17 Works

Data from: Retrotransposon proliferation coincident with the evolution of dioecy in asparagus

Alex Harkess, Francesco Mercati, Loredana Abbate, Michael McKain, J. Chris Pires, Tea Sala, Francesco Sunseri, Agostino Falavigna & Jim Leebens-Mack
Current phylogenetic sampling reveals that dioecy and an XY sex chromosome pair evolved once or possibly twice in the genus Asparagus. Although there appear to be some lineage-specific polyploidization events, the base chromosome number of 2n=2x=20 is relatively conserved across the Asparagus genus. Regardless, dioecious species tend to have larger genomes than hermaphroditic species. Here we test whether this genome size expansion in dioecious species is related to a polyploidization and subsequent chromosome fusion or...

Data from: The genome sequence and insights into the immunogenetics of the bananaquit (Passeriformes: Coereba flaveola)

Jennifer Antonides, Robert Ricklefs & J.A. DeWoody
Avian genomics, especially of non-model species, is in its infancy relative to mammalian genomics. Here, we describe the sequencing, assembly, and annotation of a new avian genome, that of the bananaquit Coereba flaveola (Passeriformes: Thraupidae). We produced ∼30-fold coverage of the genome with an assembly size of ca. 1.2 Gb, including approximately 16,500 annotated genes. Passerine birds, such as the bananaquit, are commonly infected by avian malarial parasites (Haemosporida), which presumably drive adaptive evolution of...

Data from: Genome-wide association study in Arabidopsis thaliana of natural variation in seed oil melting point, a widespread adaptive trait in plants

Sandra E. Branham, Sara J. Wright, Aaron Reba, Ginnie D. Morrison & C. Randal Linder
Seed oil melting point is an adaptive, quantitative trait determined by the relative proportions of the fatty acids that compose the oil. Micro- and macro-evolutionary evidence suggests selection has changed the melting point of seed oils to covary with germination temperatures because of a trade-off between total energy stores and the rate of energy acquisition during germination under competition. The seed oil compositions of 391 natural accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana, grown under common-garden conditions, were...

Data from: Saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea) mortality and population regeneration in the cactus forest of Saguaro National Park: seventy-five years and counting

Thomas V. Orum, Nancy Ferguson & Jeanne D. Mihail
Annual census data spanning seventy-five years document mortality and regeneration in a population of saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) in the Cactus Forest of the Rincon Mountain District of Saguaro National Park near Tucson, AZ. On 6 four-hectare plots, each saguaro was censused and a methodical search for new saguaros was conducted annually each year from 1942 through 2016, with the exception of 1955. Regeneration has been episodic with 828 plants established from 1959 through 1993...

Data from: Fuelwood sustainability revisited: integrating size structure and resprouting into a spatially realistic fuelshed model

Wayne C. Twine & Ricardo M. Holdo
Much concern has been expressed about the sustainability of fuelwood harvesting in Africa. Most models predict that demand will outstrip supply within a few decades, resulting in severe deforestation. However, despite substantial impacts of harvesting on woody vegetation structure, the ‘fuelwood crisis’ predicted since the 1970s has not materialized. We propose that this is at least partially because regeneration through coppicing has been poorly accounted for in most models. We developed a local fuelwood model...

Data from: Does hunting or hiking affect wildlife communities in protected areas?

Roland Kays, Arielle W. Parsons, Megan C. Baker, Ellizabeth L. Kalies, Tavis Forrester, Robert Costello, Christopher T. Rota, Joshua J. Millspaugh & William J. McShea
Managed public wild areas have dual mandates to protect biodiversity and provide recreational opportunities for people. These goals could be at odds if recreation, ranging from hiking to legal hunting, disrupts wildlife enough to alter their space use or community structure. We evaluated the effect of managed hunting and recreation on 12 terrestrial wildlife species by employing a large citizen science camera trapping survey at 1947 sites stratified across different levels of human activities in...

Data from: Timing of rapid diversification and convergent origins of active pollination within Agavoideae (Asparagaceae)

Michael R. McKain, Joel R. McNeal, P. Roxanne Kellar, Luis E. Eguiarte, J. Chris Pires, James Leebens-Mack & Jim Leebens-Mack
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Yucca species are ideal candidates for the study of coevolution due to the obligate mutualism they form with yucca moth pollinators (genera Tegeticula and Parategeticula). Yuccas are not the only species to exhibit a mutualism with yucca moths; the genus Hesperoyucca is pollinated by the California yucca moth (Tegeticula maculata). Relationships among yuccas, Hesperoyucca, and other members of subfamily Agavoideae are necessary to understand the evolution of this unique pollination syndrome....

Data from: Molecular characterization of resistance to soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. & Syd.) in soybean cultivar DT 2000 (PI 635999)

Tri Vuong, David R. Walker, Binh T. Nguyen, Tuyet T. Nguyen, Hoan X. Dinh, David L. Hyten, Perry B. Cregan, David A. Sleper, Jeong D. Lee, James G. Shannon, Henry T. Nguyen & Tri D. Vuong
Resistance to soybean rust (SBR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. & Syd., has been identified in many soybean germplasm accessions and is conferred by either dominant or recessive genes that have been mapped to six independent loci (Rpp1 –Rpp6), but No U.S. cultivars are resistant to SBR. The cultivar DT 2000 (PI 635999) has resistance to P. pachyrhizi isolates and field populations from the United States as well as Vietnam. A F6:7 recombinant inbred line...

Data from: Taxa, petitioning agency, and lawsuits affect time spent awaiting listing under the US Endangered Species Act

Emily Puckett, Dylan C. Kesler, D. Noah Greenwald & Emily E. Puckett
The United States' Endangered Species Act (ESA) is the world's foremost law for protecting species at risk of extinction; however, species must first be listed as threatened or endangered before receiving protection under the Act. We used an information theoretic approach to assess whether listing budget, policy phase (which was correlated with presidential administration), or both factors were associated with the number of species listed annually between 1983 and 2014. Annual listing rates were positively...

Data from: Sexual selection on male vocal fundamental frequency in humans and other anthropoids

David A. Puts, Alexander K. Hill, Drew H. Bailey, Robert S. Walker, Drew Rendall, John R. Wheatley, Lisa L. M. Welling, Khytam Dawood, Rodrigo A. Cárdenas, Robert P. Burriss, Nina G. Jablonski, Mark D. Shriver, Daniel J. Weiss, Adriano R. Lameira, Coren L. Apicella, Michael J. Owren, Claudia Barelli, Mary E. Glenn & Gabriel Ramos-Fernandez
In many primates, including humans, the vocalizations of males and females differ dramatically, with male vocalizations and vocal anatomy often seeming to exaggerate apparent body size. These traits may be favoured by sexual selection because low-frequency male vocalizations intimidate rivals and/or attract females, but this hypothesis has not been systematically tested across primates, nor is it clear why competitors and potential mates should attend to vocalization frequencies. Here we show across anthropoids that sexual dimorphism...

Data from: Hummingbirds control turning velocity using body orientation and turning radius using asymmetrical wingbeat kinematics

Tyson J. G. Read, Paolo S. Segre, Kevin M. Middleton & Douglas L. Altshuler
Turning in flight requires reorientation of force, which birds, bats and insects accomplish either by shifting body position and total force in concert or by using left–right asymmetries in wingbeat kinematics. Although both mechanisms have been observed in multiple species, it is currently unknown how each is used to control changes in trajectory. We addressed this problem by measuring body and wingbeat kinematics as hummingbirds tracked a revolving feeder, and estimating aerodynamic forces using a...

Data from: A phylogenomic assessment of ancient polyploidy and genome evolution across the Poales

Michael R. McKain, Haibao Tang, Joel R. McNeal, Saravanaraj Ayyampalayam, Jerrold I. Davis, Claude W. DePamphilis, Thomas J. Givnish, J. Chris Pires, Dennis Wm. Stevenson & Jim H. Leebens-Mack
Comparisons of flowering plant genomes reveal multiple rounds of ancient polyploidy characterized by large intra-genomic syntenic blocks. Three such whole genome duplication (WGD) events, designated as rho (ρ), sigma (σ), and tau (τ), have been identified in the genomes of cereal grasses. Precise dating of these WGD events is necessary to investigate how they have influenced diversification rates, evolutionary innovations, and genomic characteristics such as the GC profile of protein coding sequences. The timing of...

Data from: A multispecies occupancy model for two or more interacting species

Christopher T. Rota, Marco A. R. Ferreira, Roland W. Kays, Tavis D. Forrester, Elizabeth L. Kalies, William J. McShea, Arielle W. Parsons & Joshua J. Millspaugh
Species occurrence is influenced by environmental conditions and the presence of other species. Current approaches for multispecies occupancy modelling are practically limited to two interacting species and often require the assumption of asymmetric interactions. We propose a multispecies occupancy model that can accommodate two or more interacting species. We generalize the single-species occupancy model to two or more interacting species by assuming the latent occupancy state is a multivariate Bernoulli random variable. We propose modelling...

Data from: Parents face quantity-quality tradeoffs between reproduction and investment in offspring in Iceland

Robert Francis Lynch
How to optimally allocate time, energy and investment in an effort to maximize one's reproductive success is a fundamental problem faced by all organisms. This effort is complicated when the production of each additional offspring dilutes the total resources available for parental investment. Although a quantity–quality trade-off between producing and investing in offspring has long been assumed in evolutionary biology, testing it directly in humans is difficult, partly owing to the long generation time of...

Data from: Resource predictability and specialization in avian malaria parasites

Maria Svensson-Coelho, Bette A. Loiselle, John G. Blake & Robert E. Ricklefs
We tested the hypothesis that avian haemosporidian (malaria) parasites specialize on hosts that can be characterized as predictable resources at a site in Amazonian Ecuador. We incorporated host phylogenetic relationship and relative abundance in assessing parasite specialization, and we examined associations between parasite specialization and three host characteristics – abundance, mass and longevity – using quantile regression, phylogenetic logistic regression and t-tests. Hosts of specialist malaria parasite lineages were on average more abundant than hosts...

Data from: Gα and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) protein pairs maintain functional compatibility and conserved interaction interfaces throughout evolution despite frequent loss of RGS proteins in plants

Dieter Hackenberg, Michael McKain, Soon-Goo Lee, Swarup Roy Choudhury, Tyler McCann, Spencer Schreier, Alex Harkess, J. Chris Pires, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, Joseph Jez, Elizabeth Kellogg, Sona Pandey, Soon Goo Lee, Joseph M. Jez, Michael R. McKain & Elizabeth A. Kellogg
Signaling pathways regulated by heterotrimeric G-proteins exist in all eukaryotes. The regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins are key interactors and critical modulators of the Gα protein of the heterotrimer. However, while G-proteins are widespread in plants, RGS proteins have been reported to be missing from the entire monocot lineage, with two exceptions. A single amino acid substitution-based adaptive coevolution of the Gα:RGS proteins was proposed to enable the loss of RGS in monocots. We...

Data from: Origins of cattle on Chirikof Island, Alaska, elucidated from genome-wide SNP genotypes

Jared E. Decker, Jeremy F. Taylor, Leeson J. Alexander, Juha Kantanen, Ann Millbrooke, Robert D. Schnabel & Michael D. MacNeil
Feral livestock may harbor genetic variation of commercial, scientific, historical or esthetic value. The origins and uniqueness of feral cattle on Chirikof Island, Alaska, are uncertain. The island is now part of the Alaska Maritime Wildlife Refuge and Federal wildlife managers want grazing to cease, presumably leading to demise of the cattle. Here we characterize the cattle of Chirikof Island relative to extant breeds and discern their origins. Our analyses support the inference that Yakut...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • University of Missouri
    17
  • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
    4
  • University of Georgia
    4
  • West Virginia University
    2
  • North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
    2
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
    2
  • Washington University in St. Louis
    2
  • Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
    2
  • Pennsylvania State University
    2