472 Works

ICOS Atmosphere Level 2 data, Svartberget, release 2019-1

Per Marklund & Mikaell Ottosson-Löfvenius
ICOS Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Mole Fractions of CO2, CH4, CO and Meteorological Observations, period 2017-06-01 to 2019-04-30, Svartberget, final quality controlled Level 2 data, release 2019-1. All ICOS stations follow the ICOS Atmospheric Station specification V1.3 (https://www.icos-ri.eu/fetch/ba12290c-3714-4dd5-a9f0-c431b9900ad1;1.0) and are certified as ICOS atmospheric stations Class I or II. Data processing has been performed as described in Hazan et al., 2016 (doi:10.5194/amt-9-4719-2016).

Data from: Bryophyte community composition and diversity are indicators of hydrochemical and ecological gradients in temperate kettle hole mires in Ohio, USA

Roger Grau-Andrés, G. Matt Davies, Camilo Rey-Sanchez & Julie Slater
Peatlands are subject to increased pressure from environmental and land-use change, particularly in temperate regions such as the US Midwest. Bryophytes dominate the ground cover of peatlands and play a key role in their functioning. Effective management and restoration of degraded peatlands requires good understanding of their bryophyte communities, and how these are shaped by environmental conditions. Furthermore, bryophytes are sensitive indicators of environmental conditions. We monitored microhabitat characteristics (hydrology, hydrochemistry, abundance of vascular vegetation,...

Long-term warming affects ecosystem functioning through species turnover and intraspecific trait variation

Tiina Salo, Johanna Mattila & Johan Eklöf
Effects of climate change on natural ecosystems can be mediated by ecological processes, but also by rapid evolutionary adaptations and/or non-heritable trait changes in organisms. So far, most studies testing the importance of inter- vs. intraspecific changes for how communities and their functioning responds to climate change are either short-term laboratory experiments in highly controlled (artificial) environments, or long-term field surveys suffering from lack of experimental manipulation. Here, we quantified how community composition and functioning...

Catchment properties and the photosynthetic trait composition of freshwater plant communities

Lars Lønsmann Iversen, A. Winkel, L. Baastrup-Spohr, A. B. Hinke, J. Alahuhta, A. Baattrup-Pedersen, S. Birk, P. Brodersen, P. A. Chambers, F. Ecke, T. Feldmann, D. Gebler, J. Heino, T. S. Jespersen, S. J. Moe, T. Riis, L. Sass, O. Vestergaard, S. C. Maberly, K. Sand-Jensen & O. Pedersen
Unlike in land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to carbon dioxide (CO2) to compensate for the low diffusivity and potential depletion of CO2 in water. Concentrations of bicarbonate and CO2 vary greatly with catchment geology. In this study, we investigate whether there is a link between these concentrations and the frequency of freshwater plants possessing the bicarbonate use trait. We show, globally, that the frequency of plant species with...

Presence-absence sampling for estimating plant density using survey data with variable plot size

Göran Ståhl, Magnus Ekström, Jonas Dahlgren, Per-Anders Esseen, Anton Grafström & Bengt Jonsson
1. Presence-absence sampling is an important method for monitoring state and change of both individual plant species and communities. With this method only the presence or absence of the target species is recorded on plots and thus the method is straightforward to apply and less prone to surveyor judgment compared to other vegetation monitoring methods. However, in the basic setting all plots must be equally large or otherwise it is unclear how data should be...

Data from: Molecular mapping and identification of quantitative trait loci for domestication traits in field cress (Lepidium campestre L.) genome

Zeratsion Abera Desta, Dirk-Jan De Koning & Rodomiro Ortiz
Lepidium campestre (L.) or field cress is a multifaceted oilseed plant, which has not been domesticated yet. Moreover, the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying the domestication traits of field cress remain largely elusive. The overarching goal is to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that are fundamental for domestication of field cress. Mapping and dissecting quantitative trait variation may provide important insights into genomic trajectories underlying field cress domestication. We used 7624 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)...

Examining the link between relaxed predation and bird colouration on islands

Louis Bliard, Matthieu Paquet, Aloïs Robert, Paul Dufour, Julien Renoult, Arnaud Gregoire, Pierre-Andre Crochet, Rita Covas & Claire Doutrelant
Insular ecosystems share analogous ecological conditions, leading to patterns of convergent evolution that are collectively termed the “island syndrome”. In birds, part of this syndrome is a tendency for a duller plumage, possibly as a result of relaxed sexual selection and the reduced need for species recognition. Despite this global pattern, some insular species display a more colourful plumage than their mainland relatives, but why this occurs has remained unexplained. Here, we examine the hypothesis...

Data from: Ecosystem service multifunctionality of low-productivity forests and implications for conservation and management

Mari Jönsson & Tord Snäll
Low-productivity forests are often the last remaining pristine forests in managed forest landscapes and typically overrepresented among protected forests. However, the provisioning of individual and multiple ecosystem services (ES-multifunctionality) by these forests remains poorly assessed, making it difficult to evaluate their importance in forest conservation and management. Using nationwide data on ecosystem services (ES) from forest plots, we test whether levels of ES-multifunctionality and individual ES differ between low-productivity forested mires and rocky outcrops in...

Unexpectedly diverse forest dung beetle communities in degraded rainforest landscapes in Madagascar

Kaisa Torppa, Helena Wirta & Ilkka Hanski
Tropical forests, which harbor high levels of biodiversity, are being lost at an alarming speed. Madagascar, a biodiversity hotspot, has lost more than half of its original forest cover. Most of the remaining forests are small fragments of primary and secondary forest with differing degrees of human impact. These forests, as well as coffee and fruit plantations, may be important in supporting the forest dependent biodiversity in Madagascar but this has been little studied. In...

Insects reared out from logging residues on clear cuts in southern Sweden

Mats Jonsell
Growing interest in harvesting logging residues for energy production will reduce the amount of fine (small-diameter) wood. This could pose a threat to saproxylic (dead-wood living) organisms. Therefore, we asked firstly if logging residues have a beetle fauna of conservation interest, and secondly which differences there are between different categories of logging residues. Samples of logging-residue wood of aspen, birch, oak and spruce, divided into three diameter classes ranging between 1 and 15 cm were...

Data from: Resource dispersion and relatedness interact to explain space use in a solitary predator

Malin Aronsson, Mikael Åkesson, Matthew Low, Jens Persson & Henrik Andrén
Resource dispersion or kin selection are commonly used to explain animal spatial and social organization. Despite this, studies examining how these factors interact in wild populations of solitary animals are rare. We used 16 years of individual-level spatial and genetic data to disentangle how resources and relatedness influence spatial organization of a solitary predator, the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx). As expected, space-use overlap between neighbouring individuals increased when food resources were heterogeneous and unpredictably distributed...

Central place foraging in a human-dominated landscape - how do common cranes select feeding sites?

Lovisa Nilsson, Jens Persson, Nils Bunnefeld & Johan Månsson
Human infrastructure and disturbance play an important role when animals select resources in human-modified landscapes. Theory predicts that animals trade food intake against costs of movement or disturbance to optimize net energy gain and fitness, but other necessary resources may also constrain the decisions, e.g. when animals repeatedly need to return to a central location, such as a nest, waterhole or night roost. Central place foraging theory states that the probability of occurrence of an...

Data from: Genetic evidence for sexual reproduction and multiple infections of Norway spruce cones by the rust fungus Thekopsora areolata

Hernan Capador, Berit Samils, Juha Kaitera & Ake Olson
Rust fungi are obligate parasites of plants with complex and in many cases poorly known life cycles which may include host alteration and up to five spore types with haploid, diploid and dikaryotic nuclear stages. This study supports that Thekopasora areolata, the causal agent of cherry-spruce rust in Norway spruce, is a macrocyclic heteroecious fungus with all five spore stages which uses two host plants Prunus padus and Picea abies to complete its life cycle....

Cannot see the diversity for all the species: evaluating inclusion criteria for local species lists when using abundant citizen science data

Alejandro Ruete, Debora Arlt, Åke Berg, Jonas Knape, Michał Żmihorski & Tomas Pärt
Abundant citizen science data on species occurrences is becoming increasingly available and enables identifying composition of communities occurring at multiple sites with high temporal resolution. However, for species displaying temporary patterns of local occurrences, i.e. that are transient to some sites, biodiversity measures are clearly dependent on the criteria used to include species into local species lists. Using abundant opportunistic citizen science data from frequently visited wetlands we investigated the sensitivity of α- and β-diversity...

Data offspring performance following two-donor crosses at different floral stages and with different competitor types in greenhouse studies of Collinsia heterophylla

Åsa Lankinen, Josefin Madjidian, Henrik G. Smith & Stefan Andersson
Data on two offspring performance traits (seeds per capsule and flower number) in greenhouse studies of Collinsia heterophylla to investigate indirect benefits of mate choice. We performed two-donor pollinations during successive floral stages and with different competitor types (outcross and self) to assess how stigma receptivity and two pollen traits known to affect siring success influence offspring performance. We also investigated the link between seed production in mothers and offspring as an indication of heritability...

Effects of plant functional group removal on CO2 fluxes and belowground C stocks across contrasting ecosystems

Roger Grau-Andrés, David Wardle, Michael Gundale, Claire Foster & Paul Kardol
Changes in plant communities can have large effects on ecosystem carbon (C) dynamics and long-term C stocks. However, how these effects are mediated by environmental context or vary among ecosystems is not well understood. To study this, we used a long-term plant removal experiment set up across 30 forested lake islands in northern Sweden which collectively represent a strong gradient of soil fertility and ecosystem productivity. We measured forest floor CO2 exchange and aboveground and...

Forest inventory data from Finland and Sweden for: Demographic performance of European tree species at their hot and cold climatic edges, plus ancillary climate data

Sophia Ratcliffe, Jonas Dahlgren, Aleksi Lehtonen, Christian Wirth, Paloma Ruiz-Benito, Miguel A. Zavala, Gerald Kaendler, Raisa Mäkipää & Georges Kunstler
1. Species range limits are thought to result from a decline in demographic performance at range edges. However, recent studies reporting contradictory patterns in species demographic performance at their edges cast doubt on our ability to predict climate change demographic impacts. To understand these inconsistent demographic responses at the edges, we need to shift the focus from geographic to climatic edges and analyse how species responses vary with climatic constraints at the edge and species’...

A large wild salmon stock shows genetic and life history differentiation within, but not between, rivers

Antti Miettinen, Stefan Palm, Johan Dannewitz, Emma Lind, Craig R. Primmer, Atso Romakkaniemi, Johan Östergren & Victoria L. Pritchard
Anadromous salmonid fishes frequently exhibit strong geographic population structuring. However, population genetic differentiation of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) at fine geographic scales differs across equivalent spatial extents in different regions. So far, fine-scale genetic differentiation has not been assessed in rivers of the Baltic Sea, a region that contains an evolutionarily distinct Atlantic salmon lineage. Thus, Baltic salmon are currently managed on the river level, without focus on potential genetic structure and diversity within rivers....

Tree water uptake enhances nitrogen acquisition in a fertilized boreal forest – but not under nitrogen poor conditions

Nils Henriksson, Hyungwoo Lim, John Marchall, Oskar Franklin, Ross McMurtrie, Reimo Lutter, Ruth Magh, Tomas Lundmark & Torgny Näsholm
Understanding how plant water uptake interacts with acquisition of soil nitrogen (N) and other nutrients is fundamental for predicting plant responses to a changing environment, but it is an area where models disagree. We present a novel isotopic labelling approach which reveals spatial patterns of water and N uptake, and their interaction, by trees. The stable isotopes 15N and 2H were applied to a small area of the forest floor in stands with high and...

Distribution of large carnivores in Europe 2012 - 2016: Distribution maps for Brown bear, Eurasian lynx, Grey wolf, and Wolverine

Petra Kaczensky, John D.C. Linnell, Djuro Huber, Manuela Von Arx, Henrik Andren, Urs Breitenmoser & Luigi Boitani
Regular assessments of species’ status are an essential component of conservation planning and adaptive management. They allow the progress of past or ongoing conservation actions to be evaluated and can be used to redirect and prioritise future conservation actions. Most countries perform periodic assessments for their own national adaptive management procedures or national red lists. Furthermore, the countries of the European Union have to report on the status of all species listed on the directives...

Data from: Season rather than habitat affects lynx survival and risk of mortality in the human-dominated landscape of southern Sweden

Henrik Andren, Aronsson Malin, José V. Lopez-Bao, Gustaf Samelius, Guillaume Chapron, Geir Rune Rauset, Heather Hemmingmoore & Jens Persson
Landscapes are mosaics of habitat associated with different risks and resources, including human activities, which can affect individual survival in wildlife. Different relationships between habitat characteristics and human-caused and natural mortality can result in attractive sinks. We used individual-based data from 97 Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) monitored for 160 exposure years to link adult survival and the risk of mortality to home range habitat characteristics in the human-dominated landscape of southern Sweden. Human-caused mortality dominated...

The role of terrestrial productivity in regulating aquatic dissolved organic carbon concentrations in boreal catchments

Xudan Zhu, Liang Chen, Jukka Pumpanen, Anne Ojala, John Zobitz, Xuan Zhou, Hjalmar Laudon, Marjo Palviainen, Kimmo Neitola & Frank Berninger
The past decades have witnessed an increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in the catchments of the Northern Hemisphere. Increases in terrestrial productivity may be a reason for the increases in DOC concentration. The aim of this study is to investigate the impacts of increased terrestrial productivity and changed hydrology following climate change on DOC concentrations. We tested and quantified the effects of gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (RE) and discharge on DOC...

Data from: Thermal differences between juveniles and adults increased over time in European forest trees

Maria Mercedes Caron, Florian Zellweger, Kris Verheyen, Lander Baeten, Radim Hédl, Bernhardt-Römermann Markus, Imre Berki, Jörg Brunet, Guillaume Decocq, Sandra Díaz, Thomas Dirnböck, Tomasz Durak, Thilo Heinken, Bogdan Jaroszewicz, Martin Kopecký, Jonathan Lenoir, Martin Macek, Malicki Marek, František Máliš, Thomas Nagel, Michael Perring, Petr Petřík, Kamila Reczyńska, Remigiusz Pielech, Wolfgang Schmidt … & Pieter De Frenne
Woody species’ requirements and environmental sensitivity change from seedlings to adults, a process referred to as ontogenetic shift. Such shifts can be increased by climate change. To assess the changes in the difference of temperature experienced by seedlings and adults in the context of climate change, it is essential to have reliable climatic data over long periods that capture the thermal conditions experienced by the individuals throughout their life cycle. Here we used a unique...

Root traits along a subarctic tundra elevational gradient

Clydecia Spitzer
While root trait research has received increasing attention over the past two decades, the relationship between root traits and environmental factors remains elusive. At the same time, knowledge about these relationships is necessary if we are to understand plant community responses to environmental change. Here, we assessed the relationships between elevation (i.e., temperature) and fine root traits of plant species and communities. We focused on the sub-arctic tundra where plant communities are expected to experience...

Punctuational ecological changes rather than global factors drive species diversification and the evolution of wing phenotypes in Morpho butterflies

Nicolas Chazot, Patrick Blandin, Vincent Debat, Marianne Elias & Fabien Condamine
Assessing the relative importance of geographical and ecological drivers of evolution is paramount to understand the diversification of species and traits at the macroevolutionary scale. Here, we use an integrative approach, combining phylogenetics, biogeography, ecology, and quantified phenotypes to investigate the drivers of both species and phenotypic diversification of the iconic Neotropical butterfly genus Morpho. We generated a time-calibrated phylogeny for all known species and inferred historical biogeography. We fitted models of time-dependent (accounting for...

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