6 Works

Data from: Drought legacies are short, prevail in dry conifer forests and depend on growth variability.

Antonio Gazol, J. Julio Camarero, Raúl Sánchez-Salguero, Sergio Vicente-Serrano, Xavier Serra-Maluquer, Emilia Gutiérrez, Martín De Luis, Gabriel Sangüesa-Barreda, Klemen Novak, Vicente Rozas, Pedro A. Tiscar, Juan C. Linares, Edurne Martínez Del Castillo, Montse Ribas, Ignacio García-González, Fernando Silla, Álvaro Camisón, Mar Genova, Jose Miguel Olano, Ana-Maria Hereș, Jorge Curiel-Yuste, Luis A. Longares, Andrea Hevia, Miquel Tomas-Burguera & Juan Galván
The negative impacts of drought on forest growth and productivity last for several years generating legacies, although the factors that determine why such legacies vary across sites and tree species remain unclear. We used an extensive network of tree-ring width (RWI, ring-width index) records of 16 tree species from 567 forests, and high-resolution climate and NDVI datasets across Spain during the common period 1982‒2008 to test the hypothesis that climate conditions and growth features modulate...

The evolutionary history of sedges (Cyperaceae) in Madagascar

Isabel Larridon, Daniel Spalink, Pedro Jiménez-Mejías, José Ignacio Márquez-Corro, Santiago Martín-Bravo & Marcial Escudero
Aim: Madagascar is renowned for its unparalleled biodiversity and endemism. With many ecosystems under threat, research is urgently needed on its unique plant diversity. This applies both to Madagascar’s forests and treeless vegetation types. Sedges (Cyperaceae) are among the top ten species-richest angiosperm families in Madagascar (310 native species, 38% endemic), of which two thirds occur in open habitats. We aimed to infer the evolutionary history of sedges in Madagascar, by estimating the number, age...

Data from: Changes in ecosystem properties after postfire management strategies in wildfire affected areas

Manuel Esteban Lucas Borja, Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, Miriam Muñoz-Rojas, Pedro Antonio Plaza-Alvarez, Maria Elena Gómez Sanchez, Javier González Romero, Esther Peña-Molina, Daniel Moya & Jorge De Las Heras
1. Forest are highly vulnerable to global change drivers, such as an increase in wildfire events. Learning more about how and why different postfire management strategies regulate the ability of forest ecosystem properties (e.g., plant diversity and function) to simultaneously recover after wildfire and provide multiple ecosystem functions is of critical importance. 2. This study aims to evaluate how unburned, burned managed and burned unmanaged plots regulate the responses of multiple forest ecosystem properties (e.g.,...

Constitutive and induced phenolics and volatiles in Quercus pyrenaica

Andrea Galmán, Luis Abdala-Roberts, Pola Wartalska, Felisa Covelo, Gregory Röder, Mark A. Szenteczki, Xoaquín Moreira & Sergio Rasmann
With this dataset, we studied elevational gradients and their underlying climatic factors in constitutive and induced phenolics and volatile organic compounds in Oak trees. Oak defences were measured in leaves in a field study. The dataset includes data for 18 populations of Quercus pyrenaica spanning a 1300 m elevational gradient (from 370 to 1614 m) with their correspondence coordinates. In each population we sampled six saplings that were randomly assigned to one of two treatments:...

A new remarkable dwarf sedge (Carex phylloscirpoid, Cyperaceae) from Northern Chile, with insights on the evolution of Austral section Racemosae

Pedro Jiménez-Mejías, Patricio Saldivia, Sebastian Gebauer & Santiago Martín-Bravo
We describe a new remarkable dwarf and apparently acaulescent species of Carex (Cyperaceae) from the Andes of northern Chile: Carex phylloscirpoides. Morphological and molecular data (two nuclear and three plastid DNA regions) were used to study the phylogenetic placement and systematic relationships of this species, which resulted in its assignment to section Racemosae. However, despite being related to the other three species of the section present in the Southern Cone based on phylogenetic evidence, it...

Selection on individuals of introduced species starts before introduction

Pim Edelaar & Adrian Baños-Villalba
Biological invasion is a global problem with large negative impacts on ecosystems and human societies. When a species is introduced, individuals will first have to pass through the invasion stages of uptake and transport, before actual introduction in a non-native range. Selection is predicted to act during these earliest stages of biological invasion, potentially influencing the invasiveness and/or impact of introduced populations. Despite this potential impact of pre-introduction selection, empirical tests are virtually lacking. To...

Registration Year

  • 2020
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Affiliations

  • Pablo de Olavide University
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  • Autonomous University of Madrid
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  • Basque Centre for Climate Change
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  • Misión Biológica de Galicia
    1
  • University of Neuchâtel
    1
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    1
  • University of Zaragoza
    1
  • University of Extremadura
    1
  • Transylvania University of Brașov
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  • Texas A&M University
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