150 Works

Data from: Conquering the world in leaps and bounds: hopping locomotion in toads is actually bounding

Stephen M. Reilly, Stephane J. Montuelle, Andre Schmidt, Emily Naylor, Michael E. Jorgensen, Lewis G. Halsey, & Richard L. Essner
1.While most frogs maximize jump distance as an escape behavior, toads have traded jump distance for endurance with a strategy of hopping repeatedly. This strategy has enabled toads to expand across the continents as one of the most diverse groups of anurans. Multiple studies have revealed physiological endurance adaptations for sustained hopping in toads, however, the kinematics of their sequential hopping behavior, per se, has not been studied. 2.We compared kinematics and forces of single...

Data from: Biodiversity comparison among phylogenetic diversity metrics and between three North American prairies

P. Roxanne Steele Kellar, Dakota L. Ahrendsen, Shelly K. Aust, Amanda R. Jones, J. Chris Pires &
Protection of Earth's ecosystems requires identification of geographical areas of greatest biodiversity. Assessment of biodiversity begins with knowledge of the evolutionary histories of species in a geographic area. Multiple phylogenetic diversity (PD) metrics have been developed to describe biodiversity beyond species counts, but sufficient empirical studies, particularly at fine phylogenetic scales, have not been conducted to provide conservation planners with evidence for incorporating PD metrics into selection of priority regions. We review notable studies that...

Data from: Phylogeny, classification, and fruit evolution of the species-rich Neotropical bellflowers (Campanulaceae: Lobelioideae)

Laura P. Lagomarsino, Alexandre Antonelli, Nathan Muchhala, Allan Timmermann, Sarah Mathews & Charles C. Davis
Premise of the study: The species-rich Neotropical genera Centropogon, Burmeistera, and Siphocampylus represent more than half of the ∼1200 species in the subfamily Lobelioideae (Campanulaceae). They exhibit remarkable morphological variation in floral morphology and habit. Limited taxon sampling and phylogenetic resolution, however, obscures our understanding of relationships between and within these genera and underscores our uncertainty of the systematic value of fruit type as a major diagnostic character. Methods: We inferred a phylogeny from five...

Data from: The genomes of two key bumblebee species with primitive eusocial organisation

Ben M. Sadd, Seth M. Barribeau, Guy Bloch, Dirk C. De Graaf, Peter Dearden, Christine Elsik, Jurgen Gadau, Cornelius Grimmelikhuijzen, Martin Hasselmann, Jeffrey Lozier, Hugh Robertson, Guy Smagghe, Eckart Stolle, Matthias Van Vaerenbergh, Robert Waterhouse, Erich Bornberg-Bauer, Steffan Klasberg, Anna Bennett, Francisco Camara, Roderic Guigo, Katharina Hoff, Marco Mariotti, Monica Munos-Torres, Terence Murphy, Didac Santesmasses … & Kim C. Worley
Background: The shift from solitary to social behavior is one of the major evolutionary transitions. Primitively eusocial bumblebees are uniquely placed to illuminate the evolution of highly eusocial insect societies. Bumblebees are also invaluable natural and agricultural pollinators, and there is widespread concern over recent population declines in some species. High-quality genomic data will inform key aspects of bumblebee biology, including susceptibility to implicated population viability threats. Results: We report the high quality draft genome...

Data from: Does body size predict the buzz-pollination frequencies used by bees?

Paul A De Luca, Stephen L Buchmann, Candace Galen, Andrew C Mason & Mario Vallejo-Marín
Body size is an important trait linking pollinators and plants. Morphological matching between pollinators and plants is thought to reinforce pollinator fidelity, as the correct fit ensures that both parties benefit from the interaction. We investigated the influence of body size in a specialized pollination system (buzz‐pollination) where bees vibrate flowers to release pollen concealed within poricidal stamens. Specifically, we explored how body size influences the frequency of buzz‐pollination vibrations. Body size is expected to...

Data from: Negative effects of vertebrate on invertebrate herbivores mediated by enhanced plant nitrogen content

Yu Zhu, Zhiwei Zhong, Jordi Pagès, Deborah Finke, Deli Wang, Quanhui Ma, Nazim Hassan, Zhu Hui, Ling Wang & Hui Zhu
1. Classic theory holds that the main interaction within the herbivore guild is competition, based on research focused on co-occurring, similarly-sized species that reduce the quantity of shared plant resources. However, plant quality may also be crucial in mediating herbivore interspecific interactions. This is especially true when competition occurs between distantly-related herbivore species, given that small terrestrial herbivores (e.g. insect herbivores) appear to be more sensitive to alterations of plant quality than plant quantity. 2....

Leaf vibrations produced by chewing provide a consistent acoustic target for plant recognition of herbivores

Reginald Cocroft & Alexis Kollasch
Plant defenses that respond to the threat of herbivory require accurate sensing of the presence of herbivores. Herbivory cues include mechanical damage, elicitors from insect saliva or eggs, and airborne volatiles emitted by wounded plants. Plants can also respond to the leaf vibrations produced by chewing herbivores. However, previous studies of the influence of feeding vibrations on plant defenses have been limited to single species pairs. In this study we test the hypothesis that chewing...

Data from: Stranger than a scorpion: a reassessment of Parioscorpio venator, a problematic arthropod from the Llandoverian Waukesha Lagerstätte

Evan Anderson, James Schiffbauer, Sarah Jacquet, James Lamsdell, Joanne Kluessendorf & Donald Mikulic
A relatively uncommon arthropod of the Waukesha lagerstätte, Parioscorpio venator, is redescribed as an arthropod bearing a combination of characters that defy ready classification. Diagnostic features include sub-chelate ‘great appendages’, a lack of antennae, multiramous anterior trunk appendages, filamentous fan-like rear trunk appendages, and apparently thin and poorly preserved pleural fields. Phylogenetic analysis resolves this organism as basal to crown-group Mandibulata and Chelicerata, but its exact placement is inconclusive. Thus, we compare its morphology to...

Northern Bobwhite juvenile survival southwest Missouri 2016-2018

Emily Sinnott, Frank Thompson, Mitch Weegman & Thomas Thompson
These data and code are associated with the publication in Ornithological Applications entitled "Northern Bobwhite juvenile survival is greater on native grasslands managed with fire and grazing, and lower in non-native field borders and strip crop fields." We evaluated the influence of brood age, vegetation cover type, woody vegetation structure, habitat management, and landscape cover on juvenile survival in southwest Missouri 2016-2018.

The complex history of genome duplication and hybridization in North American gray treefrogs

William W. Booker, H. Carl Gerhardt, Alan R. Lemmon, Margaret Ptacek, Alyssa T. B. Hassinger, Johannes Schul & Emily M. Lemmon
Polyploid speciation has played an important role in evolutionary history across the tree of life, yet there remain large gaps in our understanding of how polyploid species form and persist. While systematic studies have been conducted in numerous polyploid complexes, recent advances in sequencing technology have demonstrated that conclusions from data-limited studies may be spurious and misleading. The North American gray treefrog complex, consisting of the diploid Hyla chrysoscelis and the tetraploid Hyla versicolor, has...

Active modification of cavity nest-entrances is a common strategy in arboreal ants

Flávio Camarota, Galen V. Priest, Flávio Camarota, Heraldo Vasconcelos, Scott Powell & Robert J. Marquis.
The majority of tropical arboreal ant species nest in tree cavities. These cavities, often produced initially by wood-boring beetles, can be in live or dead wood and represent long-lasting and highly defensible nesting resources. Yet the size of cavity entrances can constrain their use. Active entrance modification may be an effective way to overcome this constraint. Here, we conduct the first systematic study of nest-entrance modification in an arboreal ant community. Using field experiments deployed...

Data from: Molecular square dancing in CO-CO collisions

ZhongFa Sun, David H. Parker, Marc C. Van Hemert, Jérôme Loreau, Ad Van Der Avoird & Arthur G. Suits
Knowledge of rotational energy transfer (RET) involving carbon monoxide (CO) molecules is crucial for the interpretation of astrophysical data. As of now, our nearly perfect understanding of atom-molecule scattering shows that RET usually occurs by only a simple “bump” between partners. To advance molecular dynamics to the next step in complexity, we studied molecule-molecule scattering in great detail for collision between two CO molecules. Using advanced imaging methods and quasi-classical and fully quantum theory, we...

Data from: Human endometrial transcriptome and progesterone receptor cistrome reveal important pathways and epithelial regulators

Ru-Pin Alicia Chi, Tianyuan Wang, Nyssa Adams, San-Pin Wu, Steven Young, Thomas Spencer & Francesco DeMayo
Context. Poor uterine receptivity is one major factor leading to pregnancy loss and infertility. Understanding the molecular events governing successful implantation is hence critical in combating infertility. Objective. To define PGR-regulated molecular mechanisms and epithelial roles in receptivity. Design. RNA-seq and PGR-ChIP-seq were conducted in parallel to identify PGR-regulated pathways during the WOI in endometrium of fertile women. Setting. Endometrial biopsies from the proliferative and mid-secretory phases were analyzed. Patients or Other Participants. Participants were...

Data from: Trait plasticity alters the range of possible coexistence conditions in a competition-colonization trade-off

Ranjan Muthukrishnan, Lauren L. Sullivan, Allison Shaw & James Forester
Most of the classical theory on species coexistence has been based on species-level competitive trade-offs. However, it is becoming apparent that plant species display high levels of trait plasticity. The implications of this plasticity are almost completely unknown for most coexistence theory. Here, we model a competition-colonization trade-off and incorporate trait plasticity to evaluate its effects on coexistence. Our simulations show that the classic competition-colonization trade-off is highly sensitive to environmental circumstances and coexistence only...

Can sensory drive explain the evolution of visual signal diversity in terrestrial species? A test with Anolis lizards

Leo Fleishman, Christian Perez-Martinez & Manuel Leal
Animal signal colors evolve to efficiently stimulate conspecific visual systems. The sensory drive hypothesis proposes that species differences in habitat light conditions favor the evolution of color diversity. The strongest support comes from aquatic systems, while terrestrial systems offer fewer convincing examples. Anolis lizards occupy diverse habitats and signal with a colorful dewlap. Dewlap visibility depends on perceived chromatic contrast with the background. Visual-system modeling has shown that red dewlaps are most visible in most...

PRMI: A dataset of minirhizotron images for diverse plant root study

Weihuang Xu, Guohao Yu, Yiming Cui, Romain Gloaguen, Alina Zare, Jason Bonnette, Joel Reyes-Cabrera, Ashish Rajurkar, Diane Rowland, Roser Matamala, Julie D. Jastrow, Thomas E. Juenger & Felix B. Fritschi
Understanding a plant's root system architecture (RSA) is crucial for a variety of plant science problem domains including sustainability and climate adaptation. Minirhizotron (MR) technology is a widely-used approach for phenotyping RSA non-destructively by capturing root imagery over time. Precisely segmenting roots from the soil in MR imagery is a critical step in studying RSA features. In this paper, we introduce a large-scale dataset of plant root images captured by MR technology. In total, there...

Data from: Environmental gradients and the evolution of successional habitat specialization: a test case with 14 Neotropical forest sites

Susan G. Letcher, Jesse R. Lasky, Robin L. Chazdon, Natalia Norden, S. Joseph Wright, Jorge A. Meave, Eduardo A. Pérez-García, Rodrigo Muñoz, Eunice Romero-Pérez, Ana Andrade, José Luis Andrade, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Tony V. Bentos, Radika Bhaskar, Frans Bongers, Vanessa Boukili, Pedro H. S. Brancalion, Ricardo G. César, Deborah A. Clark, David B. Clark, Dylan Craven, Alexander DeFrancesco, Juan M. Dupuy, Bryan Finegan … & G. Bruce Williamson
1. Successional gradients are ubiquitous in nature, yet few studies have systematically examined the evolutionary origins of taxa that specialize at different successional stages. Here we quantify successional habitat specialization in Neotropical forest trees and evaluate its evolutionary lability along a precipitation gradient. Theoretically, successional habitat specialization should be more evolutionarily conserved in wet forests than in dry forests due to more extreme microenvironmental differentiation between early and late successional stages in wet forest. 2....

Data from: Exploitation of interspecific diversity for monocot crop improvement

Julie King, Ian Armstead, John Harper, Luke Ramsay, John Snape, Robbie Waugh, Caron James, Ann Thomas, Dagmara Gasior, Rhys Kelly, Luned Roberts, Perry Gustafson, Ian King & L Ramsey
In many cultivated crop species there is limited genetic variation available for the development of new higher yielding varieties adapted to climate change and sustainable farming practises. The distant relatives of crop species provide a vast and largely untapped reservoir of genetic variation for a wide range of agronomically important traits that can be exploited by breeders for crop improvement. In this paper, in what we believe to be the largest introgression programme undertaken in...

Data from: Evolutionary relationships, cospeciation, and host switching in avian malaria parasites

Robert E. Ricklefs, Sylvia M. Fallon & Eldredge Bermingham
We used phylogenetic analyses of cytochrome b sequences of malaria parasites and their avian hosts to assess the coevolutionary relationships between host and parasite lineages. Many lineages of avian malaria parasites have broad host distributions, which tend to obscure cospeciation events. The hosts of a single parasite or of closely related parasites were nonetheless most frequently recovered from members of the same host taxonomic family, more so than expected by chance. However, global assessments of...

Data from: Brassicales phylogeny inferred from 72 plastid genes: a reanalysis of the phylogenetic localization of two paleopolyploid events and origin of novel chemical defenses

Patrick P. Edger, Jocelyn C. Hall, Alex Harkess, Michelle Tang, Jill Coombs, Setareh Mohammadin, M. Eric Schranz, Zhiyong Xiong, James Leebens-Mack, Blake C. Meyers, Kenneth J. Systma, Marcus A. Koch, Ihsan A. Al-Shehbaz, J. Chris Pires & Kenneth J. Sytsma
PREMISE OF THE STUDY - Previous phylogenetic studies employing molecular markers have yielded various insights into the evolutionary history across Brassicales, but many relationships between families remain poorly supported or unresolved. A recent phylotranscriptomic approach utilizing 1155 nuclear markers obtained robust estimates for relationships among 14 of 17 families. Here we report a complete family‐level phylogeny estimated using the plastid genome. METHODS - We conducted phylogenetic analyses on a concatenated data set comprising 44,926 bp...

Data from: Molecular resources from transcriptomes in the Brassicaceae family

Lua Lopez, Eva M. Wolf, J. Chris Pires, Patrick P. Edger & Marcus A. Koch
The rapidly falling costs and the increasing availability of large DNA sequence data sets facilitate the fast and affordable mining of large molecular markers data sets for comprehensive evolutionary studies. The Brassicaceae (mustards) are an important species-rich family in the plant kingdom with taxa distributed worldwide and a complex evolutionary history. We performed Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) mining using de novo assembled transcriptomes from 19 species across the Brassicaceae in order to study SSR evolution...

Data from: Infection with Haemoproteus iwa affects vector movement in a hippoboscid fly – frigatebird system

Iris I. Levin & Patricia G. Parker
Haemosporidian parasites, which require both a vertebrate and invertebrate host, are most commonly studied in the life stages occurring in the vertebrate. However, aspects of the vector's behavior and biology can have profound effects on the parasite dynamics. Here we explore the effects of a haemosporidian parasite, Haemoproteusiwa, on a hippoboscid fly vector, Olfersiaspinifera. Olfersiaspinifera is an obligate ectoparasite of the great frigatebird, Fregata minor, living among bird feathers for all of its adult life....

Data from: Challenging the inbreeding hypothesis in a eusocial mammal: population genetics of the naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber.

Colleen M. Ingram, Nicholas J. Troendle, Clare A. Gill, Stanton Braude & Rodney L. Honeycutt
The role of genetic relatedness in the evolution of eusociality has been the topic of much debate, especially when contrasting eusocial insects with vertebrates displaying reproductive altruism. The naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber, was the first described eusocial mammal. Although this discovery was based on an ecological constraints model of eusocial evolution, early genetic studies reported high levels of relatedness in naked mole-rats, providing a compelling argument that low dispersal rates and consanguineous mating (inbreeding as...

Data from: Predator-driven natural selection on risk-taking behavior in anole lizards

Oriol Lapiedra, Thomas W. Schoener, Manuel Leal, Jonathan B. Losos & Jason J. Kolbe
Biologists have long debated the role of behavior in evolution, yet understanding of its role as a driver of adaptation is hampered by the scarcity of experimental studies of natural selection on behavior in nature. After showing that individual Anolis sagrei lizards vary consistently in risk-taking behaviors, we experimentally established populations on eight small islands either with or without Leiocephalus carinatus, a major ground predator. We found that selection predictably favors different risk-taking behaviors under...

Data from: A biphasic locomotor response to acute unsignaled high temperature exposure in Drosophila.

Daniela Ostrowski, Autoosa Salari, Melissa Zars & Troy Zars
Unsignaled stress can have profound effects on animal behavior. While most investigation of stress-effects on behavior follows chronic exposures, less is understood about acute exposures and potential after-effects. We examined walking activity in Drosophila following acute exposure to high temperature or electric shock. Compared to initial walking activity, flies first increase walking with exposure to high temperatures then have a strong reduction in activity. These effects are related to the intensity of the high temperature...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    13
  • 2021
    18
  • 2020
    15
  • 2019
    7
  • 2018
    19
  • 2017
    14
  • 2016
    17
  • 2015
    20
  • 2014
    13
  • 2013
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    146
  • Journal Article
    2
  • Text
    2

Affiliations

  • University of Missouri
    149
  • University of Georgia
    11
  • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
    9
  • Michigan State University
    5
  • The Ohio State University
    4
  • Texas A&M University
    4
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    4
  • Cornell University
    4
  • Lincoln University
    3
  • George Washington University
    3