56 Works

Evolution of chain migration in an aerial insectivorous bird, the common swift Apus apus

Susanne Akesson, Phil Atkinson, Ana Bermejo, Javier De La Puente, Mauro Ferri, Chris Hewson, Jan Holmgren, Erich Kaiser, Lyndon Kearsley, Raymond Klaassen, Heikki Kolunen, Gittan Matsson, Fausto Minelli, Gabriel Norevik, Hannu Pietiäinen, Navinder J Singh, Fernando Spina, Lukas Viktora & Anders Hedenstrom
Spectacular long-distance migration has evolved repeatedly in animals enabling exploration of resources separated in time and space. In birds, these patterns are largely driven by seasonality, cost of migration, and asymmetries in competition leading most often to leap-frog migration, where northern breeding populations winter furthest to the south. Here we show that the highly aerial common swift Apus apus, spending the non-breeding period on the wing, instead exhibits a rarely-found chain migration pattern, where the...

Data from: Why we should care about movements: Using spatially explicit integrated population models to assess habitat source-sink dynamics

Matthieu Paquet, Debora Arlt, Jonas Knape, Matthew Low, Pär Forslund & Tomas Pärt
1. Assessing the source-sink status of populations and habitats is of major importance for understanding population dynamics and for the management of natural populations. Sources produce a net surplus of individuals (per capita contribution to the metapopulation >1) and will be the main contributors for self-sustaining populations, whereas sinks produce a deficit (contribution < 1). However, making these types of assessments is generally hindered by the problem of separating mortality from permanent emigration, especially when...

European soil seed bank communities across a climate and land-cover gradient

Jan Plue, Hans Van Calster, Inger Auestad, Sofia Basto, Reneé M. Bekker, Hans Henrik Bruun, Richard Chevalier, Guillaume Decocq, Ulf Grandin, Martin Hermy, Hans Jacquemyn, Anna Jakobsson, Rein Kalamees, Rob H. Marrs, Bryndis Marteinsdóttir, Per Milberg, Robin J. Pakeman, Gareth Phoenix, Ken Thompson, Vigdis Vandvik, Markus Wagner, Sara A.O. Cousins, Ove Eriksson, Jamshid Ghorbani, Małgorzata Jankowska-Błaszczuk … & Alistair G. Auffret
This is the data set used for the publication Buffering effects of soil seed banks on plant community composition in response to land use and climate, published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography. Aim. Climate and land use are key determinants of biodiversity, with past and ongoing changes posing serious threats to global ecosystems. Unlike most other organism groups, plant species can possess dormant life-history stages such as soil seed banks, which may help...

Modelled spatiotemporally explicit fish densities at different fisheries management scenarios

Jonas Hentati-Sundberg
Conflicts of interest between resource extraction and conservation are widespread, and negotiating such conflicts or trade-offs is a key issue for ecosystem managers. One such trade-off is resource competition between fisheries and marine top predators. Managing this trade-off has so far been difficult due to a lack of knowledge regarding the amount and distribution of prey required by top predators. Here, we develop a framework that can be used to address this gap: a bio-energetic...

Data from: Fire and grazing controlling a tropical tree line: Effects of long‐term grazing exclusion in Bale Mountains, Ethiopia

Maria Ulrika Johansson & Anders Granström
Aims: Tropical tree lines are often associated with abrupt shifts in vegetation, soils and disturbance regimes, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We analysed the role of grazing, fuels and fire in maintaining a sharp tree line with flammable heathland above non-flammable forest. Location: Bale Mountains, Ethiopia. Methods: Grazing exclosures, repeated vegetation sampling, soil analyses and burning and sowing experiments along an altitudinal gradient with Hagenia abyssinica forest, Erica trimera forest and Erica heathland;...

Genetic diversity of farmed and wild Rufiji tilapia (Oreochromis urolepis urolepis) populations

Christos Palaiokostas
Rufiji tilapia (Oreochromis urolepis urolepis) is an endemic cichlid in Tanzania. In addition to its importance for biodiversity conservation, Rufiji tilapia is also attractive for farming due to its high growth-rate, salinity tolerance, and the production of all-male hybrids when crossed with Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The aim of the current study was to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of both wild and farmed Rufiji tilapia populations in order to inform conservation and...

Data from: Influence of canopy openness, ungulate exclosure, and low-intensity fire for improved oak regeneration in temperate Europe

Linda Petersson, Daniel Dey, Annika Felton, Emile Gardiner & Magnus Löf
Failed oak regeneration is widely reported in temperate forests and has been linked in part to changed disturbance regimes and land-use. We investigated if the North American fire-oak hypothesis could be applicable to temperate European oaks (Q. robur, Q. petraea) using a replicated field experiment with contrasting canopy openness, protection against ungulate browsing (fencing/no fencing), and low-intensity surface fire (burn/no burn). Survival, relative height growth (RGRH), browsing damage on naturally regenerated oaks (≤300 cm tall),...

Crop diversity benefits carabid and pollinator communities in landscapes with semi-natural habitats

Guillermo Aguilera Núñez, Tomas Roslin, Kirsten Miller, Giovanni Tamburini, Klaus Birkhofer, Berta Caballero-Lopez, Sandra Lindström, Erik Öckinger, , Adrien Rusch, Henrik Smith & Riccardo Bommarco
1. In agricultural landscapes, arthropods provide essential ecosystem services such as biological pest control and pollination. Intensified crop management practices and homogenization of landscapes have led to declines among such organisms. Semi-natural habitats, associated with high numbers of these organisms, are increasingly lost from agricultural landscapes but diversification by increasing crop diversity has been proposed as a way to reverse observed arthropod declines and thus restore ecosystem services. However, whether or not an increase in...

The effectiveness of flower strips and hedgerows on pest control, pollination services and crop yield: a quantitative synthesis

Matthias Albrecht, David Kleijn, Neal Williams, Matthias Tschumi, Brett Blaauw, Riccardo Bommarco, Alistair Campbell, Matteo Dainese, Frank Drummond, Martin Entling, Dominik Ganser, Arjen De Groot, David Goulson, Heather Grab, Hannah Hamilton, Felix Herzog, Rufus Isaacs, Katja Jacot, Philippe Jeanneret, Mattias Jonsson, Eva Knop, Claire Kremen, Doug Landis, Greg Loeb, Lorenzo Marini … & Louis Sutter
Floral plantings are promoted to foster ecological intensification of agriculture through provisioning of ecosystem services. However, a comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of different floral plantings, their characteristics and consequences for crop yield is lacking. Here we quantified the impacts of flower strips and hedgerows on pest control (18 studies) and pollination services (17 studies) in adjacent crops in North America, Europe and New Zealand. Flower strips, but not hedgerows, enhanced pest control services in...

Data from: Island properties dominate species traits in determining plant colonizations in an archipelago system

Mikael Von Numers, Sami Aikio, Satu Ramula & Anne Muola
The extrinsic determinants hypothesis emphasizes the essential role of environmental heterogeneity in species’ colonization. Consequently, high resident species diversity can increase community susceptibility to colonizations because good habitats may support more species that are functionally similar to colonizers. On the other hand, colonization success is also likely to depend on species traits. We tested the relative importance of environmental characteristics and species traits in determining colonization success using census data of 587 vascular plant species...

Population structure of five native sheep breeds of Sweden estimated with high density SNP genotypes

Christina Marie Rochus, Elisabeth Jonas & Anna M. Johansson
Background Native Swedish sheep breeds are part of the North European short-tailed sheep group; characterized in part by their genetic uniqueness. Our objective was to study the population structure of native Swedish sheep. Five breeds were genotyped using the 600 K SNP array. Dalapäls and Klövsjö sheep are from the middle of Sweden; Gotland and Gute sheep from Gotland, an island in the Baltic Sea; and Fjällnäs sheep from northern Sweden. We studied population structure...

Wild strawberry shows genetic variation in tolerance but not resistance to a generalist herbivore

Minggang Wang, Anne Muola, Peter Anderson & Johan Stenberg
Plants’ defenses against herbivores usually include both resistance and tolerance mechanisms. Their deployment has predominantly been studied in either single plant genotypes, or multiple genotypes exposed to single herbivores. In natural situations, however, most plants are attacked by multiple herbivores. Therefore, aims of this study were to assess and compare effects of single and multiple herbivores on plant resistance and tolerance traits, and the consequences for overall plant performance. For this, we exposed multiple genotypes...

Scripts and files for \"Small-scale population divergence is driven by local larval environment in a temperate amphibian\"

Patrik Rödin Mörch, Hugo Palejowski, Maria Cortazar-Chinarro, Simon Kärvemo, Alex Richter-Boix, Jacob Höglund & Anssi Laurila
Genomic variation within and among populations is shaped by the interplay between natural selection and the effects of genetic drift and gene flow. Adaptive divergence can be found in small scale natural systems even when population sizes are small and the potential for gene flow is high, suggesting that local environments exert selection pressures strong enough to counteract the opposing effects of drift and gene flow. Here, we investigated genomic differentiation in nine moor frog...

Data from: Ecological speciation in European whitefish is driven by a large‐gaped predator

Gunnar Öhlund, Mats Bodin, Karin Nilsson, Sven-Ola Öhlund, Kenyon Mobley, Alan Hudson, Mikael Peedu, Åke Brännström, Pia Bartels, Kim Præbel, Catherine Hein, Petter Johansson & Göran Englund
Lake‐dwelling fish that form species pairs/flocks characterized by body size divergence are important model systems for speciation research. Although several sources of divergent selection have been identified in these systems, their importance for driving the speciation process remains elusive. A major problem is that in retrospect, we cannot distinguish selection pressures that initiated divergence from those acting later in the process. To address this issue, we studied the initial stages of speciation in European whitefish...

Data for: Microclimate structures communities, predation and herbivory in the High Arctic

Tuomas Kankaanpää, Nerea Abrego, Eero Vesterinen & Tomas Roslin
In a warming world, changes in climate may result in species-level responses as well as changes in community structure through knock-on effects on ecological interactions such as predation and herbivory. Yet, the links between these responses at different levels are still inadequately understood. Assessing how microclimatic conditions affect each of them at local scales provides information essential for understanding the consequences of macroclimatic changes projected in the future. Focusing on the rapidly changing High Arctic,...

Water stress and insect herbivory interactively reduce crop yield while the insect pollination benefit is conserved

Chloé Raderschall, Giulia Vico, Ola Lundin, Astrid Taylor & Riccardo Bommarco
Climate change is predicted to hamper crop production due to precipitation deficits and warmer temperatures inducing both water stress and increasing herbivory due to more abundant insect pests. Consequently, crop yields will be impacted simultaneously by abiotic and biotic stressors. Extensive yield losses due to such climate change stressors might, however, be mitigated by ecosystem services such as insect pollination. We examined the single and combined effects of water stress, insect herbivory and insect pollination...

Data from: Impact of a recolonizing, cross-border carnivore population on ungulate harvest in Scandinavia

Camilla Wikenros, Håkan Sand, Johan Månsson, Erling Maartmann, Petter Wabakken & Barbara Zimmermann
Predation from large carnivores and human harvest are the two main mortality factors affecting the dynamics of many ungulate populations. We examined long-term moose (Alces alces) harvest data from two countries that share cross-border populations of wolves (Canis lupus) and their main prey moose. We tested how a spatial gradient of increasing wolf territory density affected moose harvest density and age and sex composition of the harvested animals (n = 549,310), along a latitudinal gradient...

Stochastic processes and ecological connectivity drive stream invertebrate community responses to short-term drought

Romain Sarremejane, Amélie Truchy, Brendan McKie, Heikki Mykrä, Richard Johnson, Ari Huusko, Ryan Sponseller & Timo Muotka
1. Community responses to and recovery from disturbances depend on local (e.g. presence of refuges) and regional (connectivity to recolonization sources) factors. Droughts are becoming more frequent in boreal regions, and are likely to constitute a severe disturbance for boreal stream communities where organisms largely lack adaptations to such hydrological extremes. 2. We conducted an experiment in 24 seminatural stream flumes to assess the effects of local and regional factors on the responses of benthic...

Data from: Divergence of Arctic shrub growth associated with sea ice decline

Agata Buchwal, Patrick F. Sullivan, Marc Macias-Fauria, Eric Post, Isla H. Myers-Smith, Julienne C. Stroeve, Daan Blok, Ken D. Tape, Bruce C. Forbes, Pascale Ropars, Esther Lévesque, Bo Elberling, Sandra Angers-Blondin, Joseph S. Boyle, Stéphane Boudreau, Noémie Boulanger-Lapointe, Cassandra Gamm, Martin Hallinger, Grzegorz Rachlewicz, Amanda Young, Pentti Zetterberg & Jeffrey M. Welker
Arctic sea ice extent (SIE) is declining at an accelerating rate with a wide range of ecological consequences. However, determining sea ice effects on tundra vegetation remains a challenge. In this study, we examined the universality or lack thereof in tundra shrub growth responses to changes in SIE and summer climate across the Pan-Arctic, taking advantage of 23 tundra shrub-ring chronologies from 19 widely distributed sites (56⁰-83⁰N).

Data from: Molecular mapping and identification of quantitative trait loci for domestication traits in field cress (Lepidium campestre L.) genome

Zeratsion Abera Desta, Dirk-Jan De Koning & Rodomiro Ortiz
Lepidium campestre (L.) or field cress is a multifaceted oilseed plant, which has not been domesticated yet. Moreover, the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying the domestication traits of field cress remain largely elusive. The overarching goal is to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that are fundamental for domestication of field cress. Mapping and dissecting quantitative trait variation may provide important insights into genomic trajectories underlying field cress domestication. We used 7624 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)...

Examining the link between relaxed predation and bird colouration on islands

Louis Bliard, Matthieu Paquet, Aloïs Robert, Paul Dufour, Julien Renoult, Arnaud Gregoire, Pierre-Andre Crochet, Rita Covas & Claire Doutrelant
Insular ecosystems share analogous ecological conditions, leading to patterns of convergent evolution that are collectively termed the “island syndrome”. In birds, part of this syndrome is a tendency for a duller plumage, possibly as a result of relaxed sexual selection and the reduced need for species recognition. Despite this global pattern, some insular species display a more colourful plumage than their mainland relatives, but why this occurs has remained unexplained. Here, we examine the hypothesis...

Unexpectedly diverse forest dung beetle communities in degraded rainforest landscapes in Madagascar

Kaisa Torppa, Helena Wirta & Ilkka Hanski
Tropical forests, which harbor high levels of biodiversity, are being lost at an alarming speed. Madagascar, a biodiversity hotspot, has lost more than half of its original forest cover. Most of the remaining forests are small fragments of primary and secondary forest with differing degrees of human impact. These forests, as well as coffee and fruit plantations, may be important in supporting the forest dependent biodiversity in Madagascar but this has been little studied. In...

Data from: Ecosystem service multifunctionality of low-productivity forests and implications for conservation and management

Mari Jönsson & Tord Snäll
Low-productivity forests are often the last remaining pristine forests in managed forest landscapes and typically overrepresented among protected forests. However, the provisioning of individual and multiple ecosystem services (ES-multifunctionality) by these forests remains poorly assessed, making it difficult to evaluate their importance in forest conservation and management. Using nationwide data on ecosystem services (ES) from forest plots, we test whether levels of ES-multifunctionality and individual ES differ between low-productivity forested mires and rocky outcrops in...

Forest inventory data from Finland and Sweden for: Demographic performance of European tree species at their hot and cold climatic edges, plus ancillary climate data

Sophia Ratcliffe, Jonas Dahlgren, Aleksi Lehtonen, Christian Wirth, Paloma Ruiz-Benito, Miguel A. Zavala, Gerald Kaendler, Raisa Mäkipää & Georges Kunstler
1. Species range limits are thought to result from a decline in demographic performance at range edges. However, recent studies reporting contradictory patterns in species demographic performance at their edges cast doubt on our ability to predict climate change demographic impacts. To understand these inconsistent demographic responses at the edges, we need to shift the focus from geographic to climatic edges and analyse how species responses vary with climatic constraints at the edge and species’...

Effects of plant functional group removal on CO2 fluxes and belowground C stocks across contrasting ecosystems

Roger Grau-Andrés, David Wardle, Michael Gundale, Claire Foster & Paul Kardol
Changes in plant communities can have large effects on ecosystem carbon (C) dynamics and long-term C stocks. However, how these effects are mediated by environmental context or vary among ecosystems is not well understood. To study this, we used a long-term plant removal experiment set up across 30 forested lake islands in northern Sweden which collectively represent a strong gradient of soil fertility and ecosystem productivity. We measured forest floor CO2 exchange and aboveground and...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    56

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    56

Affiliations

  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    56
  • University of Helsinki
    5
  • Lund University
    4
  • Natural Resources Institute Finland
    4
  • Stockholm University
    4
  • University of Turku
    4
  • University of British Columbia
    3
  • University of Oulu
    3
  • Estonian University of Life Sciences
    2
  • University of Groningen
    2