Thurman, Kena Fox-Dobbs, Charles C. Y. Xu, Matthew C. Hutchinson, Tyler C. Coverdale, Joshua H. Daskin, Dominic A. Evangelista, Kiyoko M. Gotanda, , Johanna E. Wegener, Jason J. Kolbe, Thomas W. Schoener, David A. Spiller, Jonathan B. Losos & Rowan D. H. Barrett
Biological invasions represent both a pressing environmental challenge and an opportunity to investigate fundamental ecological processes, such as the role of top predators in regulating species diversity and food-web structure. In whole-ecosystem manipulations of small Caribbean islands where brown anole lizards (Anolis sagrei) were the native top predator, we experimentally staged invasions by competitors (green anoles, A. smaragdinus) and/or novel top predators (curly-tailed lizards, Leiocephalus carinatus). We show that curly-tails destabilized coexistence of competing prey...

Data from: The role of male coloration and ornamentation in potential alternative mating strategies of the dimorphic jumping spider, Maevia inclemens

Laurel B. Lietzenmayer, David L. Clark & Lisa A. Taylor
Polymorphism can arise across taxa due to various selection pressures and potentially lead to alternative mating or antipredator strategies. For male jumping spiders, sexual selection and predation risk are often intertwined when courting cannibalistic females and may be a driving factor in the polymorphism of the jumping spider, Maevia inclemens. The dimorphic males of M. inclemens differ dramatically in their complex courtship behavior and display traits that may function as alternative mating strategies to reduce...

Data from: Do riparian forest strips in modified forest landscapes aid in conserving bat diversity?

Farah Carrasco-Rueda & Bette A. Loiselle
Agricultural practices lead to losses of natural resources and biodiversity. Maintaining forests alongside streams (riparian forest strips) has been used as a mechanism to minimize the impact of clearing for agriculture on biodiversity. To test the contribution of riparian forest strips to conserve biodiversity in production landscapes, we selected bats as a biodiversity model system and examined two dimensions of diversity: taxonomic and functional. We compared bat diversity and composition in forest, with and without...

Data from: Urbanization drives unique latitudinal patterns of insect herbivory and tree condition

Michael G. Just, Adam G. Dale, Lawrence C. Long & Steven D. Frank
Urban landscapes are characterized by high proportions of impervious surface resulting in higher temperatures than adjacent natural landscapes. In some cities, like those at cooler latitudes, trees may benefit from warmer urban temperatures, but trees in many cities are beset with problems like drought stress and increased herbivory. What drives patterns of urban tree health across urbanization and latitudinal temperature gradients? In natural systems, latitude-herbivory relationships are well-studied, and recent temperate studies have shown that...

Data Management and the Role of Librarians

Plato L. Smith II, PhD, Sara Gonzalez & Jean Bossart
‘Research Data Science’ is defined by Committee on Data of the International Council for Science Research Data Alliance (CODATA-RDA) as an ensemble of (a) Open Science principles and practices (FAIR) and research data management and curation skills, (b) the use of a range of data platforms and infrastructures, (c) large scale analysis, (d) statistics, (e)visualization and modeling techniques, (f) software development and annotation, and (g)more. Data management and the role of librarians must now include...

Developing, linking, and providing access to supplemental genetics dataset vcf files

Plato Smith & Lauren McIntyre

Registration Year

  • 2019
    56

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    54
  • Text
    2

Affiliations

  • University of Florida
    56
  • University of Georgia
    5
  • Florida Museum of Natural History
    4
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    4
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    3
  • Washington University in St. Louis
    3
  • University of Kansas
    2
  • Virginia Tech
    2
  • Icesi University
    2