8 Works

Data from: Extensive hybridization following a large escape of domesticated Atlantic salmon in the Northwest Atlantic

Brendan F. Wringe, Nicholas W. Jeffery, Ryan R.E. Stanley, Lorraine C. Hamilton, Eric C. Anderson, Ian A. Fleming, Carole Grant, J. Brian Dempson, Geoff Veinott, Steven J. Duffy & Ian R. Bradbury
SNP genotype dataSNP genotype data for 95 SNPs for juvenile and baseline samples.2014_2015_data.csvGeographic distance from escape event to each riverGeographic distance from escape event to each riverDistance_from_escape.csvRiver Axial Distances and Catch

Data from: Robust estimates of a high Ne/N ratio in a top marine predator, southern bluefin tuna

Robin S. Waples, Peter M. Grewe, Mark W. Bravington, Richard Hillarty & Pierre Feutry
Genetic studies of several marine species with high fecundity have produced “tiny” estimates (≤10−3) of the ratio of effective population size (Ne) to adult census size (N), suggesting that even very large populations might be at genetic risk. A recent study using close-kin mark-recapture methods estimated adult abundance at N ≈ 2 × 106 for southern bluefin tuna (SBT), a highly fecund top predator that supports a lucrative (~$1 billion/year) fishery. We used the same...

Supplementary Information: Antibiotic resistance in Vibrio-like bacteria is common on Cape Cod, MA beaches

Megan May & Rebecca J. Gast
Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a natural process, enhanced by anthropogenic antibiotic use. Natural environments, like the ocean, act as reservoirs of resistance; but until recently, little research has examined their dynamics. Six beaches on Cape Cod, MA, with varying human impacts, were sampled over one year on nine occasions. Vibrio-like bacteria were isolated from wet sand, dry sand, and water from each beach and tested for sensitivity to five antibiotics (amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, oxytetracycline,...

Data from: Acquisition of obligate mutualist symbionts during the larval stage is not beneficial for a coral host

Aaron Hartmann, Kristen Marhaver, Anke Klueter, Michael Lovci, Collin Closek, Erika Diaz Almeyda, Valerie Chamberland, Frederick Archer, Dimitri Deheyn, Mark Vermeij & Monica Medina
Theory suggests that the direct transmission of endosymbionts from parents to offspring (vertical transmission) in animal hosts is advantageous and evolutionarily stable, yet many host species instead acquire their symbionts from the environment (horizontal acquisition). An outstanding question in marine biology is why some scleractinian corals do not provision their eggs and larvae with the endosymbiotic dinoflagellates that are necessary for a juvenile’s ultimate survival. We tested whether the acquisition of photosynthetic endosymbionts (family Symbiodiniaceae)...

Data from: Evaluating consumptive and nonconsumptive predator effects on prey density using field times series data

, Scott D. Peacor, David B. Bunnell, Henry A. Vanderploeg, Steve A. Pothoven, Ashley K. Elgin, James R. Bence, Jing Jiao, Edward L. Ionides, D.B. Bunnell, J.A. Marino, E.L. Ionides, S.A. Pothoven, A.K. Elgin, H.A. Vanderploeg, S.D. Peacor & J.R. Bence
Determining the degree to which predation affects prey abundance in natural communities constitutes a key goal of ecological research. Predators can affect prey through both consumptive effects (CEs) and nonconsumptive effects (NCEs), although the contributions of each mechanism to the density of prey populations remain largely hypothetical in most systems. Common statistical methods applied to time series data cannot elucidate the mechanisms responsible for hypothesized predator effects on prey density (e.g., differentiate CEs from NCEs),...

Data from: Host‐derived population genomics data provides insights into bacterial and diatom composition of the killer whale skin

Rebecca Hooper, Jaelle C. Brealey, Tom Van Der Valk, Antton Alberdi, John W. Durban, Holly Fearnbach, Kelly M. Robertson, Robin W. Baird, M. Bradley Hanson, Paul Wade, M. Thomas P. Gilbert, Philip A. Morin, Jochen B. W. Wolf, Andrew D. Foote, Katerina Guschanski & Phillip A. Morin
Recent exploration into the interactions and relationship between hosts and their microbiota has revealed a connection between many aspects of the host's biology, health and associated micro‐organisms. Whereas amplicon sequencing has traditionally been used to characterize the microbiome, the increasing number of published population genomics data sets offers an underexploited opportunity to study microbial profiles from the host shotgun sequencing data. Here, we use sequence data originally generated from killer whale Orcinus orca skin biopsies...

Data from: Rare long-distance dispersal of a marine angiosperm across the Pacific Ocean

Timothy M. Smith, Paul H. York, Bernardo R. Broitman, Martin Thiel, Graeme C. Hays, Erik Van Sebille, Nathan F. Putman, Peter I. Macreadie & Craig D. H. Sherman
Aim: Long-distance dispersal (LDD) events occur rarely but play a fundamental role in shaping species biogeography. Lying at the heart of island biogeography theory, LDD relies on unusual events to facilitate colonisation of new habitats and range expansion. Despite the importance of LDD, it is inherently difficult to quantify due to the rarity of such events. We estimate the probability of LDD of the seagrass Heterozostera nigricaulis, a common Australian species, across the Pacific Ocean...

Data from: Combining fish and benthic communities into multiple regimes reveals complex reef dynamics

Mary K. Donovan, Alan M. Friedlander, Joey Lecky, Jean-Baptiste Jouffray, Gareth J. Williams, Lisa M. Wedding, Larry B. Crowder, Ashley L. Erickson, Nick A. J. Graham, Jamison M. Gove, Carrie V. Kappel, Kendra Karr, John N. Kittinger, Albert V. Norström, Magnus Nyström, Kirsten L. L. Oleson, Kostantinos A. Stamoulis, Crow White, Ivor D. Williams & Kimberly A. Selkoe
Coral reefs worldwide face an uncertain future with many reefs reported to transition from being dominated by corals to macroalgae. However, given the complexity and diversity of the ecosystem, research on how regimes vary spatially and temporally is needed. Reef regimes are most often characterised by their benthic components; however, complex dynamics are associated with losses and gains in both fish and benthic assemblages. To capture this complexity, we synthesised 3,345 surveys from Hawai‘i to...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    8

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    8

Affiliations

  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    8
  • Bangor University
    2
  • University of Newcastle Australia
    1
  • Stanford University
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1
  • Stockholm Resilience Centre
    1
  • University of California, San Diego
    1
  • Alaska Fisheries Science Center
    1
  • South University
    1
  • University of Hawaii at Manoa
    1