67 Works

Marginal imprint of human land use upon fire history in a mire-dominated boreal landscape of the Veps Highland, North-West Russia

Igor Drobyshev, Nina Ryzhkova, Mats Niklasson, Alexei Zhukov, Irma Mullonen, Guilherme Pinto & Alexander Kryshen'
Spatially explicit reconstructions of fire activity in European boreal forests are rare, limiting our understanding of factors driving vegetation dynamics in this part of the boreal domain. We have developed a spatially explicit dendrochronological reconstruction of a fire regime in a mire-dominated landscape of the Veps Nature Park (North-West Russia) over the 1580-2000 CE period. We dated 74 fire years using 164 fire-scarred living and dead Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees collected on 31...

Power Properties of Ordinal Regression Models for Likert Type Data

Ulf Olsson
We discuss analysis of 5-grade Likert type data in the two-sample case. Analysis using two-sample t tests, nonparametric Wilcoxon tests, and ordinal regression methods, are compared using simulated data based on an ordinal regression paradigm. One thousand pairs of samples of size n=10 and n=30 were generated, with three different degrees of skewness. For all sample sizes and degrees of skewness, the ordinal probit model has highest power. This is not surprising since the data...

Experimentally increased snow depth affects High Arctic microarthropods inconsistently over two consecutive winters

Eveline Krab, Erik Lundin, Stephen Coulson, Ellen Dorrepaal & Elisabeth Cooper
Climate change induced alterations to winter conditions may affect decomposer organisms controlling the vast carbon stores in northern soils. Soil microarthropods are abundant decomposers in Arctic ecosystems affecting soil carbon release through their activities. We studied whether increased snow depth affected microarthropods, and if effects were consistent over two consecutive winters. We sampled Collembola and soil mites from a snow accumulation experiment at Svalbard in early summer and used soil microclimatic data to explore to...

Phylogenetic data for: High diversity of new and known Phytophthora species from phylogenetic Clade 10 in natural ecosystems of Asia, Europe and the Americas

Thomas Jung, Ivan Milenković, Tamara Corcobado, Tomáš Májek, Josef Janoušek, Tomáš Kudláček, Michal Tomšovský, Zoltán Nagy, Álvaro Durán, Marthin Tarigan, Eugenio Sanfuentes Von Stowasser, Raghuwinder Singh, Monique Ferreira, Joan Webber, Bruno Scanu, Nguyen Minh Chi, Pham Quang Thu, Muhammad Junaid, Ade Rosmana, Baharuddin Baharuddin, Tutik Kuswinanti, Nasri Nasri, Koji Kageyama, Ayaka Hieno, Hayato Masuya … & Marília Horta Jung
During extensive surveys of Phytophthora diversity, 14 new species were detected in natural ecosystems in Chile, Louisiana, Sweden, Ukraine, Vietnam and Indonesia. Multigene phylogeny based on the nuclear LSU, rpl10, ITS, ßtub, enl, hsp90, tef-1α, ras-ypt1 and tigA and the mitochondrial cox1, nadh1 and rps10 gene sequences demonstrated that they belong to phylogenetic Clade 10 which is structured into three subclades. Subclades 10a and 10b comprise soil- and waterborne species with nonpapillate sporangia and variable...

FIBE - FIsher BEhaviour model

Nanda Wijermans, Maja Schlüter, Kirill Orach, Wiebren Boonstra & Jonas Hentati-Sundberg
FIBE represents a simple fishery model. Fish that reproduce and fisher with different fishing styles that fish as their main source of income. The aim of the model is to reflect the different fishing behaviours as described and observed in the (Swedish) Baltic Sea fishery and explore the consequences of different approximations of human/fisher behaviour in under different environmental and managerial scenarios. The overarching aim is to advance the incorporation and understanding of human behaviour...

Weak population genetic structure in Eurasian spruce bark beetle over large regional scales in Sweden

Simon J. Ellerstrand, Shruti Choudhury, Kajsa Svensson, Martin N. Andersson, Carsten Kirkeby, Daniel Powell, Fredrik Fredrik Schlyter, Anna Maria Jönsson, Mikkel Brydegaard, Bengt Hansson & Anna Runemark
The Eurasian spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus, is a major pest, capable of killing spruce forests during large population outbreaks. Recorded dispersal distances of individual beetles are typically within hundreds of meters or a few kilometres. However, the connectivity between populations at larger distances and longer time spans and how this is affected by the habitat is less studied, despite its importance for understanding at which distances local outbreaks may spread. Previous population genetic studies...

Pollinator data from: Pollinator movement activity influences genetic diversity and differentiation of spatially isolated populations of clonal forest herbs

Jannis Till Feigs, Stephanie I. J. Holzhauer, Siyu Huang, Jörg Brunet, Martin Diekmann, Per-Ola Hedwall, Katja Kramp & Tobias Naaf
In agricultural landscapes, forest herbs live in small, spatially isolated forest patches. For their long-term survival, their populations depend on animals as genetic linkers that provide pollen- or seed-mediated gene flow among different forest patches. However, whether insect pollinators serve as genetic linkers among spatially isolated forest herb populations in agricultural landscapes remains to be shown. Here, we used population genetic methods to analyze: (A) the genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of populations of two...

Additional file 5 of Genome-resolved analyses show an extensive diversification in key aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading enzymes across bacteria and archaea

Maryam Rezaei Somee, Mohammad Ali Amoozegar, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi Dastgheib, Mahmoud Shavandi, Leila Ghanbari Maman, Stefan Bertilsson & Maliheh Mehrshad
Additional file 5.

Additional file 7 of Genome-resolved analyses show an extensive diversification in key aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading enzymes across bacteria and archaea

Maryam Rezaei Somee, Mohammad Ali Amoozegar, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi Dastgheib, Mahmoud Shavandi, Leila Ghanbari Maman, Stefan Bertilsson & Maliheh Mehrshad
Additional file 7.

Additional file 9 of Genome-resolved analyses show an extensive diversification in key aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading enzymes across bacteria and archaea

Maryam Rezaei Somee, Mohammad Ali Amoozegar, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi Dastgheib, Mahmoud Shavandi, Leila Ghanbari Maman, Stefan Bertilsson & Maliheh Mehrshad
Additional file 9: Supplementary Figure S1. Schematic representation of HC degradation pathways studied in this work. Purple circles show key HC degrading enzymes trigerring the degradation. Blue circles are other crucial enzymes. Important intermediate compounds are written in blue. Supplementary Figure S2. Distribution of 143512 genomes of the GTDB database release 89 in different phyla. Supplementary Figure S3. Distribution of aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading genes across domain bacteria at the phylum level. In plot A, the color...

The role of terrestrial productivity in regulating aquatic dissolved organic carbon concentrations in boreal catchments

Xudan Zhu, Liang Chen, Jukka Pumpanen, Anne Ojala, John Zobitz, Xuan Zhou, Hjalmar Laudon, Marjo Palviainen, Kimmo Neitola & Frank Berninger
The past decades have witnessed an increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in the catchments of the Northern Hemisphere. Increases in terrestrial productivity may be a reason for the increases in DOC concentration. The aim of this study is to investigate the impacts of increased terrestrial productivity and changed hydrology following climate change on DOC concentrations. We tested and quantified the effects of gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (RE) and discharge on DOC...

Common guillemots in the Baltic Sea studied with video surveillance and object detection: raw data, annotations, model, and model outputs

Jonas Hentati-Sundberg & Agnes Olin
The data comes from common guillemots studied at Stora Karlsö, Sweden between 2019 and 2021. The common guillemots breed at an artificial cliff, and has been filmed continusly from above over three breeding seasons. Using the video material, a YOLOv4 model has been trained to detect adult birds, chicks and eggs. The dataset contains annotations (bounding boxes) used for training the model, the model itself, and outputs from the model (object detections). The data can...

Leap-frog migration and residents: new migratory habits in Swedish Greylag geese

Lovisa Nilsson, Camilla Olsson, Johan Elmberg, Nils Bunnefeld, Niklas Liljebäck & Johan Månsson
Knowledge about intraspecific and individual variation in bird migration behavior is important to predict spatiotemporal distribution, patterns of phenology, breeding success and interactions with the surrounding environment (e.g., human livelihoods). Such variation is key to adaptive, evolutionary responses, i.e., how individuals respond spatiotemporally to the environment to maximize fitness. In this study we used GPS location data from one to three full annual cycles from 76 Greylag geese Anser anser to test the hypothesis that...

Root traits along a subarctic tundra elevational gradient

Clydecia Spitzer
While root trait research has received increasing attention over the past two decades, the relationship between root traits and environmental factors remains elusive. At the same time, knowledge about these relationships is necessary if we are to understand plant community responses to environmental change. Here, we assessed the relationships between elevation (i.e., temperature) and fine root traits of plant species and communities. We focused on the sub-arctic tundra where plant communities are expected to experience...

Pink salmon distribution in Sweden: the calm before the storm?

Thomas Staveley & Ida Ahlbeck Bergendahl
Pink salmon distribution has recently expanded substantially across northern Europe. On the Swedish west coast, relatively few pink salmon have been observed to date, nonetheless a notable rise in 2021 (70 observations). However, with no national monitoring together with a ceased Atlantic salmon commercial fishery, there is little opportunity to understand the extent of the spread in this region. Here we present the current data and address the need for future monitoring and research in...

Leveraging functional traits of cover crops to coordinate crop productivity and soil health

Chongzhe Zhang, Wenfeng Xue, Jingrong Xue, Jing Zhang, Lujie Qiu, Xiaoyun Chen, Feng Hu, Paul Kardol & Manqiang Liu
1. Plants act as ecosystem engineers playing fundamental roles in steering their surroundings, including soil abiotic and biotic conditions, soil organisms, and the complex soil food web they comprise. Trait-based approaches have been considered a ‘Holy Grail’ in linking plants to ecosystem functions, but the mechanistic relationship between plant traits and the soil food web as an indicator of soil health remains poorly understood. 2. We examined this relationship for 16 cover crop species differing...

Variation and correlation in the timing of breeding of North Atlantic seabirds across multiple scales

Katharine Keogan, Francis Daunt, Sarah Wanless, Richard Phillips, David Alvarez, Tycho Anker-Nilssen, Robert Barrett, Claus Bech, Peter Becker, Per-Arvid Berglund, Sandra Bouwhuis, Zofia Burr, Olivier Chastel, Signe Christensen-Dalsgaard, Sébastien Descamps, Tony Diamond, Kyle Elliott, Kjell Einar Erikstad, Mike Harris, Jonas Hentati-Sundberg, Martin Heubeck, Magdalene Langset, Svein Lorentsen, Heather Major, Mark Mallory … & Stephen Kress
Timing of breeding, an important driver of fitness in many populations, is widely studied in the context of global change, yet despite considerable efforts to identify environmental drivers of seabird nesting phenology, for most populations we lack evidence of strong drivers. Here we adopt an alternative approach, examining the degree to which different populations positively covary in their annual phenology to infer whether phenological responses to environmental drivers are likely to be (i) shared across...

The proximity of rapeseed fields influences levels of forest damage by red deer

Anders Jarnemo, Anna Widén, Johan Månsson & Annika M Felton
We investigated the relationship between the level of red deer Cervus elaphus bark stripping damage in 68 Norway spruce Picea abies stands, and the presence of rapeseed Brassica napus fields in the surroundings, hypothesising that damage increases with decreasing distance to rapeseed fields. We also considered other potentially influencing factors, such as supplemental feeding, alternative forage availability, and deer use of spruce stands as indexed by a pellet group count. Bark stripping rates were measured...

Additional file 3 of Genome-resolved analyses show an extensive diversification in key aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading enzymes across bacteria and archaea

Maryam Rezaei Somee, Mohammad Ali Amoozegar, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi Dastgheib, Mahmoud Shavandi, Leila Ghanbari Maman, Stefan Bertilsson & Maliheh Mehrshad
Additional file 3.

Genome-resolved analyses show an extensive diversification in key aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading enzymes across bacteria and archaea

Maryam Rezaei Somee, Mohammad Ali Amoozegar, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi Dastgheib, Mahmoud Shavandi, Leila Ghanbari Maman, Stefan Bertilsson & Maliheh Mehrshad
Abstract Background Hydrocarbons (HCs) are organic compounds composed solely of carbon and hydrogen that are mainly accumulated in oil reservoirs. As the introduction of all classes of hydrocarbons including crude oil and oil products into the environment has increased significantly, oil pollution has become a global ecological problem. However, our perception of pathways for biotic degradation of major HCs and key enzymes in these bioconversion processes has mainly been based on cultured microbes and is...

Additional file 5 of Genome-resolved analyses show an extensive diversification in key aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading enzymes across bacteria and archaea

Maryam Rezaei Somee, Mohammad Ali Amoozegar, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi Dastgheib, Mahmoud Shavandi, Leila Ghanbari Maman, Stefan Bertilsson & Maliheh Mehrshad
Additional file 5.

Additional file 8 of Genome-resolved analyses show an extensive diversification in key aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading enzymes across bacteria and archaea

Maryam Rezaei Somee, Mohammad Ali Amoozegar, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi Dastgheib, Mahmoud Shavandi, Leila Ghanbari Maman, Stefan Bertilsson & Maliheh Mehrshad
Additional file 8.

Data from: Scale-dependence of landscape heterogeneity effects on plant invasions

Dorota Kotowska, Tomas Pärt, Piotr Skórka, Alistair G. Auffret & Michał Żmihorski
Invasive alien species are amongst the most concerning threats to native biodiversity worldwide, and the level of landscape heterogeneity is considered to affect spatial patterns of their occurrence and spread. However, as previous studies on these associations report contrasting results, the role of landscape heterogeneity on its susceptibility to invasions remains poorly understood. Landscape heterogeneity is usually described by two measures: configuration and composition. Both measures may differently affect invasive species and these impacts may...

Rebuilding green infrastructure in boreal production forest given future global wood demand

Helen Moor, Jeannette Eggers, Henna Fabritius & Tord Snäll
Global policy for future biodiversity conservation is ultimately implemented at landscape and local scales. In parallel, green infrastructure (GI) planning needs to account for socio-economic dynamics at national and global scales. Progress towards policy goals must, in turn, be evaluated at the landscape scale. Evaluation tools are often environmental quality objectives (EQO) indicators. We present three management scenarios for a 100,000 hectare boreal forest landscape in Sweden in the coming 100 years. The scenarios optimize...

A genome-wide test for paternal indirect genetic effects on lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster

Vinesh N Shenoi, Martin I Brengdahl, Jaime L Grace, Björn Eriksson, Patrik Rydén & Urban Friberg
Exposing sires to various environmental manipulations has demonstrated that paternal effects can be non-trivial also in species where male investment in offspring is almost exclusively limited to sperm. Whether paternal effects also have a genetic component (i.e. paternal indirect genetic effects - PIGEs) in such species is however largely unknown, primarily because of methodological difficulties separating indirect from direct effects of genes. PIGEs may nevertheless be important, since they have the capacity to contribute to...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    67

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    56
  • Text
    5
  • Collection
    4
  • Journal Article
    1
  • Software
    1

Affiliations

  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    67
  • National Iranian Oil Company (Iran)
    20
  • Science for Life Laboratory
    20
  • University of Tehran
    20
  • Umeå University
    9
  • Lund University
    7
  • Blekingesjukhuset
    4
  • University of Helsinki
    4
  • University of Eastern Finland
    3
  • University of Kentucky
    3