18 Works

RNA-sequencing of endometrial explants

Sandra Recuero, José María Sánchez, Sandra Bagés-Arnal, Michael McDonald, Susanta K. Behura, Thomas E. Spencer, Marc Yeste, Pat Lonergan & Beatriz Fernandez-Fuertes
Seminal plasma (SP) has been shown to modulate the female reproductive environment in mammalian species in which the ejaculate comes into direct contact with the endometrium, such as mice, pigs and horses. In contrast, cattle ejaculate in the vagina, and it is questionable whether the fluid portion reaches the uterus. A recent study from our group reported that mating to intact, but not vasectomised, bulls modifies the endometrium transcriptome. However, it is not clear whether...

Diversification of a polyploid complex: the biogeography and acoustic communication evolution of North American gray treefrogs throughout the Quaternary

William Booker, Emily Lemmon, Alan Lemmon, Margaret Ptacek, Alyssa Hassinger, Johannes Schul & H. Carl Gerhardt
Polyploid speciation and whole genome duplications are major drivers of biological diversity. After polyploid species are formed, the interactions between diploid and polyploid lineages may generate additional diversity in novel cytotypes and phenotypes. In anurans, mate choice by acoustic communication is the primary method by which individuals identify their own species and assess suitable mates. As such, the evolution of acoustic signals is an important mechanism for contributing to reproductive isolation and diversification in this...

Adaptation without specialization early in a host shift: fecundity data

Rafael Rodriguez, Thomas Wood, Frank Stearns, Robert Snyder, Kelley Tilmon, Michael Cast, Randy Hunt & Reginald Cocroft
Students of speciation debate the role of performance trade-offs across different environments early in speciation. We tested for early performance trade-offs with a host shift experiment using a member of the Enchenopa binotata species complex of treehoppers (Hemiptera: Membracidae). In this clade of plant-feeding insects, different species live on different host plants and exhibit strong behavioral and physiological host specialization. After five generations, the experimental host shifts resulted either in no adaptation or in adaptation...

Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Genetic Constructs

Judy Wall, Grant Zane, Thomas Juba, Jennifer Kuehl, Jayashree Ray, Swapnil Chhabra, Valentine Trotter, Maxim Shatsky, Kara De Leon, Kimberly Keller, Kelly Bender, Gareth Butland, Adam Arkin & Adam Deutschbauer
The dissimilatory sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (ATCC 29579), was chosen by the LBNL-led research collaboration ENIGMA to explore tools and protocols for bringing this anaerobe to model status. Here we describe a collection of genetic constructs generated by ENIGMA, which are available to the research community.

Effects of grazing on C:N:P stoichiometry attenuate from soils to plants and insect herbivores in a semi-arid grassland

Nazim Hassan, Xiaofei Li, Jianyong Wang, Hui Zhu, Duofeng Pan, Iqra Naeen, Petri Nummi, Deli Wang, Deborah Finke & Zhiwei Zhong
Understanding the processing of limiting nutrients among organisms is an important goal of community ecology. Less known is how human disturbances may alter the stoichiometric patterns among organisms from different trophic levels within communities. Here, we investigated how livestock grazing affects the C:N:P ecological stoichiometry of soils, plants (Leymus chinensis), and insect herbivores (Euchorthippus spp.) in a semi-arid grassland in northeastern China. We found that 3 years of grazing significantly enhanced soil available N and...

Replaying the evolutionary tape to investigate subgenome dominance in allopolyploid Brassica napus

Kevin Bird, Chad Niederhuth, Shujun Ou, Malia Gehan, J. Chris Pires, Zhiyong Xiong, Robert VanBuren & Patrick Edger
Interspecific hybridization and allopolyploidization merge evolutionarily distinct parental genomes (subgenomes) into a single nucleus. A frequent observation is that one subgenome is "dominant” over the other subgenome, having a greater number of retained genes and being more highly expressed. Which subgenome becomes dominantly expressed in allopolyploids remains poorly understood. Here we “replayed the evolutionary tape” with six isogenic resynthesized Brassica napus (rapeseed) allopolyploid lines and investigated subgenome dominance patterns over the first ten generations post...

Presence, precipitation, and temperature data used to estimate eastern forest songbird historical distributions using climatic niche modeling

Emily Sinnott
Boundaries between vegetation types, known as ecotones, can be dynamic in response to climatic changes. The North American Great Plains includes a forest-grassland ecotone in the south-central United States that has expanded and contracted in recent decades in response to historical periods of drought and pluvial conditions. This dynamic region also marks a western distributional limit for many passerine birds that typically breed in forests of the eastern United States. To better understand the influence...

The Evolutionary History of Wild, Domesticated, and Feral Brassica oleracea (Brassicaceae)

Makenzie Mabry
Understanding the evolutionary history of crops, including identifying wild relatives, helps to provide insight for conservation and crop breeding efforts. Cultivated Brassica oleracea has intrigued researchers for centuries due to its wide diversity in forms, which include cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, and Brussels sprouts. Yet, the evolutionary history of this species remains understudied. With such different vegetables produced from a single species, B. oleracea is a model organism for understanding the power of artificial...

Community composition influences ecosystem resistance and productivity more than species richness or intraspecific diversity

Matthew Bowker, M. Cristina Rengifo-Faiffer, Anita Antoninka, Henry Grover, Kirsten Coe, Kirsten Fisher, Brent Mishler, Mel Oliver & Lloyd Stark
Biodiversity describes the variety of life and may influence properties and processes of ecosystems, such as biomass production and resistance to disturbance. We investigated the effects of multiple facets of biodiversity – species richness and composition of the community, and intraspecific diversity in two key species – on both production and resistance of experimentally-assembled biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We found that productivity was most strongly influenced by community composition (variation in the presence and relative...

Data from: Effects of climate and topography on the diversity anomaly of plants disjunctly distributed in eastern Asia and eastern North America

Xue Yin, Hong Qian, Xinghua Sui, Minhua Zhang, Lingfeng Mao, Jens-Christian Svenning, Robert E. Ricklefs & Fangliang He
Aim: Differences in physiography have been proposed to explain the diversity anomaly for vascular plants between environmentally similar regions of eastern Asia (EAS) and eastern North America (ENA). Here, we use plant species within disjunct genera to examine whether differences in topography contribute to the diversity anomaly and whether the richness–environment relationships differ between regions. Disjuncts are used to ensure that the diversity anomaly relates to post-disjunction evolution and diversification rather than regional differences in...

Changes in species composition mediate direct effects of climate change on future fire regimes of boreal forests in northeastern China

Chao Huang, Hong He, Yu Liang, Todd Hawbaker, Paul Henne, Wenru Xu, Peng Gong & Zhi Zhu
1. Direct effects of climate change (i.e., temperature rise, changes in seasonal precipitation, wind patterns, and atmospheric stability) affect fire regimes of boreal forests by altering fire behavior, fire seasons, and fuel moisture. Climate change also alters species composition and fuel characteristics, which subsequently alter fire regimes. However, indirect effects of climate change are often simplified or neglected in the direct climate-fire relationship models and dynamic global vegetation models. This may result in high uncertainties...

Data from: Stranger than a scorpion: a reassessment of Parioscorpio venator, a problematic arthropod from the Llandoverian Waukesha Lagerstätte

Evan Anderson, James Schiffbauer, Sarah Jacquet, James Lamsdell, Joanne Kluessendorf & Donald Mikulic
A relatively uncommon arthropod of the Waukesha lagerstätte, Parioscorpio venator, is redescribed as an arthropod bearing a combination of characters that defy ready classification. Diagnostic features include sub-chelate ‘great appendages’, a lack of antennae, multiramous anterior trunk appendages, filamentous fan-like rear trunk appendages, and apparently thin and poorly preserved pleural fields. Phylogenetic analysis resolves this organism as basal to crown-group Mandibulata and Chelicerata, but its exact placement is inconclusive. Thus, we compare its morphology to...

Northern Bobwhite juvenile survival southwest Missouri 2016-2018

Emily Sinnott, Frank Thompson, Mitch Weegman & Thomas Thompson
These data and code are associated with the publication in Ornithological Applications entitled "Northern Bobwhite juvenile survival is greater on native grasslands managed with fire and grazing, and lower in non-native field borders and strip crop fields." We evaluated the influence of brood age, vegetation cover type, woody vegetation structure, habitat management, and landscape cover on juvenile survival in southwest Missouri 2016-2018.

Hematoma expansion shift analysis to assess acute intracerebral hemorrhage treatments

Vignan Yogendrakumar, Tim Ramsay, Bijoy Menon, Adnan Qureshi, Jeffrey Saver & Dar Dowlatshahi
Objective: Hematoma expansion (HE) is commonly analyzed as a dichotomous outcome in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) trials. In this proof-of-concept study, we propose a “HE shift” analysis model as a method to improve the evaluation of candidate ICH therapies. Methods: Using data from the Antihypertensive Treatment of Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage II (ATACH-2) trial, we performed HE shift analysis in response to intensive blood pressure lowering by generating polychotomous strata based on a) previously established HE definitions,...

Fossil evidence unveils an early Cambrian origin for Bryozoa

Zhiliang Zhang, Zhifei Zhang, Junye Ma, Paul Taylor, Luke Strotz, Sarah Jacquet, Christian Skovsted, Feiyang Chen, Jian Han & Glenn Brock
Bryozoans (ectoprocts or moss animals) are aquatic, dominantly sessile, filter-feeding lophophorates that construct an organic or calcareous modular colonial (clonal) exoskeleton. The presence of six major orders of bryozoans with advanced polymorphisms in lower Ordovician rocks strongly suggests a Cambrian origin for the largest and most diverse lophophorate phylum. However, a lack of convincing bryozoan fossils from the Cambrian has hampered resolution of the true origins and character assembly of earliest members of the group....

The lion's mane: sexual and natural selection on pollen morphology in Taraxacum

Austin Lynn, Emelyn Piotter, Ellie Harrison & Candace Galen
Premise of the study: Spiny pollen has evolved independently in multiple entomophilous lineages. Sexual selection may act on exine traits that facilitate male mating success by influencing the transfer of pollen from the anther to the body of the pollinator, while natural selection acts to increase pollen survival. We postulated that relative to sexual congeners, apomictic dandelions undergo relaxed selection on traits associated with male mating success. Methods: We explored sexual selection on exine traits...

The Forgotten Kingdom. New investigations in the prehistory of Eswatini

Gregor D. Bader, Bob Forrester, Lisa Ehlers, Elizabeth Velliky, Brandy Lee MacDonald & Jörg Linstädter
Journal of Global Archaeology, 2021

The contributions of individual traits to survival among terrestrial juvenile pond-breeding salamanders

Arianne Messerman & Manuel Leal
Individual survival is influenced by interactions between local environmental conditions and an organism’s morphological, behavioral, and physiological traits. Studies examining the effects of individual phenotypes on survival under variable conditions are relatively rare among early transitional life stages, though the vital rates of these life stages can importantly influence population dynamics. We experimentally examined the effects of initial body mass, movement, standard metabolic rate (SMR), and respiratory surface area water loss (RSAWL) on survival in...

Registration Year

  • 2021
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Affiliations

  • University of Missouri
    17
  • The Ohio State University
    2
  • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
    1
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    1
  • Northwest University
    1
  • Johns Hopkins University
    1
  • Heilongjiang Provincial Academy of Agricultural Sciences
    1
  • Inner Mongolia University
    1
  • University of Saskatchewan
    1
  • Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria
    1